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  1. #1
    @hibs.net private member Dalianwanda's Avatar
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    Trainspotting Film 26 years old

    Thats mental!?

    I remember first getting the book from a discount book place beside M&S Princes St in 1994. Never re read a book to many times or recommended it to say many people.

    When it was announced they were making a film & using the guy who was in Shallow Grave I wasnt that enthused (loved Shallow Grave just didnt think he was right for the part)......Taking the film as a stand alone I couldnt have been more wrong. Not sure if it was like nothing Id seen before, certainly nothing set locally I'd seen before. SO with my favourite book it probably became my favourite film too, just cant get over it being so old!


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  3. #2
    I first read the book when I was about 12, my high school English teacher was suitably horrified when I made it the subject of my 1st book report in S1.

    I loved the book then and still love it now. It was the 1st book I remember reading that was written as I had heard people around me talk when I was growing up. I recognised phrases and pronunciations that were just so Edinburgh. You see people writing that way on social media now and it always seems a bit affected to me but with Trainspotting it felt real and genuine. I love the way the book is totally chaotic, it jumps about all over the place, there isn't really a central narrative and all of the characters are very much an ensemble cast.

    Being totally honest I'm less keen on the film. I get why it's an important piece of British cinema and there is little doubt it's very cleverly done. However I thought it lacks the depth of character the book has. I understand there had to be a focus on a core group of characters but it lost something with that imo. The likes of Matty, Second Prize, Davie Mitchell and Rentons brother all had interesting stories in the book that were either entirely ignored in the film or the storylines watered down and given to other characters.

    I enjoyed the film and I've watched it more than a few times, if I'd never read the book I'd probably love it, but the book is in another league entirely.
    PM Awards General Poster of The Year 2015, 2016, 2017. Probably robbed in other years

  4. #3
    @hibs.net private member MagicSwirlingShip's Avatar
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    Always laugh at “second prize” 😂

  5. #4
    @hibs.net private member Dalianwanda's Avatar
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    The book had a bigger impact on me and have given copies to folk all over the world (although always found it surprising how many had actually read it)...Looking at the film, set at the pace it was, was never gonna be able to get into the depth the book did.

    I see the two as completely different. Saying that I was kinda gutted at the time that Second Prize wasnt involved.

  6. #5
    @hibs.net private member Carheenlea's Avatar
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    I remember the book being promoted in the Hibs Monthly fanzine, or maybe it was the Glasgow Gossip, but as Welsh had contributed articles under the name Octopus (I think) the brief summary was enough to make me place a pre -order with my local bookshop. When I got the call to say it was in, the woman in the shop handed it over with a look on her face that suggested she'd had a look at some of the content! A first edition but not in great condition now unfortunately given the number of re-reads over the years.

    I went to see the stage play in The Traverse Theatre, and Ewen Bremner played the part of Renton. I thought he was perfect for the role and when the film was released a few years after it didn't feel right seeing him playing the part of Spud rather than Renton - Ewan McGregor was basically too good looking for the role and didn't fit the image I had in my mind of the character.

    After investing as much time within the book I didn't really enjoy the film as much as I thought I would, but when did return for a re-read I didn't picture Renton as McGregor whilst reading which just proves the strength of the writing. I didn't hate the film and did enjoy it, but just not enough to visit it multiple times like the book.

  7. #6
    First Team Regular G15 Hibs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carheenlea View Post
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    I remember the book being promoted in the Hibs Monthly fanzine, or maybe it was the Glasgow Gossip, but as Welsh had contributed articles under the name Octopus (I think) the brief summary was enough to make me place a pre -order with my local bookshop.
    Hibbie Hippie/Sandy Macnair definitely gave it a few plugs in the Hibs Monthly (and maybe also in the wee booklets he put out himself around that time) as that's where I first heard about it too.

    Like folk are saying, the book and the film are very much different entities and have the feel of different eras, although only separated by a few years. To me, the book represents the arse end of Thatcherism and all the horrors that brought on society, while the film has more of a Britpop/Cool Britannia vibe about it. I'm sure somebody, it might even have been Mr Welsh himself, described it as Carry On Trainspotting and I think that's pretty much about right.

    30 years next year since the book was published? Incredible. It gave this then 16 year-old a very different outlook on life.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    I first read the book when I was about 12, my high school English teacher was suitably horrified when I made it the subject of my 1st book report in S1.

    I loved the book then and still love it now. It was the 1st book I remember reading that was written as I had heard people around me talk when I was growing up. I recognised phrases and pronunciations that were just so Edinburgh. You see people writing that way on social media now and it always seems a bit affected to me but with Trainspotting it felt real and genuine. I love the way the book is totally chaotic, it jumps about all over the place, there isn't really a central narrative and all of the characters are very much an ensemble cast.

    Being totally honest I'm less keen on the film. I get why it's an important piece of British cinema and there is little doubt it's very cleverly done. However I thought it lacks the depth of character the book has. I understand there had to be a focus on a core group of characters but it lost something with that imo. The likes of Matty, Second Prize, Davie Mitchell and Rentons brother all had interesting stories in the book that were either entirely ignored in the film or the storylines watered down and given to other characters.

    I enjoyed the film and I've watched it more than a few times, if I'd never read the book I'd probably love it, but the book is in another league entirely.
    Agree with a lot of that. Amazing, unique book (he's never come close to equalling it IMHO) but I thought the film was weak in comparison.

  9. #8
    @hibs.net private member Johnny Clash's Avatar
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    Bought it when it came out in 1994 just by chance outside Waverley station on way to London. I was on railway union national executive and thought someone had written about Trainspotters…. the rest is history. Couldn’t put it down. As others have said, to read the Leith lingo we talked was unique. I used to read passages out during ACAS talks (signal workers strike) at 3 am and some of our more milder leadership were in shock! Brilliant book, great film … Amazing soundtrack!

  10. #9
    @hibs.net private member bringbackbenny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carheenlea View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I remember the book being promoted in the Hibs Monthly fanzine, or maybe it was the Glasgow Gossip, but as Welsh had contributed articles under the name Octopus (I think) the brief summary was enough to make me place a pre -order with my local bookshop. When I got the call to say it was in, the woman in the shop handed it over with a look on her face that suggested she'd had a look at some of the content! A first edition but not in great condition now unfortunately given the number of re-reads over the years.

    I went to see the stage play in The Traverse Theatre, and Ewen Bremner played the part of Renton. I thought he was perfect for the role and when the film was released a few years after it didn't feel right seeing him playing the part of Spud rather than Renton - Ewan McGregor was basically too good looking for the role and didn't fit the image I had in my mind of the character.

    After investing as much time within the book I didn't really enjoy the film as much as I thought I would, but when did return for a re-read I didn't picture Renton as McGregor whilst reading which just proves the strength of the writing. I didn't hate the film and did enjoy it, but just not enough to visit it multiple times like the book.
    my memories very similar to yours, recall a debut novel by Octopus getting mentions in one of the fanzines so went to purchase it day 1 first edition from book shop. Lent it out to various family members and it getting trashed as a result.

    also went to the Traverse, sure there was a nudey bit lol.

    this has prompted me to look my first edition, now crying when I look at the going rates for good copies .






  11. #10
    A wee story that gives me a chuckle every time I think back.
    Was living and working on the island of Kos in Greece back in the mind 90’s and one nite before the bar got busy when we’d sit outside one of the English bar maids mentioned she had got the book and was gona start reading it. I started laughing and she got a bit annoyed and asked why I was laughing I explained about how it was written and it had took me some getting used too, but she went on to tell it wouldn’t be a problem as she was a taking English course a uni so I just left i.
    Safe to safe the next nite when she came in to work she was stuck on page one and came asking me what all these words meant along times past since but still brings a smile to my face.


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  12. #11
    @hibs.net private member Carheenlea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bringbackbenny View Post
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    my memories very similar to yours, recall a debut novel by Octopus getting mentions in one of the fanzines so went to purchase it day 1 first edition from book shop. Lent it out to various family members and it getting trashed as a result.

    also went to the Traverse, sure there was a nudey bit lol.

    this has prompted me to look my first edition, now crying when I look at the going rates for good copies .





    If it’s any consolation, yours looks in better shape than mines.

    Just had a look at first edition going rates and got a bit of a shock!

  13. #12
    Amazing book, amazing film. Just finished reading "The Young Team" by Graeme Armstrong, absolutely recommend.

  14. #13
    @hibs.net private member silverhibee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErinGoBraghHFC View Post
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    Amazing book, amazing film. Just finished reading "The Young Team" by Graeme Armstrong, absolutely recommend.
    Book was good film was dire, was brought up in Muirhouse as herion hit the streets, the film was nothing like how it was portrayed on the streets, there was no good drug addicts at that time, they were out 24/7 stealing anything they could from anyone, that included beating up OAPs for some money or a ring on there finger as they lay in bed, it was a terrifying place to stay, my house was broke in to a number of times by drug addicts.

    They only thing the film gets any credit for is that it highlighted that drug users could get HIV/AIDS from sharing needles, as the local doctor “Dr Robertson” mentioned when asked about the film.

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by silverhibee View Post
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    Book was good film was dire, was brought up in Muirhouse as herion hit the streets, the film was nothing like how it was portrayed on the streets, there was no good drug addicts at that time, they were out 24/7 stealing anything they could from anyone, that included beating up OAPs for some money or a ring on there finger as they lay in bed, it was a terrifying place to stay, my house was broke in to a number of times by drug addicts.

    They only thing the film gets any credit for is that it highlighted that drug users could get HIV/AIDS from sharing needles, as the local doctor “Dr Robertson” mentioned when asked about the film.
    Fair enough mate, before my time granted. Enjoy the film every time I watch it though. The book I mentioned previously is more my era and it's hard hitting and exactly as it was back then, thoroughly recommend. Being made into a TV series so hopefully it does the book justice.

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