hibs.net Messageboard

 

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 61 to 75 of 75

Thread: Books

  1. #61
    I can normally take or leave autobiographies. I just read Andre Agassis and couldn't put it down. Really good read and he's had one hell of a life.
    PM Awards General Poster of The Year 2015, 2016, 2017. Probably robbed in other years


  2. Log in to remove the advert

  3. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I can normally take or leave autobiographies. I just read Andre Agassis and couldn't put it down. Really good read and he's had one hell of a life.
    Totally agree. Excellent book.

  4. #63
    @hibs.net private member Godsahibby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    My Bit
    Age
    39
    Posts
    2,246
    Shantaram by Gregory Roberts.

    An amazing story. I could genuinely feel I was there with the sights and smells of India not many books have done that to me.

    Interestingly I started the follow up but never really got into it.

  5. #64
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    West Edinburgh
    Posts
    12,472
    Try any of the three novels of Graeme Macrae Burnet.

    His Bloody Project is the best known and was nominated for the Booker but they're all good psychological crime stuff.

  6. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by heretoday View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Try any of the three novels of Graeme Macrae Burnet. His Bloody Project is the best known and was nominated for the Booker but they're all good psychological crime stuff.
    Right, thanks for the tip. I've bought it on Kindle. I'd heard about it when it was nominated but your recommendation has reminded me.

    Note - I also bought Amelia Gentleman's book The Windrush Betrayal which is on offer for just 83p on Amazon.

  7. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by Tomsk View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I've read all of Dickens' novels except A Tale of Two Cities, Edwin Drood, half of Barnaby Rudge and half of The Old Curiosity Shop. The last two I just couldn't finish as life is too short and they were just too boring. I think you've done really well. If I had my time again I wouldn't bother with Martin Chuzzlewit and Hard Times. However, Great Expectations and Little Dorrit are well worth the effort in me 'umble 'pinion.
    A tale of two cities is a really good read. Takes a few pages to get into the style and flow but well worth it.

  8. #67
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    West Edinburgh
    Posts
    12,472
    The Little Friend by Donna Tartt. Small town Mississippi intrigue. So well written.

  9. #68
    First Team Regular G15 Hibs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    G15
    Age
    43
    Posts
    518
    I'm currently reading Devil's Day by Andrew Michael Hurley, after finishing his debut novel The Loney recently. Both mainly set in rural Lancashire, both modern day atmospheric landscape based folk horror, if you're into that kind of thing.

  10. #69
    I can recommend ‘Dead In The Water’ by Penny Farmer.

    It’s a true story about her brother and his girlfriend going missing in Central America. It’s a triumph of her will to find out the truth.

  11. #70
    @hibs.net private member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    9,259
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by heretoday View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    The Little Friend by Donna Tartt. Small town Mississippi intrigue. So well written.
    The Secret History , her first book is one of my all time favourites ....

  12. #71
    @hibs.net private member CmoantheHibs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    1,086
    Quote Originally Posted by bigwheel View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    The Secret History , her first book is one of my all time favourites ....
    Yes I loved that one too. Great book.

  13. #72
    @hibs.net private member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,935
    Quote Originally Posted by CmoantheHibs View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Yes I loved that one too. Great book.
    Me too! As I remember, I disliked almost everybody in it, but still really enjoyed it.

  14. #73
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    14,085
    I used to read ‘The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists’ with my son, while he was adapting to ‘grown-up’ books. He has now gone back, after a few years, to reading it on his own, as he preps for his Highers.

    I bought my daughter a copy of her own, but she is working through 1001 Arabian Nights. That might be a transition

    Nevertheless, both would rather be on social media or streaming my Spotify account to play music that makes me feel old because I don’t recognise it.

    I have just taken on Orlando Figes ‘The Whisperers’. It is an account, as it were, of how ‘ordinary’ people survived and lived in Stalinist Russia. I have a couple of other of his works but the only one I have read is ‘Natasha’s Dance’ which is a narrative of Russia’s cultural history from the mid- nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century.

    It is masterful. The title of the book refers to a scene from Tolstoy’s ‘War and Peace’. The author is informed, informative and not afraid to intellectualise.

    My favourite bit is towards the end where he desctibes the relationship between Shostakovich and Stravinsky. I am an ardent fan of Shostakovich’s works and if it were a Desert zIsland Discs scenario then he would be the prime candidate, but Stravinsky can claim to have changed music in a way that few others have. Probably only Beethoven, Bach and maybe Monteverdi or Palestrina before him.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

  15. #74
    @hibs.net private member Craig_HFC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Wallyford
    Age
    29
    Posts
    1,941
    I'm reading 'The Nowhere Men: The Unknown Story of Football's True Talent Spotters' by Michael Calvin and it's really interesting and enjoyable so far.
    PERSEVERE
    Verb: pə:ːsɪ'ˈvɪə/
    To not give up.
    To go the distance.
    To stop at nothing.

  16. #75
    @hibs.net private member Moulin Yarns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Spinning a Yarn
    Posts
    17,355
    Anyone who likes crime novels should be watching Bloody Scotland crime festival this weekend.

    https://bloodyscotland.com/watch/?mc...eid=a6c4aafee8

    Today at 1pm is Anne Cleeve and Peter May. I imagine Peter will be talking about the book he wrote in 2005,but was only published last month because the idea was too outlandish for people to relate to.

    https://www.waterstones.com/book/loc.../9781529411690



    Maybe everyone needs to read it.
    WASH YOUR HANDS, WEAR A MASK, IT'S NOT TOO MUCH TO ASK.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
hibs.net ©2020 All Rights Reserved
- Mobile Leaderboard (320x50) - Leaderboard (728x90)