hibs.net Messageboard

 

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 75

Thread: Books

  1. #1
    @hibs.net private member CmoantheHibs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    1,079

    Books

    With many people having more time on their hands atm what books are people reading? Phil Rickman is an author I like. Just finishing his book Friends of the dusk. He writes supernatural mystery which may not be everyone's cup of tea but he creates fascinating storylines that flow nicely and builds characters well. Looking for inspiration as to what to read next.


  2. Log in to remove the advert

  3. #2
    "Dont take your life personally" by Ahahn Sumedho.

  4. #3
    Deep south by Paul theroux
    Black box thinking by Matthew said
    Industrial society and its future by ted kaczynski

    Slowly working through them

  5. #4
    @hibs.net private member CmoantheHibs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    1,079
    Quote Originally Posted by Bangkok Hibby View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    "Dont take your life personally" by Ahahn Sumedho.
    That's an interesting one as I lived in Chiang Mai for many years so know a bit about Buddhism. Also studied vipassana for a while and still have a big interest in it. Cheers for that.

  6. #5
    @hibs.net private member HibbyAndy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Penicuik
    Age
    44
    Posts
    30,735
    Harlan Coben , He has done the strangers and safe on netflix and has numerous books

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by CmoantheHibs View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    That's an interesting one as I lived in Chiang Mai for many years so know a bit about Buddhism. Also studied vipassana for a while and still have a big interest in it. Cheers for that.
    I thought Chiang main was a great place although the zoo left a lot to be desired

  8. #7
    @hibs.net private member CmoantheHibs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    1,079
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzywuzzy View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I thought Chiang main was a great place although the zoo left a lot to be desired
    Yes I love Chiang Mai. Lovely place, fantastic people but the pollution played havoc with my asthma. Come back here to the fresh air then get told I'm not allowed to leave the house because of covid 19.lol

  9. #8
    @hibs.net private member Billy Whizz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Age
    59
    Posts
    34,395
    I wish I could put some time aside to read a book
    Just seems to be when Iím on holiday, but thereís nothing better than being engrossed in a good book

  10. #9
    Administrator Vault Boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Norwich
    Age
    24
    Posts
    5,978
    Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari is a fascinating read on anthropology. It's highly accessible without background knowledge and raises a lot of themes that really encourage some reflection on our place as a species, without being contrived at all. It's often on sale on amazon for a steal.

    He has another called Homo Deus that I'll be reading soon.

  11. #10
    @hibs.net private member Hiber-nation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Musselburgh
    Age
    62
    Posts
    15,483
    Just downloaded the complete works of Wilkie Collins to Kindle - free! He wrote The Woman In White which was serialised on TV last year. Also wrote The Moonstone which took me almost a year to get through! Worth it though.

  12. #11
    I working my way through Levison Woodís books.

  13. #12
    @hibs.net private member Eaststand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eastside
    Age
    62
    Posts
    970
    Just finished the Eric Cantona autobiography.
    It's the one written by a French author, Philippe Auclair (written in English) it's very well written with lots of detail from his early years in France and really is a cracking read.

    The Men of the 45 rebellion by Maggie Craig is what I'll be reading next.

    GGTTH
    Last edited by Eaststand; 01-04-2020 at 02:21 PM.

  14. #13
    @hibs.net private member MagicSwirlingShip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Leith
    Age
    33
    Posts
    2,450
    I have Night Boat to Tangier by Kevin Barry on the go now, quite enjoying it

  15. #14
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    West Edinburgh
    Posts
    12,465
    I just laid aside Ulysses by James Joyce for the Nth time. I'd tasked myself to finally finish it during this lockdown.

    But no - the old style Dublin banter wore me down again. It helps to have a knowledge of classical mythology too and I've forgotten most of that!

    I'm not denying it's a major work. The stream of consciousness device must have been sensational at the time.

  16. #15
    Coaching Staff Sylar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lanark/Palo Alto
    Age
    34
    Posts
    16,148
    Gamer IDs

    Gamertag: sjmcg1304
    Quote Originally Posted by heretoday View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I just laid aside Ulysses by James Joyce for the Nth time. I'd tasked myself to finally finish it during this lockdown.

    But no - the old style Dublin banter wore me down again. It helps to have a knowledge of classical mythology too and I've forgotten most of that!

    I'm not denying it's a major work. The stream of consciousness device must have been sensational at the time.
    I studied Ulysses for my advanced higher. Itís a fine but daunting piece of literature for a 17 year old! Iíve read it a few times since and enjoyed it more. Finneganís Wake is another story....its horrendous!

    Ive been on a low-brow tear lately: working my way through Michael Connellyís Bosch novels. I love the tv series so decided to check out the books. I also read Ant Middletonís ďFirst Man InĒ, which was pure fluff.

  17. #16
    @hibs.net private member CropleyWasGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    24,735
    Different book in each room these days.....

    Stuart Cosgrove's 1969.

    Alex Norton's autobiography

    A book of poetry by Robert Fergusson

    The Book of Love by Rumi.

  18. #17
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    14,081
    Quote Originally Posted by CropleyWasGod View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Different book in each room these days.....

    Stuart Cosgrove's 1969.

    Alex Norton's autobiography

    A book of poetry by Robert Fergusson

    The Book of Love by Rumi.
    You probably know this but Robert Fergusson died young, in a rather inhumane environment. One of his old friends visited him and was so appalled by the conditions that he started campaigning for better treatment for people with mental health conditions. His work led to the establishment of what is now the Royal Ed. Fergussonís friend was Andrew Duncan.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

  19. #18
    @hibs.net private member CropleyWasGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    24,735
    Quote Originally Posted by Mibbes Aye View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    You probably know this but Robert Fergusson died young, in a rather inhumane environment. One of his old friends visited him and was so appalled by the conditions that he started campaigning for better treatment for people with mental health conditions. His work led to the establishment of what is now the Royal Ed. Fergussonís friend was Andrew Duncan.
    Yeah, I did. I've recently become fascinated by his life and work. It's only taken me xx years

    Was trawling about Canongate Kirkyard a few weeks back. Seems he was the Jim Morrison of his day. Robert Burns paid for him to be disinterred from his pauper's grave and reburied properly. Robert (Devine?) wrote the epitaph, and that was subsequently rewritten by Robert Louis Stevenson.

    To cap it all, pre-lockdown, I had a Sunday afternoon stroll around my old school. **** me if there isn't a plaque to him on the wall, that I probably passed a zillion times without even noticing.

  20. #19
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    14,081
    Quote Originally Posted by CropleyWasGod View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Yeah, I did. I've recently become fascinated by his life and work. It's only taken me xx years

    Was trawling about Canongate Kirkyard a few weeks back. Seems he was the Jim Morrison of his day. Robert Burns paid for him to be disinterred from his pauper's grave and reburied properly. Robert (Devine?) wrote the epitaph, and that was subsequently rewritten by Robert Louis Stevenson.

    To cap it all, pre-lockdown, I had a Sunday afternoon stroll around my old school. **** me if there isn't a plaque to him on the wall, that I probably passed a zillion times without even noticing.


    His short life and works certainly impacted on some very notable people.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

  21. #20
    @hibs.net private member CropleyWasGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    24,735
    Quote Originally Posted by Mibbes Aye View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote


    His short life and works certainly impacted on some very notable people.
    .... clearly not my English class.

    The other things I found out....apologies if you already know this....

    There is a unit in the Royal Ed specifically for those with head and brain injuries, called the Robert Fergusson Unit. It was a head injury that caused him to be "sectioned" in the Edinburgh Bedlam.

    Edinburgh Bedlam was in the Forrest Road/Bristo Place triangle.... just along from the Bedlam Theatre.

    Edinburgh is full of these amazing stories.

  22. #21
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    West Edinburgh
    Posts
    12,465
    I'm reading a Lee Child book at the moment.
    Where's Jack Reacher when we need him?

  23. #22
    @hibs.net private member Hiber-nation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Musselburgh
    Age
    62
    Posts
    15,483
    Quote Originally Posted by heretoday View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm reading a Lee Child book at the moment.
    Where's Jack Reacher when we need him?
    Every time I read a Jack Reacher book I think "far fetched nonsense" but I always finish it and order another one!

  24. #23
    Iím reading ĎMidnight In Chernobylí by Adam Higginbotham.

    Fascinatingly detailed account of the 1986 disaster, very well written and easy to read, apart from a little bit of nuclear science that goes over my head.

    Anyone who enjoyed the HBO series would probably like this book.

  25. #24
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    West Edinburgh
    Posts
    12,465
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiber-nation View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Every time I read a Jack Reacher book I think "far fetched nonsense" but I always finish it and order another one!
    He doesn't need to resort to heavy stuff. All he does is take his boots off.
    Baddies swooning in all directions!

  26. #25
    @hibs.net private member lord bunberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    edinburgh
    Posts
    16,184
    Iíve had the urge to read some of the Jules Verne books for some reason. Iím thinking about starting with twenty thousand leagues under the sea.

    United we stand here....

  27. #26
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    West Edinburgh
    Posts
    12,465
    Quote Originally Posted by lord bunberry View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Iíve had the urge to read some of the Jules Verne books for some reason. Iím thinking about starting with twenty thousand leagues under the sea.
    A pretty accurate description of Scottish footer right now.

  28. #27
    Testimonial Due Hibee87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Leith
    Posts
    2,576
    Gamer IDs

    PSN ID: hibee-87
    I downloaded the Dirt (motley crue book). Since watching the film on Netflix I'd been meaning to pick it up. If you seen and enjoyed he film I highly recommend the book, they really were a bunch of animals. Even if your not into their music, I would recommend it. How none of them died I'll never know. (Although Nikki came close a couple times).

    I also never realised until last year that the T.V series Dexter was based on a book. I got hold of the first 3 and they are decent reads, the show is very loosely based on books so you can read them and not know what's happening if you've watched it.

  29. #28
    @hibs.net private member CmoantheHibs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    1,079
    Quote Originally Posted by Vault Boy View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari is a fascinating read on anthropology. It's highly accessible without background knowledge and raises a lot of themes that really encourage some reflection on our place as a species, without being contrived at all. It's often on sale on amazon for a steal.

    He has another called Homo Deus that I'll be reading soon.
    My sister just brought the paperback of sapiens down today.will start on it tonight.

  30. #29
    I just usually read anything. I like crime fiction, especially a series where I can read from book 1 right through a la rebus. I'm currently on the second last Logan McRae book by Stuart McBride.

    My favourite all time book is 100 years of solitude.



    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

  31. #30
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    14,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Just_Jimmy View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I just usually read anything. I like crime fiction, especially a series where I can read from book 1 right through a la rebus. I'm currently on the second last Logan McRae book by Stuart McBride.

    My favourite all time book is 100 years of solitude.



    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
    Nearly finished it, maybe thirty or forty pages to go. It is a thing of wonder. There are very few books I would ever re-read. This is one.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
hibs.net ©2020 All Rights Reserved
- Mobile Leaderboard (320x50) - Leaderboard (728x90)