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  1. #31
    @hibs.net private member bingo70's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ekhibee View Post
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    Both my parents are diabetic, and so's my wife who was sent home from work today to self isolate. As a result I'm off work for 14 days. I feel really sorry for her, she's had 2 major operations recently and now this. And to make it worse she's going to have to put up with me 24/7 for at least whole week! Nae luck.
    Strictly speaking I donít think you need to self isolate because your wife has diabetes? The 14 day thing is only if youíre showing symptoms. On day 15 of you go back to work you will be coming home and presenting the same risk to your wife?

    The flip side to that though i am in the same boat as you I think as Iím terrified of being the one that passes it on, Iím actually finding it quite mentally exhausting worrying about it at the same time as trying to keep her spirits up.

    We have made the decision to take our boy out of school, I know thatís against government advice but we just feel itís too risky waiting for him to come home with the virus, not for him, or me, but for the wife. I actually agree with the government strategy of keeping them in for as long as possible but for me the situation changes a bit when the kid is going home to an adult in the vulnerable category.

    Good luck though, hopefully you and your wife manage to keep your spirits up.


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  3. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by bingo70 View Post
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    Strictly speaking I donít think you need to self isolate because your wife has diabetes? The 14 day thing is only if youíre showing symptoms. On day 15 of you go back to work you will be coming home and presenting the same risk to your wife?
    Seems to be causing some confusion this point. Either that or people are just being overly cautious (which I understand).

    My Mrsís mum is diabetic, and a care worker, and the council have told her to isolate. Totally agree with her being off work now but the guidance is for social distance at the moment, which is different to isolating. My Mrsís dad has been told to isolate by his work because of her situation which, again, isnít in the official guidance.

    I think the two things are getting a bit confused although I think it is up to individuals to do what they feel is best for themselves.

  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeT View Post
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    Here is a link to the official version of the updated guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-social-distancing-and-for-vulnerable-people/guidance-on-social-distancing-for-everyone-in-the-uk-and-protecting-older-people-and-vulnerable-adults

    We are advising those who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures.
    This group includes those who are:
    aged 70 or older (regardless of medical conditions)
    under 70 with an underlying health condition listed below (ie anyone instructed to get a flu jab as an adult each year on medical grounds):
    chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema or bronchitis
    chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
    chronic kidney disease
    chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis
    chronic neurological conditions, such as Parkinsonís disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a learning disability or cerebral palsy
    diabetes
    problems with your spleen Ė for example, sickle cell disease or if you have had your spleen removed
    a weakened immune system as the result of conditions such as HIV and AIDS, or medicines such as steroid tablets or chemotherapy
    being seriously overweight (a BMI of 40 or above)
    those who are pregnant
    Note: there are some clinical conditions which put people at even higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If you are in this category, next week the NHS in England will directly contact you with advice the more stringent measures you should take in order to keep yourself and others safe. For now, you should rigorously follow the social distancing advice in full, outlined below.

    People falling into this group are those who may be at particular risk due to complex health problems such as:
    People who have received an organ transplant and remain on ongoing immunosuppression medication
    People with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy or radiotherapy
    People with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia who are at any stage of treatment
    People with severe chest conditions such as cystic fibrosis or severe asthma (requiring hospital admissions or courses of steroid tablets)
    People with severe diseases of body systems, such as severe kidney disease (dialysis)
    I fall into this bracket and itís not quite sunk in yet. Iím more annoyed that my 8 a side football is cancelled. However, as with others on this thread Iíll still walk a lot, golf should be ok as I spend most of a round in the rough away from people, and get the garden done. Not such a sacrifice in the grand scale of things really
    Last edited by Scorrie; 18-03-2020 at 07:04 AM.

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by B.H.F.C View Post
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    Seems to be causing some confusion this point. Either that or people are just being overly cautious (which I understand).

    My Mrsís mum is diabetic, and a care worker, and the council have told her to isolate. Totally agree with her being off work now but the guidance is for social distance at the moment, which is different to isolating. My Mrsís dad has been told to isolate by his work because of her situation which, again, isnít in the official guidance.

    I think the two things are getting a bit confused although I think it is up to individuals to do what they feel is best for themselves.
    When the SFA postponed all games indefinitely last week that was not down to official guidance from the government but the SFA decided to take its own action as a precaution.

    It seems that most of the official guidance right now is coming on the backs of people taking their safety into their own hands (which for the vulnerable categories is not being overly cautious, itís called being sensible).

    Schools will close today or tomorrow as on top of parents keeping children away, too many teachers are now having to self isolate due to being symptomatic or having vulnerable family.

    Complete shutdown by the end of the week.

    Be safe everyone.

  6. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSheep View Post
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    When the SFA postponed all games indefinitely last week that was not down to official guidance from the government but the SFA decided to take its own action as a precaution.

    It seems that most of the official guidance right now is coming on the backs of people taking their safety into their own hands (which for the vulnerable categories is not being overly cautious, itís called being sensible).

    Schools will close today or tomorrow as on top of parents keeping children away, too many teachers are now having to self isolate due to being symptomatic or having vulnerable family.

    Complete shutdown by the end of the week.

    Be safe everyone.
    Of course, people are entitled to do as they see fit. I have no issue with that.

    But I do think the guidance has been given for a reason. What if we have a complete shutdown by the end of this week, come out in however many weeks and weíre still at square one with the NHS then hammered with new cases at that point?

    Iím not a medical expert by any stretch of the imagination but donít feel there is any option but listening to those that are and the advice being offered. At the same time, I accept people have the right to take additional measures if they wish.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by B.H.F.C View Post
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    Of course, people are entitled to do as they see fit. I have no issue with that.

    But I do think the guidance has been given for a reason. What if we have a complete shutdown by the end of this week, come out in however many weeks and weíre still at square one with the NHS then hammered with new cases at that point?

    Iím not a medical expert by any stretch of the imagination but donít feel there is any option but listening to those that are and the advice being offered. At the same time, I accept people have the right to take additional measures if they wish.
    Yeah its a difficult situation to manoeuvre through... As you say we have to listen to advice from those who 'know better', but the kicker is that some 'experts' are disagreeing with each other so who do you believe? Every source of advice worldwide has a differing objective or agenda.

    The simple fact is you say 'what if...' that's where we are right now, 'what if....'

  8. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by bingo70 View Post
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    Strictly speaking I donít think you need to self isolate because your wife has diabetes? The 14 day thing is only if youíre showing symptoms. On day 15 of you go back to work you will be coming home and presenting the same risk to your wife?

    The flip side to that though i am in the same boat as you I think as Iím terrified of being the one that passes it on, Iím actually finding it quite mentally exhausting worrying about it at the same time as trying to keep her spirits up.

    We have made the decision to take our boy out of school, I know thatís against government advice but we just feel itís too risky waiting for him to come home with the virus, not for him, or me, but for the wife. I actually agree with the government strategy of keeping them in for as long as possible but for me the situation changes a bit when the kid is going home to an adult in the vulnerable category.

    Good luck though, hopefully you and your wife manage to keep your spirits up.
    Apologies Bingo, I didn't make that clear. My wife was sent home because she was coughing, had a dry throat and a bit of a temperature, and as a diabetic she falls under the high risk category. As a result of this, I have to self isolate and am off work for 14 days. I totally agree with everything you say though, although now it looks as if the schools will be closing this Friday. I had intended to visit my parents this Sunday (Mothers Day) but I'm giving it a miss and they totally understand.

    Unfortunately, we've not even got to the spike yet, it's going to get a lot worse before it gets better. IMO you did the right thing with your son, but the general situation seems to be changing by the hour.

  9. #38
    @hibs.net private member offshorehibby's Avatar
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    https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/spo...n-coronavirus/


    MOTHER OF ALL Ex-Celtic and current Hibs star Scott Allan fearful of coronavirus due to his diabetes and mumís M.S.

    ON any normal Motherís Day Scott Allan would arrive at his mumís door without a second thought.

    But today isnít any normal Motherís Day.

    The Hibs midfielder has had diabetes since the age of three and knows how fatal flu can be for people like him.

    Meanwhile, mum Pamela suffers from multiple sclerosis.

    So as the deadly coronavirus continues to spread its tentacles, Allan admits the flowers and card might have to be left on her doorstep.

    As tough as that might seem, it really is safety first for the pair.

    Four-year-old son Zac is staying away for the moment too as Allan, 28, tries to take as many precautions as possible.

    With so little known about this latest, mysterious strain he knows his health must come first.

    Allan ó cooped up at home on his own in Bothwell ó said: ďThere have been a lot of diabetics who have had the normal flu who have died.

    ďThatís why youíre warned to get the flu jab as soon as possible around autumn time.

    ďIíve always been alright and Iíve never really had that. This is a guessing game for the public though.

    ďYou just canít see it ó and you just donít know the effect it could have.

    ďPeople talk about underlying health issues but a lot of people between 20 and 40 donít know if they have underlying health issues because they donít get checked.

    ďEveryone can look good on the outside but you just donít know whatís going on underneath.

    ďRight now I canít see my mum for any length of time as she has MS and is at risk as well. Itís not an ideal time.

    ďI last saw her three days ago. I had Zac on Wednesday but it will be limited time with him now probably.

    ďIíll probably see him next week and make sure we do the washing hands and sanitising like everyone else.

    ďHaving kids locked in a house is hard but if thatís what we need to do to get through this as quickly as possible thatís what we need to.

    ďEvery day more news comes out and the more people are getting worried.

    ďHopefully the lockdown with restaurants slows the rate but anyoneís guess is as good as the next personís. Thereís no timing and itís going to be hard for everyone.Ē

    Seeing Allan star on the pitch, itís easy to forget the health issues heís had to deal with on a daily basis since he was a toddler.

    An ambassador for Diabetes UK, he said: ďPeople get diabetes at different stages of their lives, which can be a big factor in how they deal with it.

    ďIf youíve been used to doing something for so long then get hit with diabetes it can be a hard transition.

    ďDiabetes is a difficult disease at the best of times for a lot of people. I wanted to be a footballer so I knew if I didnít have it under control I wouldnít be able to play.

    ďBut itís a battle every day and a lot more serious than people think.

    ďItís really hard to be perfect with diabetes all the time. Iíve had stages where itís not been as good ó and you donít know what people are going through in their lives which can affect their diabetes.

    ďFor me, personally, I needed it right to be able to play football. I canít speak for anyone else, but stress and things like that can affect it.Ē

    Allan has been trying to use his time at home the best he can. Most footballers donít own weights as they do all their workouts in the gym.

    While heís tried to track down the equipment he needs, heís been making do lifting SIDE TABLES to stay in shape.

    Allan said: ďEverything is just so surreal just now. Itís the middle of March and you genuinely donít know when youíll play football again.

    ďSince weíve been off, the only thing Iíve done outside is go for a run where I live around 5pm every night. Itís good to get a bit of fresh air.

    ďIíve been doing some home workouts ó press-ups, sit-ups, squats. Iíve got a side table that weighs about 5KG Iíve been using for squats.

    ďI look back now and wish when we were leaving the training ground for the last time Iíd taken some weights with me.

    ďIíve been trying to order weights online but theyíve sold out in a lot of places already.

    ďMy Netflix has taken a battering and Iíve been watching what Iíve been eating too because weíve gone from one extreme to the other.Ē

    Thereís also the mental health side. Most players are used to being around others every day.

    Allan, who didnít play a single game in his final year at Celtic last season, added: ďItíll be more down the line when it affects people, especially people like myself who live alone.

    ďThere are also foreign players who havenít gone home. Youíre going to be in the house for a long time by the looks of it.

    ďMost teams are calling it an off-season but I donít know what to call it because itís not an off-season.

    "Youíre not in a good head space, just like everyone else who has a job.

    ďIn football youíre used to being with people every day and now youíre hanging about yourself. Itís hard but thankfully weíve got FaceTime.

    ďAt Hibs weíve got group chats so weíre talking every day. Itís the same for everyone.

    ďYou just need to watch what youíre doing. We will come through it and at the end it might be a good thing for society in realising what things are valuable.

    ďIt puts everything secondary, like football. Iíve not watched Sky Sports News in the last week because there are more worrying things.

    ďGuys go to football to watch their team play every weekend.

    Weíre football guys so we think about that but itís a lot worse for people out there.

    ďI am missing football massively though. It feels to me like Iím back in quarantine like I was last season!

    ďI suppose if thereís one person who knows how to deal with no football, itís me!Ē
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  10. #39
    @hibs.net private member Jim44's Avatar
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    Life is difficult for everybody just now and maybe a wee bit harder for some. Scott has his own medical problems and on top of that, his mumís condition. Iíve read quite a lot of Scott Allanís comments on his condition in various Diabetes websites and publications and heís got a good head on his shoulders. If weíre all sensible, Ďbehaveí correctly and show consideration for others, weíll come out at the other end and begin to enjoy Ďnormalí life again.

  11. #40
    Meanwhile some pubs are staying open or people are having a day at the beach or heading off to their holiday home in the Highlands.Why do we have so many nut cases these days?

  12. #41
    @hibs.net private member Jim44's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancient hibee View Post
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    Meanwhile some pubs are staying open or people are having a day at the beach or heading off to their holiday home in the Highlands.Why do we have so many nut cases these days?
    I think theyíll get legislation through quickly, to stop the nutters. Itís a truism, and maybe more so just now, that youíre only as strong as your weakest link. They were saying on the news that, in Lombardy, the exodus of city dwellers to the countryside was one of the main contributors to the escalation of the Italian crisis.

  13. #42
    @hibs.net private member Billy Whizz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancient hibee View Post
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    Meanwhile some pubs are staying open or people are having a day at the beach or heading off to their holiday home in the Highlands.Why do we have so many nut cases these days?
    Where are pubs staying open in the Edinburgh area

  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Whizz View Post
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    Where are pubs staying open in the Edinburgh area
    There's none open.

  15. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim44 View Post
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    I think theyíll get legislation through quickly, to stop the nutters. Itís a truism, and maybe more so just now, that youíre only as strong as your weakest link. They were saying on the news that, in Lombardy, the exodus of city dwellers to the countryside was one of the main contributors to the escalation of the Italian crisis.

    I see they were fighting outside a Greenock pub.Probably West of Scotland supporters!

  16. #45
    Promising Youngster May21/05/16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mim View Post
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    I'm also 73, Jim. if you swap your diabetes for my COPD, we are in the same boat.
    I don't know if I'll be able to handle 3 or 4 months of isolation, with no football or other sports.
    Like you, Jim, I'll try to get out for a walk, but my lung disease means that won't be too far.
    I understand that I will be helping to ensure that the NHS is not overwhelmed, but my biggest problem is what exactly happens to the likes of us at the end of this 12 or 16 week period. The disease is still going to be around and it will still most likely kill me if I catch it.
    That's something to look forward to after a long isolation
    The best of luck to you

    Sent from my SM-A908B using Tapatalk

  17. #46
    @hibs.net private member McD's Avatar
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    Hoping someone can provide some advice - are type 2 diabetics to self isolate for 12 weeks?

  18. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by McD View Post
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    Hoping someone can provide some advice - are type 2 diabetics to self isolate for 12 weeks?
    Socially distance according to diabetes uk. Check out their website, its got a lot of good info.. i used it recently for a friend of mine but i learned a lot.

  19. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by McD View Post
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    Hoping someone can provide some advice - are type 2 diabetics to self isolate for 12 weeks?
    The list of those asked to self isolate for 12 weeks will be published tomorrow, who knows if diabetics will or will not be on it from day one. As serious as our condition is, there are many more that are of a higher seriousness to consider.

    Iíve basically been self isolating (symptom free) for the last 10 days anyway, due to working from home and also not taking any chances.

  20. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.S View Post
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    Socially distance according to diabetes uk. Check out their website, its got a lot of good info.. i used it recently for a friend of mine but i learned a lot.
    Social distancing... not socially distancing lol! The latter sounds a bit funny to me 😂

  21. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSheep View Post
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    Social distancing... not socially distancing lol! The latter sounds a bit funny to me ��
    Okay although i didnt actually say socially distancing
    Last edited by J.S; 22-03-2020 at 06:30 PM.

  22. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSheep View Post
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    The list of those asked to self isolate for 12 weeks will be published tomorrow, who knows if diabetics will or will not be on it from day one. As serious as our condition is, there are many more that are of a higher seriousness to consider.

    Iíve basically been self isolating (symptom free) for the last 10 days anyway, due to working from home and also not taking any chances.
    As a Type 2 with fairly good control, I am self isolating from everyone including my family ( I live on my own anyway ). I have good nearby access to open countryside, so I am taking walks but am self distancing from anybody coming within ten yards of me.

  23. #52
    @hibs.net private member McD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.S View Post
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    Socially distance according to diabetes uk. Check out their website, its got a lot of good info.. i used it recently for a friend of mine but i learned a lot.
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackSheep View Post
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    The list of those asked to self isolate for 12 weeks will be published tomorrow, who knows if diabetics will or will not be on it from day one. As serious as our condition is, there are many more that are of a higher seriousness to consider.

    Iíve basically been self isolating (symptom free) for the last 10 days anyway, due to working from home and also not taking any chances.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim44 View Post
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    As a Type 2 with fairly good control, I am self isolating from everyone including my family ( I live on my own anyway ). I have good nearby access to open countryside, so I am taking walks but am self distancing from anybody coming within ten yards of me.

    thank you all

    I was asking as my dad is type 2, well controlled, so far there seems to have been a lack of consistency across various information sites (understandably, this is such a fast moving situation), so,e are saying diabetes, others not, but never specifying type 1 or type 2.

    Iíll check out diabetes UK, thanks again

  24. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by McD View Post
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    thank you all

    I was asking as my dad is type 2, well controlled, so far there seems to have been a lack of consistency across various information sites (understandably, this is such a fast moving situation), so,e are saying diabetes, others not, but never specifying type 1 or type 2.

    Iíll check out diabetes UK, thanks again
    Was on the news tonight about diabetes, in type 2 and going to be working from home for the forseeable, it applies to anyone type 1 or type 2

  25. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by McD View Post
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    thank you all

    I was asking as my dad is type 2, well controlled, so far there seems to have been a lack of consistency across various information sites (understandably, this is such a fast moving situation), so,e are saying diabetes, others not, but never specifying type 1 or type 2.

    Iíll check out diabetes UK, thanks again
    The main difference between a T1 and T2 in this situation is the ability to cope with fever. Ina T1 fever is bad because it causes the insulin we inject to stop working or stop working as well. Most T2s donít inject.
    T1s then have the problem of combating high sugars and possibly ketoacidosis when fighting the virus too.


    Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.

  26. #55
    @hibs.net private member McD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigHibee View Post
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    Was on the news tonight about diabetes, in type 2 and going to be working from home for the forseeable, it applies to anyone type 1 or type 2
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar T Grouch View Post
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    The main difference between a T1 and T2 in this situation is the ability to cope with fever. Ina T1 fever is bad because it causes the insulin we inject to stop working or stop working as well. Most T2s donít inject.
    T1s then have the problem of combating high sugars and possibly ketoacidosis when fighting the virus too.

    thanks guys

  27. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar T Grouch View Post
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    The main difference between a T1 and T2 in this situation is the ability to cope with fever. Ina T1 fever is bad because it causes the insulin we inject to stop working or stop working as well. Most T2s donít inject.
    T1s then have the problem of combating high sugars and possibly ketoacidosis when fighting the virus too.
    You're quite right, but my wife is 1 of the minority, T2 and still has to inject.

  28. #57
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    Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder, type 2 isn’t. I’ve never really understood why there’s not more distinction between the pair as they’re so fundamentally different. The worrying thing for us type 1s is that this virus can cause your immune system to go in to overdrive, possibly not a good place to be if your body has a history of attacking itself.

    Every random spike in sugar levels recently has me in a total panic thinking it’s my immune system kicking in. Need to calm it and get a grip.

    I live on my own and have the kids every other weekend, genuinely scared of them picking this up and passing it on to me. Such a worrying time for most of us, you don’t half realise how much is taken for granted, and the only thing in life that matters is your health.

  29. #58
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    While not wanting to start a d*ck measuring contest, I do have to point out that while T1 and T2 are basically different ends of a similar spectrum, both conditions have negative effects in our immune systems, making us susceptible to catching viruses, colds, flus, etc more easily.

    Type 2 DiabetesIs a metabolic disease and is indicated by high blood glucose levels due to insufficient insulin production by the pancreas. Inflammatory response occurs as a result of immune response to high blood glucose levels as well as the presence of inflammatory mediators produced by adipocytes and macrophages in fat tissue. This low and chronic inflammation leads to damage of the pancreatic beta cells and insufficient insulin production, which results in hyperglycemia.Hyperglycemia in diabetes is thought to cause dysfunction of the immune response, which results in failure to control the spread of invading pathogens in diabetic subjects. Therefore, diabetic subjects are known to more susceptible to infections. The increased prevalence of T2D will increase the incidence of infectious diseases and related comorbidities.

    Neither are ideal in our current situation, hence why the government has not differentiated between the two so far.

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