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Thread: Freddie Starr

  1. #31
    @hibs.net private member Silent Boatman's Avatar
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    I never liked Freddie Starr at all, I did used to love a laugh at racism though.
    "If a player is not interfering with play or seeking to gain
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  3. #32
    @hibs.net private member Radium's Avatar
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    Freddie Starr

    Does the time capsule scene from a recent Scot Squad sum up the Ď70s? (Episode from the end of April and canít find a video to link).

    Re FS, my memory of him is as an impressionist, particularly Elvis. Clearly I was too busy watching the six million dollar man to pick up the socially relevant material


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  4. #33
    Private Members Prediction League Winner Hibrandenburg's Avatar
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    When you grew up in post imperial Britain at a time where casual racism was the norm and not only the government but also the school system was if not actively racist then at least neutral towards racism, then there's a reasonably high chance that you'll either be racist without actually knowing there's such a thing as racism or you're not confronted with it at all.

    I grew up in a village where the only black faces you'd see were on old photos from the mines. Freddy Star, Bernard Manning and other comic dinosaurs were all that was on offer on T.V. and the last influx of immigrants we'd seen were Poles who'd left to fight the Germans and Germans who'd stayed on after being held POW during the war. The first comedians to break through onto our screens that had any PC material were guys like Ben Elton and the Not the Nine O'clock News team early to mid 80's.

    Education is the key, but when the environment you grew up in is racially sterile then it's difficult to grasp a problem that doesn't touch your life or even exist in the world you live in. I must have been about 12 before I even seen a person of different race and remember feeling uneasy about how they drew unflattering attention from the local population and couldn't understand why that was. I'd never even heard the word racist never mind understood what it meant.

    It annoys me when people today get on their high horse and damn a whole generation based on what we understand today. In today's world there is no excuse for racism and most of my generation haven't just learned that racism is odious and destructive, but also helped pave the way for our understanding of it today. Not everyone born in the 60's are frothing Gammons.

  5. #34
    @hibs.net private member Peevemor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibrandenburg View Post
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    When you grew up in post imperial Britain at a time where casual racism was the norm and not only the government but also the school system was if not actively racist then at least neutral towards racism, then there's a reasonably high chance that you'll either be racist without actually knowing there's such a thing as racism or you're not confronted with it at all.

    I grew up in a village where the only black faces you'd see were on old photos from the mines. Freddy Star, Bernard Manning and other comic dinosaurs were all that was on offer on T.V. and the last influx of immigrants we'd seen were Poles who'd left to fight the Germans and Germans who'd stayed on after being held POW during the war. The first comedians to break through onto our screens that had any PC material were guys like Ben Elton and the Not the Nine O'clock News team early to mid 80's.

    Education is the key, but when the environment you grew up in is racially sterile then it's difficult to grasp a problem that doesn't touch your life or even exist in the world you live in. I must have been about 12 before I even seen a person of different race and remember feeling uneasy about how they drew unflattering attention from the local population and couldn't understand why that was. I'd never even heard the word racist never mind understood what it meant.

    It annoys me when people today get on their high horse and damn a whole generation based on what we understand today. In today's world there is no excuse for racism and most of my generation haven't just learned that racism is odious and destructive, but also helped pave the way for our understanding of it today. Not everyone born in the 60's are frothing Gammons.
    It's also important to remember the effect that WW2 and it's aftermath had on the national psyche and culture.

    I remember the 70s. In 1975, 44 years ago, I was 7-8 years old.

    In 1975 the war had ended only 30 years before, therefore somebody of my age now would have been 21 in 1945. I'm pretty sure that had my formative years been spent during a period of world war, with maybe a bit of "action" chucked in, I would have a different outlook from the one I have (and probably not for the better).

  6. #35
    @hibs.net private member NORTHERNHIBBY's Avatar
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    Imagine trying to pitch The Benny Hill show now.

  7. #36
    @hibs.net private member Kato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    I always find a great irony in the 'older' generation lambasting youngsters for looking up to or idolising influencers and reality TV stars.

    They were quite happy to lap up populist stereotypes, racism and misogyny. That's before we mention turning a blind eye to child abuse, sexual assault and rape. The worst part is they are still happy to turn a blind eye now, there are more than a few stars from the 60s and 70s still touring who were quite open about their relationships with young girls.

    On balance I think I prefer the shallow, fame hungry Instagram stars to the racist nonces.
    It's possible to have issues with both groups.

  8. #37
    @hibs.net private member NORTHERNHIBBY's Avatar
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    He will still get more bookings than Graeme Shinnie.

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