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Thread: Cooking Tips

  1. #31
    Can't be bothered with the faff of rubbing butter into flour for pastry, crumble, etc?

    Pulse it in a food processor. Works a treat.


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  3. #32
    Another one for lazy people - coating cubed meat in flour before cooking. Put the seasoned flour in a poly bag, add the meat and give it a good shake.

  4. #33
    @hibs.net private member Peevemor's Avatar
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    Years ago we organised a ceilidh and I'd lined up the cook from my local to do stovies for 200-250 people as a homer. The day before the do he didn't turn up for his work - it turned out he'd been kicked out by his girlfriend the night before and had decided to head back home to Aberdeen, thus leaving me stovieless.

    I called another cook that I knew who told me he could do it no bother, even though he was working that night and all day Saturday.

    He arrived the following evening bang on time with several big pots of stovies.

    I asked him how he'd even had time to peel the tatties.

    FROZEN CHIPS!

    So simple and ingenious at the same time - I still remember it 25 years on.

  5. #34
    @hibs.net private member wpj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peevemor View Post
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    Years ago we organised a ceilidh and I'd lined up the cook from my local to do stovies for 200-250 people as a homer. The day before the do he didn't turn up for his work - it turned out he'd been kicked out by his girlfriend the night before and had decided to head back home to Aberdeen, thus leaving me stovieless.

    I called another cook that I knew who told me he could do it no bother, even though he was working that night and all day Saturday.

    He arrived the following evening bang on time with several big pots of stovies.

    I asked him how he'd even had time to peel the tatties.

    FROZEN CHIPS!

    So simple and ingenious at the same time - I still remember it 25 years on.
    Brilliant, more expensive than tatties but given the time frame and the absolute nightmare of peeling tatties it's genius.

    Now, this will be interesting, can I have a recipe for stovies, I have made them a few times but has never tasted the same as when I had them as a kid in Scotland, usually at a school event. Also corn beef hash? These are great as freezer ready meals without the massive salt and sugar added. In return I will post a recipe for a very rich tomato sauce

    Also Peevemor, any tips or recipes from local Brittany cuisine?

  6. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by wpj View Post
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    Brilliant, more expensive than tatties but given the time frame and the absolute nightmare of peeling tatties it's genius.

    Now, this will be interesting, can I have a recipe for stovies, I have made them a few times but has never tasted the same as when I had them as a kid in Scotland, usually at a school event. Also corn beef hash? These are great as freezer ready meals without the massive salt and sugar added. In return I will post a recipe for a very rich tomato sauce

    Also Peevemor, any tips or recipes from local Brittany cuisine?

    The problem I have found with stovies is everyone as their own way of doing it.

    The basic recipe is tatties, onions, and gravy with meat(sausages/roast beef/corned beef)

    Slice tatties and onion around 5mm thick, only just cover with water and bring to the boil. Add seasoning a let simmer for around 20 mins or until tatties are starting to break up. Add gravy (dripping/bisto etc) and thicken. You can add whatever meat at this point and heat through.
    And that is basically it. I am sure there are more fancy recipes out there but they will follow this basic principle.

    Good luck.

  7. #36
    @hibs.net private member easty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    The problem I have found with stovies is everyone as their own way of doing it.

    The basic recipe is tatties, onions, and gravy with meat(sausages/roast beef/corned beef)

    Slice tatties and onion around 5mm thick, only just cover with water and bring to the boil. Add seasoning a let simmer for around 20 mins or until tatties are starting to break up. Add gravy (dripping/bisto etc) and thicken. You can add whatever meat at this point and heat through.
    And that is basically it. I am sure there are more fancy recipes out there but they will follow this basic principle.

    Good luck.
    more or less how I do it too, I put carrots and swede in as well though.

  8. #37
    @hibs.net private member Peevemor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    The problem I have found with stovies is everyone as their own way of doing it.

    The basic recipe is tatties, onions, and gravy with meat(sausages/roast beef/corned beef)

    Slice tatties and onion around 5mm thick, only just cover with water and bring to the boil. Add seasoning a let simmer for around 20 mins or until tatties are starting to break up. Add gravy (dripping/bisto etc) and thicken. You can add whatever meat at this point and heat through.
    And that is basically it. I am sure there are more fancy recipes out there but they will follow this basic principle.

    Good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by easty View Post
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    more or less how I do it too, I put carrots and swede in as well though.
    Stovies are great. Even other people's crap stovies are great.

    I've often thought that a food truck selling stovies would make a fortune at big events where there are normally only overpriced L & A burgers available.

  9. #38
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Don’t buy batter mix, pancake mix and yorkshire pudding mix. All three are made with flour, eggs and milk (plus dripping in the yorkies).

    You can make a whole load of stuff that also contains flour, eggs and milk.

  10. #39
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Good recipes can be found in the Guardian.

    Felicity Cloake’s how to section is really useful - check the back catalogue.

    Rachel Roddy’s section has loads of easy but tasty Italian stuff.

    Thomasina Mier’s easy recipes are far from easy but they are excellent if you try them.

  11. #40
    You can freeze rice despite people being wary of it. Cook a big batch, cool it quickly under running cold water, let it drain, divide into portions and put in the freezer. Freezer bags are ideal as you can lay the flat on top of each other. Microwave from frozen for 2-3 mins. Cheaper than packets of rice and takes about half an hour from start to finish.

    Edit: fluff the rice up to separate the grains before freezing.
    Last edited by beensaidbefore; 05-07-2018 at 08:30 PM.

  12. #41
    @hibs.net private member wpj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    You can freeze rice despite people being wary of it. Cook a big batch, cool it quickly under running cold water, let it drain, divide into portions and put in the freezer. Freezer bags are ideal as you can lay the flat on top of each other. Microwave from frozen for 2-3 mins. Cheaper than packets of rice and takes about half an hour from start to finish.

    Edit: fluff the rice up to separate the grains before freezing.
    Add veg and some stock to that for a savoury rice, much cheaper than a packet from the shops

  13. #42
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    What I love to eat/make is. Chicken on the bone marinated with chilli,garlic,Worcester sauce,mustard,chipotle sauce (hot) mix it in a big plastic bowl marinade chicken over night and cook in the oven hot spicy and goes down a treat

  14. #43
    To make a nice tomato pasta sauce is fairly simple and can be frozen. It makes a great base for most pasta dishes with the addition of more ingredients.

    Cook in a big pan in this order.

    Oil
    Diced carrot
    Diced celery
    Diced onion
    Diced pepper
    Diced courgette (optional)
    Salt n pepper
    Until onions are translucent.
    Add some mixed herbs
    Tomato puree 1tbs
    Tinned toms
    Passatta sauce

    Simmer for 30 mins until veg is really tender taste for seasoning. Might take longer depending on how large the veg has been cut, and how much stuff is in the pot

    Let it cool then put through the blender and decant to a second pot. Or not if you prefer it a bit chunky!

    You could use this for Bolognese, meatballs, lasagne, arrabiata and so on. Lasts for ages in the freezer.
    Last edited by beensaidbefore; 05-07-2018 at 08:50 PM.

  15. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by wpj View Post
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    Add veg and some stock to that for a savoury rice, much cheaper than a packet from the shops
    Love a stir fry too. Frozen rice is actually seems to be better for making them.

  16. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by pontius pilate View Post
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    What I love to eat/make is. Chicken on the bone marinated with chilli,garlic,Worcester sauce,mustard,chipotle sauce (hot) mix it in a big plastic bowl marinade chicken over night and cook in the oven hot spicy and goes down a treat
    Sounds nice. Gonna try that, or at least a similar version with the srirachi stuff I have in the cupboard.

  17. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Peevemor View Post
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    Stovies are great. Even other people's crap stovies are great.

    I've often thought that a food truck selling stovies would make a fortune at big events where there are normally only overpriced L & A burgers available.
    I agree. I was at a wedding and we all got cups of stovies about 10 o'clock. Went down a treat!

  18. #47
    Jambo Kickback's Flump of the Year 2008 Sergey's Avatar
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    Buy fresh ginger (a lot if you get it at market price) - break the nodules off and peel the skin. Throw the 1" nodules into a plastic bag and freeze. When needed, grate from frozen and put what you don't use back in the bag and re-freeze.

    You'll never throw another wilted piece of ginger away.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]


  19. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Sergey View Post
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    Buy fresh ginger (a lot if you get it at market price) - break the nodules off and peel the skin. Throw the 1" nodules into a plastic bag and freeze. When needed, grate from frozen and put what you don't use back in the bag and re-freeze.

    You'll never throw another wilted piece of ginger away.
    Excellent

  20. #49
    Jambo Kickback's Flump of the Year 2008 Sergey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    Excellent
    Disclaimer - do not defrost the ginger and then attempt to use it - it turns to mush. You have to use it frozen. When you grate it you'll see exactly how the structure changes from frozen to thawed.

    Same with fresh chillies. I get them in copious amounts. If you chop them fresh into 1 mm widths, flash freeze them on a tray (try to make sure the edges don't touch too much or you'll end up with a clump) and put the frozen shards of chillies in a bag and add right at the end of a cook. Again - do not defrost before using.

    Both don't take up a lot of freezer space and you have them 'fresh' whenever needed.
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  21. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Sergey View Post
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    Disclaimer - do not defrost the ginger and then attempt to use it - it turns to mush. You have to use it frozen. When you grate it you'll see exactly how the structure changes from frozen to thawed.

    Same with fresh chillies. I get them in copious amounts. If you chop them fresh into 1 mm widths, flash freeze them on a tray (try to make sure the edges don't touch too much or you'll end up with a clump) and put the frozen shards of chillies in a bag and add right at the end of a cook. Again - do not defrost before using.

    Both don't take up a lot of freezer space and you have them 'fresh' whenever needed.
    Nice idea with the chillies.

    Have you tried grating the ginger before freezing?

  22. #51
    Jambo Kickback's Flump of the Year 2008 Sergey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    Nice idea with the chillies.

    Have you tried grating the ginger before freezing?
    Doesn't work - you're breaking down the molecular structure.

    From frozen, you have minutes (probably 60 seconds) to get the frozen ingredients into the pan/wok/stock before it becomes unusable.

    Try a bit, either a chilli or a piece of ginger. You'll be a convert.

    More tips to follow...
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]


  23. #52
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    If you have time the best mashed potato is made from cooking the potato’s in the oven first as a jacket potato and scooping out the cooked potato to mash.
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  24. #53
    Coaching Staff One Day Soon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sergey View Post
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    Buy fresh ginger (a lot if you get it at market price) - break the nodules off and peel the skin. Throw the 1" nodules into a plastic bag and freeze. When needed, grate from frozen and put what you don't use back in the bag and re-freeze.

    You'll never throw another wilted piece of ginger away.
    Outstanding.

  25. #54
    @hibs.net private member wpj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    To make a nice tomato pasta sauce is fairly simple and can be frozen. It makes a great base for most pasta dishes with the addition of more ingredients.

    Cook in a big pan in this order.

    Oil
    Diced carrot
    Diced celery
    Diced onion
    Diced pepper
    Diced courgette (optional)
    Salt n pepper
    Until onions are translucent.
    Add some mixed herbs
    Tomato puree 1tbs
    Tinned toms
    Passatta sauce

    Simmer for 30 mins until veg is really tender taste for seasoning. Might take longer depending on how large the veg has been cut, and how much stuff is in the pot

    Let it cool then put through the blender and decant to a second pot. Or not if you prefer it a bit chunky!

    You could use this for Bolognese, meatballs, lasagne, arrabiata and so on. Lasts for ages in the freezer.
    Add anchovies for seasoning instead of salt, make a lovely rich sauce. I use that for meatballs stuffed with picante olives.

  26. #55
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    Beef & tomato pot noodle.fill to the brim with boiling water.add 2 packets of wotits.they melt into a cheese sauce.great drunken snack 😂

  27. #56
    @hibs.net private member easty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
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    Beef & tomato pot noodle.fill to the brim with boiling water.add 2 packets of wotits.they melt into a cheese sauce.great drunken snack 😂
    That sounds horrendous

  28. #57
    Carbonara

    First up, and this can't be stated strongly enough, CARBONARA DOESN'T HAVE CREAM IN IT. If your recipe has cream, it isn't carbonara.

    Right, now that's out the way ...

    Cook some spaghetti as normal.
    Fry some pancetta (or other tasty bacon) bits until crisp in a glug or 2 of olive oil in a large frying pan.
    Beat an egg per person in a large bowl, add an extra yolk if you're feeling decadent.
    Add about an ounce of grated pecorino per person (parmesan works too, but I think pecorino's better) stirred into the egg mixture and some black pepper.
    Drain the spaghetti, put it in with the bacon and stir it about to pick up the oil and delicious bacony-ness.

    Here comes the tip - now take the spaghetti/pancetta and put it in the large bowl of egg/cheese and give it a good stir round. The egg hardly needs any cooking, so doing it this way round means you don't run any risk of ending up with some sort of split/scrambled disaster.

    Serve, wee bit more grated cheese on top, job done.
    Last edited by JeMeSouviens; 06-07-2018 at 10:27 AM.

  29. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Sergey View Post
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    Doesn't work - you're breaking down the molecular structure.

    From frozen, you have minutes (probably 60 seconds) to get the frozen ingredients into the pan/wok/stock before it becomes unusable.

    Try a bit, either a chilli or a piece of ginger. You'll be a convert.

    More tips to follow...
    Chillis work fine frozen whole. Just chop them up still frozen. Will definitely try the ginger thing though.

  30. #59
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
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    Beef & tomato pot noodle.fill to the brim with boiling water.add 2 packets of wotits.they melt into a cheese sauce.great drunken snack 😂
    I didn't think I'd have anything to offer this thread, but now we're at the level of "make a pot noodle and stick a couple of packets of wotsits in it" then I might just have something to offer after all.

  31. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
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    Beef & tomato pot noodle.fill to the brim with boiling water.add 2 packets of wotits.they melt into a cheese sauce.great drunken snack ��


    Yum Yum! More E numbers than Mr C
    Last edited by beensaidbefore; 06-07-2018 at 01:58 PM.

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