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    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
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    The pizza tax

    What are peopleís thoughts on what is likely to be a highly emotive subject.

    Personally I am a big supporter of Jamie Oliver and his mission to reduce child obesity and in turn obesity in general.

    I know many others disagree with it for a variety of reasons.

    PS i know itís not a pizza tax but itís quite an eye catching title


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    Coaching Staff NAE NOOKIE's Avatar
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    I detest this scatter gun approach to public health .... FFS whatever happened to self control and good parenting. Its in the same ballpark as the utter loonies who actually would support hanging the odd innocent man just so long as it meant you got all the guilty folk too.

    I live in a town of 14,000 people and when I am in the town centre at lunchtime the kids are piling out of the high school for lunch ... there's usually a couple of hundred and practically none of them are fat ... either all these obese kids stay in at lunchtime or there's something in the water here that means the kids can eat and drink what they want without putting on weight.

    Anyway .... my advice to anybody on here under 40 is to start saving or investing in as good a private pension as you can possibly afford and advise your kids to do the same, because this headlong rush to force everybody to live to be 100 years old means you'll probably be lucky to qualify for a state pension at 80 ... enjoy your ridiculously long working life

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    Coaching Staff 21.05.2016's Avatar
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    What a nanny state we're becoming. Give people the information and the facts about what the risks are of eating too much junk, drinking too much, smoking etc. but let people make decisions for themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    What are peopleís thoughts on what is likely to be a highly emotive subject.

    Personally I am a big supporter of Jamie Oliver and his mission to reduce child obesity and in turn obesity in general.

    I know many others disagree with it for a variety of reasons.

    PS i know itís not a pizza tax but itís quite an eye catching title
    While i am instinctively sceptical about moves like this, we really do need to do something.

    While tye cry of nanny state may be correct, the problem is with a publically funded health system, the govt has to make interventions.

    I really dont think people realise how much trouble the NHS is in - and one of the big problem areas is diabetes. Already 10% of all medicine spending in scotland is on diabetes - and it is growing.

    Simply put, while any measures may be unpalatable, they may well be necesssry to stip the system collapsing.

    I totally agree that personal responsbility needs to come into it, some absolute morons out there think its acceptable to send a kid to school with a packet of crisps and a luminous blue 'energy' drink for their breakfast - what goes on in these people's heads?

    But unfortunately this is a societal problem, and it will need some fairly radical and intrusive measures, either to people, industry or both.

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    Coaching Staff Sylar's Avatar
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    There's such an element of "snobbery" about it, but we do drastically need to do something to reduce our waistlines generally in this country!

    Jamie Oliver attacked Dominos recently about their calorific content etc - having said that, here's a comparison between a margherita pizza at both places:

    Dietary Info Dominos Jamie's Italian
    Calories 744 839
    Fat 22 33
    Salt 3.5 3
    Sugar 11 10

    Is it OK that this is the dietary info for a pizza in his restaurant because it's a sit-down experience and slightly more posh than a takeaway?

    I 100% support efforts to tackle obesity, especially in younger children, but it needs to be a strategic approach - not a sledgehammer, nannying approach. As someone else pointed out on the alcohol thread, there are plenty of places around Europe where cheap booze exists but not the problems we see here. The same is true of junk food. Education is what's needed, not a mandated "thou shall not".

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    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NAE NOOKIE View Post
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    I detest this scatter gun approach to public health .... FFS whatever happened to self control and good parenting. Its in the same ballpark as the utter loonies who actually would support hanging the odd innocent man just so long as it meant you got all the guilty folk too.

    I live in a town of 14,000 people and when I am in the town centre at lunchtime the kids are piling out of the high school for lunch ... there's usually a couple of hundred and practically none of them are fat ... either all these obese kids stay in at lunchtime or there's something in the water here that means the kids can eat and drink what they want without putting on weight.

    Anyway .... my advice to anybody on here under 40 is to start saving or investing in as good a private pension as you can possibly afford and advise your kids to do the same, because this headlong rush to force everybody to live to be 100 years old means you'll probably be lucky to qualify for a state pension at 80 ... enjoy your ridiculously long working life
    See itís interesting you say that.
    My wife is a teacher. She says that the kids, on the whole, when given responsibility for their own lunch almost always select horrendously unhealthy choices. Now whilst that may not lead to being overweight it still leads to them being unhealthy which is not good.

    As has been said they will go for high sugar drinks and a packet of crisps or something.
    When I went to school in Musselburgh we had: a pizza place; a chinese; 2 chippies; Greggs; Fords; Lucas; Subway; Baguette Express; A supermarket. We also had a couple of smaller shops and of course all the cafes. They now have a cake shop that I know of - have since moved out of Muss so donít know for sure what is left. I went to school 8 years ago so not exactly long ago now

    The amount of kids that ate utter crap is staggering. As i said they may well not be overweight but they sure as hell were massively unhealthy.

    My wife also says there are some that get a tenner a day which is mental in itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by 21.05.2016 View Post
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    What a nanny state we're becoming. Give people the information and the facts about what the risks are of eating too much junk, drinking too much, smoking etc. but let people make decisions for themselves.
    The information is out there already and our obesity epidemic is growing bigger and bigger itís not far from being endemic of the country. As has been suggested this is to help the NHS survive the crisis.

    I would say that more people are overweight in this country than are not.

    Our perception of what is Ďnormalí has being shifted to accommodate these larger people. Meaning a person can be overweight and regarded as normal. Which they would be. However this is an issue

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    See itís interesting you say that.
    My wife is a teacher. She says that the kids, on the whole, when given responsibility for their own lunch almost always select horrendously unhealthy choices. Now whilst that may not lead to being overweight it still leads to them being unhealthy which is not good.

    As has been said they will go for high sugar drinks and a packet of crisps or something.
    When I went to school in Musselburgh we had: a pizza place; a chinese; 2 chippies; Greggs; Fords; Lucas; Subway; Baguette Express; A supermarket. We also had a couple of smaller shops and of course all the cafes. They now have a cake shop that I know of - have since moved out of Muss so donít know for sure what is left. I went to school 8 years ago so not exactly long ago now

    The amount of kids that ate utter crap is staggering. As i said they may well not be overweight but they sure as hell were massively unhealthy.

    My wife also says there are some that get a tenner a day which is mental in itself.



    The information is out there already and our obesity epidemic is growing bigger and bigger itís not far from being endemic of the country. As has been suggested this is to help the NHS survive the crisis.

    I would say that more people are overweight in this country than are not.

    Our perception of what is Ďnormalí has being shifted to accommodate these larger people. Meaning a person can be overweight and regarded as normal. Which they would be. However this is an issue
    I agree with the last paragraph. There was an article on fb where the top comment was a woman saying how women who are size 14-20 are normal and 12 and below are skinny, which just simply isnít the case as much as some people will hate to hear it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by calumhibee1 View Post
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    I agree with the last paragraph. There was an article on fb where the top comment was a woman saying how women who are size 14-20 are normal and 12 and below are skinny, which just simply isn’t the case as much as some people will hate to hear it.
    I think that starts to become a slightly different debate.

    Clothing sizes have drastically changed since we began outsourcing a lot of our manufacturing to China et al. It's at the point where "size 12" means nothing anymore, and that there's an arbitrary acceptability of what is and isn't normal.

    Last year, my wife picked me up 3 pairs of shorts from the same shop - all a 34 waist, but different styles. One of them wouldn't stay on without a fully tightened belt, one fit perfectly and one barely made it over my thighs (I'm not that big a guy).

    There's a lot of body-shaming when it comes to female fashion particularly, with retailers setting ludicrously unrealistic "standards" when it comes to models and sizes. Having said that, I find a lot of the "body positivity" stuff goes too far into the realm of fat normalisation - some of these body positivity, plus size models are simply trying to justify being unhealthily huge. But if a young girl is told she has to fit into a size 6, or feels compelled to aspire to these models that sell the clothes, that's equally not OK.

    My wife and I were having a chat yesterday about sizes/pricing of clothing in the wake of the storm New Look have found themselves caught up in. They were charging more for larger sizes of the same top, and they've been slammed for it. They argue that more material is required to create the larger sizes, and their margins have been increasingly reduced as no longer do the smaller sizes supplement the larger ones in terms of cost (i.e., you don't get a reduction in clothing cost for being small, so having a flat rate used to balance out before the proportion of the population taking larger sizes increased).

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    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by calumhibee1 View Post
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    I agree with the last paragraph. There was an article on fb where the top comment was a woman saying how women who are size 14-20 are normal and 12 and below are skinny, which just simply isnít the case as much as some people will hate to hear it.
    It is the case in this country nowadays. Unfortunately

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    Quote Originally Posted by 21.05.2016 View Post
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    What a nanny state we're becoming. Give people the information and the facts about what the risks are of eating too much junk, drinking too much, smoking etc. but let people make decisions for themselves.
    I detest the lazy tabloid expression, "nanny state".

    The government's job is to bring in legislation to protect its citizens and to use raised taxation wisely.

    Obesity is costing the NHS billions. Free choice is costing the country billions.

    Why is alcohol restricted to over 18s? Should that law be changed?

    You could take the " free choice" argument to ridiculous lengths, like speeding, gun control, class A drugs. Why not make driving on the left an individual's choice?

    Laws are made for the benefit of society. If you want a pizza, you'll still be able to get one.
    Last edited by Hibbyradge; 16-05-2018 at 09:11 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibbyradge View Post
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    I detest the lazy tabloid expression, "nanny state".

    The government's job is to bring in legislation to protect its citizens and to use raised taxation wisely.

    Obesity is costing the NHS billions. Free choice is costing the country billions.

    Why is alcohol restricted to over 18s? Should that law be changed?

    You could take the " free choice" argument to ridiculous lengths, like speeding, gun control, class A drugs. Why not make driving on the left an individual's choice?

    Laws are made for the benefit of society. If you want a pizza, you'll still be able to get one.
    I'd agree with all of that. It's very similar to the debate about alcohol pricing.

    On the flip side, there's also a case for Governments taking the so-called sugar-tax, and using it to subsidise producers of healthy foods. Much of the issue is that lower-income families can't afford them.
    Last edited by CropleyWasGod; 16-05-2018 at 09:28 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sylar View Post
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    There's such an element of "snobbery" about it, but we do drastically need to do something to reduce our waistlines generally in this country!

    Jamie Oliver attacked Dominos recently about their calorific content etc - having said that, here's a comparison between a margherita pizza at both places:

    Dietary Info Dominos Jamie's Italian
    Calories 744 839
    Fat 22 33
    Salt 3.5 3
    Sugar 11 10

    Is it OK that this is the dietary info for a pizza in his restaurant because it's a sit-down experience and slightly more posh than a takeaway?

    I 100% support efforts to tackle obesity, especially in younger children, but it needs to be a strategic approach - not a sledgehammer, nannying approach. As someone else pointed out on the alcohol thread, there are plenty of places around Europe where cheap booze exists but not the problems we see here. The same is true of junk food. Education is what's needed, not a mandated "thou shall not".


    Not sure where you got your dominos numbers?

    From their website: https://corporate.dominos.co.uk/Medi...Mozzarella.pdf

    An original cheese and tomato on classic crust with regular mozzarella is given as 516 calories for a portion from a medium pizza. However, that's 3 slices and the pizza is 8, so the actual pizza is 1376 calories.

    An authentic Italian pizza at 839 calories would be a reasonably healthy meal I would've thought (although I've never been in a Jamie's Italian). It's when you start doing Americanised things like deep pan, stuffed crust etc, that they get ridiculous.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NAE NOOKIE View Post
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    Anyway .... my advice to anybody on here under 40 is to start saving or investing in as good a private pension as you can possibly afford and advise your kids to do the same, because this headlong rush to force everybody to live to be 100 years old means you'll probably be lucky to qualify for a state pension at 80 ... enjoy your ridiculously long working life
    I wouldn't worry about living too long. The Tories are only looking for a source of Soylent Green.

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    Coaching Staff Sylar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeMeSouviens View Post
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    Not sure where you got your dominos numbers?

    From their website: https://corporate.dominos.co.uk/Medi...Mozzarella.pdf

    An original cheese and tomato on classic crust with regular mozzarella is given as 516 calories for a portion from a medium pizza. However, that's 3 slices and the pizza is 8, so the actual pizza is 1376 calories.

    An authentic Italian pizza at 839 calories would be a reasonably healthy meal I would've thought (although I've never been in a Jamie's Italian). It's when you start doing Americanised things like deep pan, stuffed crust etc, that they get ridiculous.
    I should have stressed in my own post that the analysis isn't mine - it was based on numbers put together by James Wong - I think it was based on a thin crust, tomato based pizza.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibbyradge View Post
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    I detest the lazy tabloid expression, "nanny state".

    The government's job is to bring in legislation to protect its citizens and to use raised taxation wisely.

    Obesity is costing the NHS billions. Free choice is costing the country billions.

    Why is alcohol restricted to over 18s? Should that law be changed?

    You could take the " free choice" argument to ridiculous lengths, like speeding, gun control, class A drugs. Why not make driving on the left an individual's choice?

    Laws are made for the benefit of society. If you want a pizza, you'll still be able to get one.
    Its a fair point mate, but lets face it the examples you cite are all things where innocent parties would suffer if laws were not in place to make them illegal. If you want to take on the obesity crisis then instead of making sugary drinks and pizza more expensive why not make it illegal for anybody under 25 to own an X box or eccess Netflix ...... when I was a kid 40 odd years ago it was still possible to eat pizza buy sugary drinks and stuff your face with as many sweets as you wanted but fat kids were few and far between.

    The difference was we didn't all sit in front of a computer or TV screen all day and we walked to school, we didn't get dropped at the door by mummy and daddy .... its a shame we all have to suffer because too many ( far from all ) kids don't take any exercise ..... FFS when I was a kid the loudest sound in the area around 8 or 9 at night was kids parents shouting for them to get their backsides home.

    On a separate note ....... We have a Dominos in Galashiels and I've seen their prices ... bloody hell, anybody willing to pay that for a bloomin' pizza needs help with their mental health, never mind their physical health

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibbyradge View Post
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    I detest the lazy tabloid expression, "nanny state".

    The government's job is to bring in legislation to protect its citizens and to use raised taxation wisely.

    Obesity is costing the NHS billions. Free choice is costing the country billions.

    Why is alcohol restricted to over 18s? Should that law be changed?

    You could take the " free choice" argument to ridiculous lengths, like speeding, gun control, class A drugs. Why not make driving on the left an individual's choice?

    Laws are made for the benefit of society. If you want a pizza, you'll still be able to get one.
    Well said Radge

    It's pretty obvious society would continually shoot itself in the foot if left unregulated and unchecked.

    Nobody's stopping anyone from getting a pizza - all the government are trying to do is deter people.

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    Denmark has already tried and abolished a pizza tax (well it was a fat tax that captured pizzas). It was abolished as they found the measures difficult to administer and that they had failed to have the intended effect.

    Iím all for a healthier nation but these specific taxes are already proven to be pretty useless at achieving what they are being touted for.

    That said I was at the airport recently and while sipping a beer I was watching the hordes of humanity going back and forth and it struck me just how many people were overweight....it was truly quite amazing.

    Iím not sure what the answer is but there is probably a cultural and educational element to it. Yet as some have said Iíve read more and more recently about how fat people should be considered Ďnormalí (from a size perspective) so Iím thinking that actually the cultural element appears to be, if anything, going the wrong way. There was a specific piece on he BBC app not that long ago basically supporting the fact that the women, who were 15st and more, should be supported for their choice to be huge and that any negative comments around their weight was a problem of perception.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
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    Denmark has already tried and abolished a pizza tax (well it was a fat tax that captured pizzas). It was abolished as they found the measures difficult to administer and that they had failed to have the intended effect.

    Iím all for a healthier nation but these specific taxes are already proven to be pretty useless at achieving what they are being touted for.

    That said I was at the airport recently and while sipping a beer I was watching the hordes of humanity going back and forth and it struck me just how many people were overweight....it was truly quite amazing.

    Iím not sure what the answer is but there is probably a cultural and educational element to it. Yet as some have said Iíve read more and more recently about how fat people should be considered Ďnormalí (from a size perspective) so Iím thinking that actually the cultural element appears to be, if anything, going the wrong way. There was a specific piece on he BBC app not that long ago basically supporting the fact that the women, who were 15st and more, should be supported for their choice to be huge and that any negative comments around their weight was a problem of perception.
    I was in Las Vegas for a couple of days last year. After that, it really doesn't seem so bad here.

  20. #19
    What is the specific proposal here anyway? Has Scot gov actually announced anything?

    One thing I would make mandatory is clearer labelling, eg. packaged foods and takeaway/restaurant menus should say in clear, readably sized print beside each item how many calories it contains. And not some fudged notion of calories/portion where the portion size is a 1/3 of the bottle or something. The actual number of calories in the item as sold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeMeSouviens View Post
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    What is the specific proposal here anyway? Has Scot gov actually announced anything?

    One thing I would make mandatory is clearer labelling, eg. packaged foods and takeaway/restaurant menus should say in clear, readably sized print beside each item how many calories it contains. And not some fudged notion of calories/portion where the portion size is a 1/3 of the bottle or something. The actual number of calories in the item as sold.
    This, I like the Kafoodle app for such information. It's up to the restaurants to provide the info, the Vittoria Group and La Favorita has every dish and pizza on there giving you calorific info for total dish.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    What are peopleís thoughts on what is likely to be a highly emotive subject.

    Personally I am a big supporter of Jamie Oliver and his mission to reduce child obesity and in turn obesity in general.

    I know many others disagree with it for a variety of reasons.

    PS i know itís not a pizza tax but itís quite an eye catching title

    My issue is that we are very strongly condemned when we make a generalisations about sections of society, yet the government is quite happy to lump us altogether, for no other reason than, to avoid having to call individuals out for their lifestyle choices.

    I am sick of being treated like an overweight alcoholic. Call people out where necessary. If I was harming children I should be held to account, parents of fat kids should be offered support an if they don't respond, some other action should be taken. i.e. Dietician, counsellor, shopper, ration book type thing.

    "We don't want to hurt their feelings" shouldn't really come into it.

  23. #22
    [QUOTE=RyeSloan;5407178]Denmark has already tried and abolished a pizza tax (well it was a fat tax that captured pizzas). It was abolished as they found the measures difficult to administer and that they had failed to have the intended effect.

    Iím all for a healthier nation but these specific taxes are already proven to be pretty useless at achieving what they are being touted for.

    That said I was at the airport recently and while sipping a beer I was watching the hordes of humanity going back and forth and it struck me just how many people were overweight....it was truly quite amazing.

    Iím not sure what the answer is but there is probably a cultural and educational element to it. Yet as some have said Iíve read more and more recently about how fat people should be considered Ďnormalí (from a size perspective) so Iím thinking that actually the cultural element appears to be, if anything, going the wrong way. There was a specific piece on he BBC app not that long ago basically supporting the fact that the women, who were 15st and more, should be supported for their choice to be huge and that any negative comments around their weight was a problem of perception.[/QUOTE]

    The problem summed up right there. Short sighted selfishness.

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    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NAE NOOKIE View Post
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    Its a fair point mate, but lets face it the examples you cite are all things where innocent parties would suffer if laws were not in place to make them illegal. If you want to take on the obesity crisis then instead of making sugary drinks and pizza more expensive why not make it illegal for anybody under 25 to own an X box or eccess Netflix ...... when I was a kid 40 odd years ago it was still possible to eat pizza buy sugary drinks and stuff your face with as many sweets as you wanted but fat kids were few and far between.

    The difference was we didn't all sit in front of a computer or TV screen all day and we walked to school, we didn't get dropped at the door by mummy and daddy .... its a shame we all have to suffer because too many ( far from all ) kids don't take any exercise ..... FFS when I was a kid the loudest sound in the area around 8 or 9 at night was kids parents shouting for them to get their backsides home.

    On a separate note ....... We have a Dominos in Galashiels and I've seen their prices ... bloody hell, anybody willing to pay that for a bloomin' pizza needs help with their mental health, never mind their physical health
    A lot of good conversation on here, majority of it supporting the changes and a lot of it seeing the trend of our overweight nation.

    A good idea that I agree with is subsidising the healthier food.

    But with this particular point, I donít see a whole lot of kids but from the ones I do, I would say obesity is a much more wide spread issue in adults. A lot of whom were probably in the bracket you mentioned above.

    Food is essential. You need to have good knowledge and a healthy relationship with it.
    Exercise or not.

    Start with eating well and build from there.

    I agree exercise is essential but I would wager if someone ate healthily and had a semi sedentary lifestyle they would be healthier than someone who ate crap and exercised all the time.

    Being healthy is not a matter of being fat or skinny, you can be skinny and unhealthy. It still has a bad effect on your body.

    We live in a world where sweeties have their own massive aisle in supermarkets. Same with crisps.

    There is a lot if progress to be made here and thankfully we are making in roads

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    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=beensaidbefore;5407219]
    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
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    Denmark has already tried and abolished a pizza tax (well it was a fat tax that captured pizzas). It was abolished as they found the measures difficult to administer and that they had failed to have the intended effect.

    Iím all for a healthier nation but these specific taxes are already proven to be pretty useless at achieving what they are being touted for.

    That said I was at the airport recently and while sipping a beer I was watching the hordes of humanity going back and forth and it struck me just how many people were overweight....it was truly quite amazing.

    Iím not sure what the answer is but there is probably a cultural and educational element to it. Yet as some have said Iíve read more and more recently about how fat people should be considered Ďnormalí (from a size perspective) so Iím thinking that actually the cultural element appears to be, if anything, going the wrong way. There was a specific piece on he BBC app not that long ago basically supporting the fact that the women, who were 15st and more, should be supported for their choice to be huge and that any negative comments around their weight was a problem of perception.[/QUOTE]

    The problem summed up right there. Short sighted selfishness.
    It is a huge problem this.

    I get very irked when there is outrage about folk being made to feel like being overweight is wrong.

    A women had a kid a few years ago and she was a gym heid. Within a few weeks she was back in the gym and posted a photo of it. Her washboard stomach was back and she got shamed. It was mental.

    How is that an issue? A lot of folk donít have bodies like that, that is fair enough but for people to lay into her because she was in the gym and looking good, and it may make them feel down is mental.

    If they were fit people who went to the gym but never had a ripped stomach they would be happy. This women obviously hardcores it. But those who do a normal amount, and their body represents that would be fine with her looming that way.

    That is a totally different thing from models developing eating disorders and things like that of course.

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    My issue is that we are very strongly condemned when we make a generalisations about sections of society, yet the government is quite happy to lump us altogether, for no other reason than, to avoid having to call individuals out for their lifestyle choices.

    I am sick of being treated like an overweight alcoholic. Call people out where necessary. If I was harming children I should be held to account, parents of fat kids should be offered support an if they don't respond, some other action should be taken. i.e. Dietician, counsellor, shopper, ration book type thing.

    "We don't want to hurt their feelings" shouldn't really come into it.
    totally. Body shaming should be a recognised Olympic sport, with generous Lottery grants going to those who show outstanding promise at it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    I would wager if someone ate healthily and had a semi sedentary lifestyle they would be healthier than someone who ate crap and exercised all the time.
    I'll take that bet. If you lead an active physical life your body can deal with all sorts of crap. Most of the children referred to in a previous post who used to need shouted in at nightfall from their games (often fitba, typically poised at 42 or 43-all) ate more lard than broccoli!

  27. #26
    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lapsedhibee View Post
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    totally. Body shaming should be a recognised Olympic sport, with generous Lottery grants going to those who show outstanding promise at it.



    I'll take that bet. If you lead an active physical life your body can deal with all sorts of crap. Most of the children referred to in a previous post who used to need shouted in at nightfall from their games (often fitba, typically poised at 42 or 43-all) ate more lard than broccoli!
    Not that it can be proved but iíd like to see a persons quality of life between the two comparisons.

    How are those said folk getting on now?
    Still eating lard?
    Still out playing football at night?

    Iíd bet most are overweight now. And unhealthy.

    Your veg munchers though...

  28. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    Not that it can be proved but i’d like to see a persons quality of life between the two comparisons.

    How are those said folk getting on now?
    Still eating lard?
    Still out playing football at night?

    I’d bet most are overweight now. And unhealthy.

    Your veg munchers though...
    The ones that have continued to be active (gardening and hillwalking rather than football when you're 70/80/90) are fine, thin as rakes.
    The ones who gave up all sport/exercise and now spend their Saturday afternoons in the supermarket reading the packaging on fancy plants flown in from the other side of the world (or "superfoods" as they call them), zzzzzzzzzz .....

  29. #28
    My opinion is Jamie Oliver wants to look at his own unhealthy weight fluctuations before sticking his nose into other people's business.
    PM Awards General Poster of The Year 2015, 2016, 2017. Probably robbed in other years

  30. #29
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    My wife is a teacher. She says that the kids, on the whole, when given responsibility for their own lunch almost always select horrendously unhealthy choices. Now whilst that may not lead to being overweight it still leads to them being unhealthy which is not good.
    The other consequence is that going down the unhealthy route could be seen to be behaviour-forming. As the children become adults and their metabolisms start to change I suspect many will find those behavious do pile the pounds on.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

  31. #30
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Trager View Post
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    What are peopleís thoughts on what is likely to be a highly emotive subject.

    Personally I am a big supporter of Jamie Oliver and his mission to reduce child obesity and in turn obesity in general.

    I know many others disagree with it for a variety of reasons.

    PS i know itís not a pizza tax but itís quite an eye catching title
    I make my own pizzas - using Jamieís recipe!

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