hibs.net Messageboard

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 85
  1. #31
    Coaching Staff Sylar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Lanark/Palo Alto
    Age
    32
    Posts
    14,558
    Gamer IDs

    Gamertag: sjmcg1304
    I joined the March for our Lives event in San Francisco back in March, and I swear those kids gave me hope that perhaps the US wasn't entirely ****ed.

    But since then, everything got real quite again, as it always does. And then this happens.

    Still, the guns were legally owned and illegally obtained by the shooter. No doubt the dad is the real villain here for not better securing his firearms

    If only the teachers...


  2. Log in to remove the advert

  3. #32
    @hibs.net private member lord bunberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    edinburgh
    Posts
    12,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Hibrandenburg View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm pretty disappointed at myself for not giving a ****. But at some point you just have to accept that the Americans love their guns more than they love their children and there's nothing we can do about it.
    I feel sorry for the minority who can see that banning guns would make them all safer. I suppose you would have to live there to understand the reasons, but from the outside looking in itís ****in madness that they use arguments like if everyone had guns this wouldnít happen.

    GIRLS DONT LIKE BOYS GIRLS LIKE SIMON MURRAY

  4. #33
    Coaching Staff 21.05.2016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    8,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Hibrandenburg View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm pretty disappointed at myself for not giving a ****. But at some point you just have to accept that the Americans love their guns more than they love their children and there's nothing we can do about it.
    Exactly. Some people you just can't change the mind set of. The constitution is clearly more important than people's lives sadly.

    It really doesn't get much worse than children being murdered in their classroom yet even that won't make some people see sense so what chance do you have really.

  5. #34
    @hibs.net private member Alex Trager's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Easter Road
    Age
    26
    Posts
    4,461
    They have genuine, and I mean genuine, fears that the govt may oppress them if their guns are taken from them. My uncle lives over there and he says thatís always an argument they use.
    Itís a crazy innate fear that they have over there of the government. Itís mental truly.

  6. #35
    @hibs.net private member calumhibee1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    6,042
    Quote Originally Posted by Hibrandenburg View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm pretty disappointed at myself for not giving a ****. But at some point you just have to accept that the Americans love their guns more than they love their children and there's nothing we can do about it.
    Same here. I heard it and didnít really bat an eyelid which shouldnít be the case.

  7. #36
    @hibs.net private member NORTHERNHIBBY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Last Train to Skaville
    Age
    53
    Posts
    10,087
    Headline in today's Daily News in the US as discussed by Simon Scharma is a stark front page using the Royal Wedding for context.

  8. #37
    Testimonial Due Dinkydoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Dumfries
    Age
    28
    Posts
    2,567
    Gamer IDs

    Gamertag: Dinkydoo1875
    There is going to be an entire generation of people who's memory of high school was fearing that something like this is going to happen to your school, during their time there.

    These people will all be able to vote soon.

    The tide will turn.

  9. #38
    Arming more teachers could help tackle gunmen targeting students if there were "four to five guns to one", a senior Texan official has said.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-44187718


  10. #40
    @hibs.net private member Off the bar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Hackney no more
    Posts
    2,116
    More US school kids have died violently than US military personnel this year



    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.d00fb687c562


    ''Bring on the porn star''

  11. #41
    @hibs.net private member Off the bar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Hackney no more
    Posts
    2,116
    Another hugely depressing and completely avoidable story

    https://www.ohio.com/akron/news/loca...ear-old-cousin


    ''Bring on the porn star''

  12. #42
    Another mass shooting in the US. This time in Florida. Multiple fatalities being reported.

  13. #43
    @hibs.net private member Hibbyradge's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    1000's of people's Barcelona
    Posts
    35,943
    Thoughts and prayers.
    Buy nothing online unless you check for free cashback here first. I've already earned £1,789.68!



  14. #44
    Private Members Prediction League Winner Hibrandenburg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Brandenburg
    Age
    53
    Posts
    10,245
    Quote Originally Posted by theonlywayisup View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Another mass shooting in the US. This time in Florida. Multiple fatalities being reported.
    Past caring, if they can't care for themselves then why should I?

  15. #45
    @hibs.net private member Hibs Class's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    5,383
    Quote Originally Posted by Hibbyradge View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Thoughts and prayers.
    Maybe Trump has seen the futility of sending thoughts and prayers. In the aftermath of yesterday's shooting he has stayed silent and instead tweeted his interpretation of his approval ratings and described himself as "your all time favourite (I hope) president".
    ​#PERSEVERED


  16. #46
    Left by mutual consent!
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    A perpetual situation comedy.
    Posts
    763
    If they ban gun ownership tomorrow, who will hand in the guns, the good guys or the bad guys?

    I wish I knew the answer, as it's a legitimate argument from the gun lobby.

  17. #47
    I only want to say the Scottish Cup is in the bag... Sir David Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    33,610
    Quote Originally Posted by Chic Murray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    If they ban gun ownership tomorrow, who will hand in the guns, the good guys or the bad guys?

    I wish I knew the answer, as it's a legitimate argument from the gun lobby.
    It's an argument but I'm not sure it's a good argument.

    If gun ownership was banned tomorrow, of course it would be the bad guys who would hold onto their firearms but that cannot be an argument for not changing the law.

    If it was made illegal, that would mean no more new firearms would be sold freely at supermarket stores. It would also mean that no more ammunition would be sold freely at supermarket stores which would make it harder for the bad guys to restock the firearms which are already in existence. If the guns don't hold any ammunition then they can't kill anyone.

    I can't see any negatives to restricting gun ownership in the USA. The status quo is clearly not working.

    There have apparently been around 9,500 gun related deaths in the USA in 2018 already and there's still more than 4 months to go until the end of the year.

    That is a shocking statistic and the fact that not one major politician in the USA, with any real influence, is campaigning to change things is utterly shameful.
    HIBERNIAN F.C. - SCOTTISH CUP WINNERS 2016

    21.05.2016

  18. #48
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Age
    41
    Posts
    7,959
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir David Gray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    It's an argument but I'm not sure it's a good argument.

    If gun ownership was banned tomorrow, of course it would be the bad guys who would hold onto their firearms but that cannot be an argument for not changing the law.

    If it was made illegal, that would mean no more new firearms would be sold freely at supermarket stores. It would also mean that no more ammunition would be sold freely at supermarket stores which would make it harder for the bad guys to restock the firearms which are already in existence. If the guns don't hold any ammunition then they can't kill anyone.

    I can't see any negatives to restricting gun ownership in the USA. The status quo is clearly not working.

    There have apparently been around 9,500 gun related deaths in the USA in 2018 already and there's still more than 4 months to go until the end of the year.

    That is a shocking statistic and the fact that not one major politician in the USA, with any real influence, is campaigning to change things is utterly shameful.
    Yep.

    I don't think it's practical to think you just wave a wand and America's gun issues disappear at a stroke. There will continue to be illegal guns, there will continue to be problems and incidents for a while until the effects of changes filter through.

    That's not a good reason not to make change, and you have to start somewhere. Many of the deaths to which you refer will have been caused by legally owned guns. Restricting or getting rid of those ones will at least have some effect.

    It'll never happen though.
    Last edited by Smartie; 27-08-2018 at 12:27 PM.

  19. #49
    Left by mutual consent!
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    A perpetual situation comedy.
    Posts
    763
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir David Gray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    It's an argument but I'm not sure it's a good argument.

    If gun ownership was banned tomorrow, of course it would be the bad guys who would hold onto their firearms but that cannot be an argument for not changing the law.

    If it was made illegal, that would mean no more new firearms would be sold freely at supermarket stores. It would also mean that no more ammunition would be sold freely at supermarket stores which would make it harder for the bad guys to restock the firearms which are already in existence. If the guns don't hold any ammunition then they can't kill anyone.

    I can't see any negatives to restricting gun ownership in the USA. The status quo is clearly not working.

    There have apparently been around 9,500 gun related deaths in the USA in 2018 already and there's still more than 4 months to go until the end of the year.

    That is a shocking statistic and the fact that not one major politician in the USA, with any real influence, is campaigning to change things is utterly shameful.
    Yes, and how many gun related deaths were there in Northern Ireland during the troubles - in a state where owning a gun was illegal.

    You've just said that the bad guys would hold onto their guns, and then go on to say you can't find any negatives in banning them,, by the way. I can see one immediately.

    I agree with the broad principle of banning guns in the USA, but can see massive logistical problems in achieving it.

    Also, you say the status quo is not working. However, we need to consider the number of people who do use guns appropriately, such as farmers, and people living in remote areas. They have a genuine need to have weapons.

    I'm playing devil's advocate to an extent. I'm sure it can be done, with careful planning, but it will take a very long time.

    During that time, there will be many incidents where people will say "if we were still allowed to have a gun, that wouldn't have happened." Think about the capital punishment debate in the UK for a parallel, as to how keeping the public onside is important.

    Now, capital punishment in the US. That's something that could be stopped tomorrow, but that's another story.

  20. #50
    I only want to say the Scottish Cup is in the bag... Sir David Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    33,610
    Quote Originally Posted by Chic Murray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Yes, and how many gun related deaths were there in Northern Ireland during the troubles - in a state where owning a gun was illegal.

    You've just said that the bad guys would hold onto their guns, and then go on to say you can't find any negatives in banning them,, by the way. I can see one immediately.

    I agree with the broad principle of banning guns in the USA, but can see massive logistical problems in achieving it.

    Also, you say the status quo is not working. However, we need to consider the number of people who do use guns appropriately, such as farmers, and people living in remote areas. They have a genuine need to have weapons.

    I'm playing devil's advocate to an extent. I'm sure it can be done, with careful planning, but it will take a very long time.

    During that time, there will be many incidents where people will say "if we were still allowed to have a gun, that wouldn't have happened." Think about the capital punishment debate in the UK for a parallel, as to how keeping the public onside is important.

    Now, capital punishment in the US. That's something that could be stopped tomorrow, but that's another story.
    On the subject of Northern Ireland, it has separate firearms legislation to the rest of the UK which is much less restrictive than Great Britain.

    Of course the bad guys would be the ones who would hold onto their guns but if it was made illegal, or at least less legal than it is just now, then the police would have the power to confiscate the firearms that they come across. They would be able to raid properties after a tip off etc. At the moment they can do very little about it as those who own firearms are usually within the law.

    You say that certain people need to have access to guns, such as farmers. Give me one good reason why it would work any differently in the USA compared with the UK. We have one of the lowest rates of gun related deaths in the world but we still allow certain members of society to own a firearm.

    The USA's approach to guns is both reckless and irresponsible and all for some ridiculous notion that they are upholding some law from over 200 years ago.
    HIBERNIAN F.C. - SCOTTISH CUP WINNERS 2016

    21.05.2016

  21. #51
    Left by mutual consent!
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    A perpetual situation comedy.
    Posts
    763
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir David Gray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    On the subject of Northern Ireland, it has separate firearms legislation to the rest of the UK which is much less restrictive than Great Britain.

    Of course the bad guys would be the ones who would hold onto their guns but if it was made illegal, or at least less legal than it is just now, then the police would have the power to confiscate the firearms that they come across. They would be able to raid properties after a tip off etc. At the moment they can do very little about it as those who own firearms are usually within the law.

    You say that certain people need to have access to guns, such as farmers. Give me one good reason why it would work any differently in the USA compared with the UK. We have one of the lowest rates of gun related deaths in the world but we still allow certain members of society to own a firearm.

    The USA's approach to guns is both reckless and irresponsible and all for some ridiculous notion that they are upholding some law from over 200 years ago.
    It would work differently in the US from the UK because the US is not the UK. They may well be holding onto laws from 200 odd years ago, but they are their laws, and it is their history, to call an ideal ridiculous because it doesn't fit in with our views is naive, and is pretty much the approach that we criticise the Americans for.

    The thing that puzzles me, more than anything, is why does any of this bother us in Britain, and what does it actually have to do with us? Other than being able to cite US gun crime as a reason for not allowing our citizens to bear arms, I can't see why it is relevant to so many people in the UK.

    I know when the alt.right started to get involved in debates about public health care in the UK, I found it grossly offensive that they could contribute so much, with so little understanding of the subject. I think the shoe is on the other foot here, and it is something we should leave Americans to get on with, and limit ourselves to scratching our heads as to how they got into that mess.

    I accept that the difficulty in affecting the change that a section of the US population wants is not a reason for them campaigning for that change. At the same time, us at a distance should be wary of whose side we jump in on.

  22. #52
    @hibs.net private member Sergio sledge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Inverness
    Age
    34
    Posts
    3,091
    Quote Originally Posted by Chic Murray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Yes, and how many gun related deaths were there in Northern Ireland during the troubles - in a state where owning a gun was illegal.

    You've just said that the bad guys would hold onto their guns, and then go on to say you can't find any negatives in banning them,, by the way. I can see one immediately.

    I agree with the broad principle of banning guns in the USA, but can see massive logistical problems in achieving it.

    Also, you say the status quo is not working. However, we need to consider the number of people who do use guns appropriately, such as farmers, and people living in remote areas. They have a genuine need to have weapons.

    I'm playing devil's advocate to an extent. I'm sure it can be done, with careful planning, but it will take a very long time.

    During that time, there will be many incidents where people will say "if we were still allowed to have a gun, that wouldn't have happened." Think about the capital punishment debate in the UK for a parallel, as to how keeping the public onside is important.

    Now, capital punishment in the US. That's something that could be stopped tomorrow, but that's another story.
    The UK and Austrailia are two countries which (in living memory for a lot of people) instroduced gun legislation in the wake of attacks. Both countries would have had the same percieved issue where honest people turned guns in but criminals didn't.

    Far from causing the ordinary person to be in more danger, shootings are (for the most part) crime related in the UK now with very little danger to the general population from gun crime.

    As someone else has said, the reducing availability of ammunition and the fact that police would be able to seize guns (which they couldn't currently as they are held legally) from "bad people" when they are found would lead to a reduction in danger to the general public.

    The problem that the USA probably has is that it has land borders with countries where ammunition and guns may be more readily available, however it seems to me that the kind of people that will go to the trouble of obtaining guns illegally and smuggling them in over the border from another country are also less likely to be the sort of person who would cause a school shooting or random shooting at a music festival, so at the very least it would lead to a reduction in these sort of incidents.

  23. #53
    First Team Breakthrough mvteng's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by Hibs Class View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Maybe Trump has seen the futility of sending thoughts and prayers. In the aftermath of yesterday's shooting he has stayed silent and instead tweeted his interpretation of his approval ratings and described himself as "your all time favourite (I hope) president".
    Saw a tweet earlier that you can guess the colour of the shooter based on the length of time after the shooting that Trump tweets.
    No tweet = white shooter

  24. #54
    I only want to say the Scottish Cup is in the bag... Sir David Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    33,610
    Quote Originally Posted by Sergio sledge View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    The UK and Austrailia are two countries which (in living memory for a lot of people) instroduced gun legislation in the wake of attacks. Both countries would have had the same percieved issue where honest people turned guns in but criminals didn't.

    Far from causing the ordinary person to be in more danger, shootings are (for the most part) crime related in the UK now with very little danger to the general population from gun crime.

    As someone else has said, the reducing availability of ammunition and the fact that police would be able to seize guns (which they couldn't currently as they are held legally) from "bad people" when they are found would lead to a reduction in danger to the general public.

    The problem that the USA probably has is that it has land borders with countries where ammunition and guns may be more readily available, however it seems to me that the kind of people that will go to the trouble of obtaining guns illegally and smuggling them in over the border from another country are also less likely to be the sort of person who would cause a school shooting or random shooting at a music festival, so at the very least it would lead to a reduction in these sort of incidents.
    I agree with the majority of your post but in terms of the USA having a land border with Mexico and therefore maybe finding it difficult to control guns coming across the border, Canada doesn't seem to have that problem. They have, by comparison, very little gun related deaths each year and have laws in place to restrict gun ownership which seems to work to a large extent.

    You will never stop guns falling into the wrong hands, no matter how strict the laws are. However the alternative cannot be to allow the USA version of Tesco and Asda to be selling guns to pretty much anyone that wants one.
    HIBERNIAN F.C. - SCOTTISH CUP WINNERS 2016

    21.05.2016

  25. #55
    First Team Breakthrough
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Chic Murray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    It would work differently in the US from the UK because the US is not the UK. They may well be holding onto laws from 200 odd years ago, but they are their laws, and it is their history, to call an ideal ridiculous because it doesn't fit in with our views is naive, and is pretty much the approach that we criticise the Americans for.

    The thing that puzzles me, more than anything, is why does any of this bother us in Britain, and what does it actually have to do with us? Other than being able to cite US gun crime as a reason for not allowing our citizens to bear arms, I can't see why it is relevant to so many people in the UK.

    I know when the alt.right started to get involved in debates about public health care in the UK, I found it grossly offensive that they could contribute so much, with so little understanding of the subject. I think the shoe is on the other foot here, and it is something we should leave Americans to get on with, and limit ourselves to scratching our heads as to how they got into that mess.

    I accept that the difficulty in affecting the change that a section of the US population wants is not a reason for them campaigning for that change. At the same time, us at a distance should be wary of whose side we jump in on.
    For my part, its partly because I have a daughter studying in the US, but even if I didn't it's surely not a strange thing to be interested/concerned about a country with whom we have massive cultural and historical ties? The extension of your thought is that we should care nothing beyond our borders. Where do you draw the line? i don't really care about what happens in Wales or Lincolnshire for example.

    Anyway, on your earlier point about it being a difficult thing for the Americans do, of course it would be. There would almost certainly be incidents and deaths as a result of any such action, but when the alternative is to do nothing, that is just a cowardly kicking of the problem into the long grass.

  26. #56
    Left by mutual consent!
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    A perpetual situation comedy.
    Posts
    763
    Quote Originally Posted by Ozymandias View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    For my part, its partly because I have a daughter studying in the US, but even if I didn't it's surely not a strange thing to be interested/concerned about a country with whom we have massive cultural and historical ties? The extension of your thought is that we should care nothing beyond our borders. Where do you draw the line? i don't really care about what happens in Wales or Lincolnshire for example.

    Anyway, on your earlier point about it being a difficult thing for the Americans do, of course it would be. There would almost certainly be incidents and deaths as a result of any such action, but when the alternative is to do nothing, that is just a cowardly kicking of the problem into the long grass.
    Of course, it's just that we seem to worry about it a lot more than the average American, and I imagine our opinions don't hold much water over there. We often forget, or just don't appreciate, what a backward/undeveloped country America is.

  27. #57
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Age
    41
    Posts
    7,959
    Quote Originally Posted by Chic Murray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Of course, it's just that we seem to worry about it a lot more than the average American, and I imagine our opinions don't hold much water over there. We often forget, or just don't appreciate, what a backward/undeveloped country America is.
    I think most folk have an empathetic side to their nature and don't like to see unnecessary suffering anywhere, irrespective of nationality.

    The advantage we have is that following the last mass shooting on these shores we tightened up the laws on handguns - and in more than 20 years since, we've not had any similar attacks. Attackers are having to be creative, by using vehicles and complicated bombs as it is so difficult to get hold of the type of weapon that makes attacks easy.

    And I don't necessarily agree that America is backward or undeveloped - I view it as being similar to Scotland - horribly unequal, wonderful culture, desperate poverty in places, many fantastic people and wonderful traits and some head scratching stupidity.

  28. #58
    First Team Breakthrough
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Chic Murray View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Of course, it's just that we seem to worry about it a lot more than the average American, and I imagine our opinions don't hold much water over there. We often forget, or just don't appreciate, what a backward/undeveloped country America is.
    I don't think that is strictly true. Those who are interested in it over here discuss, those who aren't, don't. I think it is seldom a topic of conversation, other than in the aftermath of a mass shooting, and even then decreasingly so as the horror reduces in direct proportion to the increase in incidents.

    I think it is much more to the fore in the States. It is regularly discussed across news channels, from generally pro- 2nd amendment campaigners on Fox to the more liberal mainstream outlets. As with everything in the Trump era though, the debate is increasingly polarised and the opportunity for consensus politics diminished, despite a consistent large approval for gun control measures.

  29. #59
    Left by mutual consent!
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    A perpetual situation comedy.
    Posts
    763
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartie View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I think most folk have an empathetic side to their nature and don't like to see unnecessary suffering anywhere, irrespective of nationality.

    The advantage we have is that following the last mass shooting on these shores we tightened up the laws on handguns - and in more than 20 years since, we've not had any similar attacks. Attackers are having to be creative, by using vehicles and complicated bombs as it is so difficult to get hold of the type of weapon that makes attacks easy.

    And I don't necessarily agree that America is backward or undeveloped - I view it as being similar to Scotland - horribly unequal, wonderful culture, desperate poverty in places, many fantastic people and wonderful traits and some head scratching stupidity.
    Comparing it to Scotland is setting the bar pretty low though. :duck

    My point about us worrying about what the citizens of a democratic society chose to do with their lives (and deaths) is a bit strange when there are much greater humanitarian disasters to be worrying about.

    As for tightening up laws on handguns, the interesting thing there is how many attacks like Dunblane happened in the 20 years before. The legislation was largely cosmetic, because there is no gun culture in this country.

    I am not saying that Americans shouldn't ban guns, I am saying it is going to be a long time until there is a culture change. At the end of the day, the right to have a gun, and self resilience are at the heart of their culture IMO.

  30. #60
    Left by mutual consent!
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    A perpetual situation comedy.
    Posts
    763
    Quote Originally Posted by Ozymandias View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I don't think that is strictly true. Those who are interested in it over here discuss, those who aren't, don't. I think it is seldom a topic of conversation, other than in the aftermath of a mass shooting, and even then decreasingly so as the horror reduces in direct proportion to the increase in incidents.

    I think it is much more to the fore in the States. It is regularly discussed across news channels, from generally pro- 2nd amendment campaigners on Fox to the more liberal mainstream outlets. As with everything in the Trump era though, the debate is increasingly polarised and the opportunity for consensus politics diminished, despite a consistent large approval for gun control measures.
    I'm with you. What appalled me most on my last visit to the US was an amusement attraction called "Machine Gun America". The fact that anyone could find firing live ammunition for entertainment was extremely daunting.

    Ironically, my cousin in N. Carolina said she was frightened of going to London. The next day the guy opened fire in Vegas.

    I much prefer living in a country where people don't have guns.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
hibs.net ©2012 All Rights Reserved