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  1. #1
    @hibs.net private member Hibbyradge's Avatar
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    Yum

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-42639877

    I've seen stalls selling various insects in Thailand, and although I'm usually an adventurous eater, I haven't yet built up enough courage to sample any. I'ma bit disappointed in myself for that, tbh.

    I'm sure there are many intrepid dotnet entomophagists out there who might be willing to share their experiences.
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  3. #2
    @hibs.net private member overdrive's Avatar
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    When we were in Vietnam we went on a tour to the Cu Chi tunnels from the Vietnam War. However, the tour included a visit to a nearby cricket farm on the way back. We had the opportunity to sample crickets both on their own and as a filling in a spring roll. Both were delicious. Most people at least tried it though most only ate a couple. It was only me and an Aussie guy who devoured them. They were delicious, and deep fried were not too dissimilar to popcorn really.

    We then went on a moped food tour in Ho Chi Minh and sampled some interesting animal based products, e.g. other insects, frogs, etc. The most disturbing thing to Western tastes, however, was the local speciality of duck egg. Not that strange you might think as we consume them here. These duck eggs had been fertilised and duck ‘fetus’ allowed to begin to grow inside. Only two of us were brave enough to try it, me and interestingly another Aussie. Hands down it is the most disgusting thing I’ve ever consumed. It tasted vile and looked vile. You could clearly see the form of a baby duck. The remaining ‘yolk’ was veiny and apparently in some you even get the odd feather. I tapped out after eating barely half of it. The Aussie guy finished his but we were both boaking afterwards. The guides were devouring it.

  4. #3
    Coaching Staff HUTCHYHIBBY's Avatar
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    I've saw those duck eggs being consumed on Bizarre Foods on The Travel Channel, no thanks!

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by HUTCHYHIBBY View Post
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    I've saw those duck eggs being consumed on Bizarre Foods on The Travel Channel, no thanks!
    They sound horrific.

  6. #5
    Coaching Staff HUTCHYHIBBY's Avatar
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    Certainly don't look appetising! Andrew Zimmern on the show seemed to like it though.

  7. #6
    @hibs.net private member steakbake's Avatar
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    I've eaten grubs in Africa. First time, a family I was staying with had them as part of a meal - sort of with spinach and a spicy sauce. A bit like battered prawns, where the bit you hold is the bit you don't eat.

    Then one day, I bought them in a supermarket in Zimbabwe at their hot counter. They grew on me the more I had them. A whole box was a bit much, but they're salty, kind of nutty in a sense, chewy and slightly crunchy in places and they went down well with beer.

    I'd give them a go here if there was a restaurant that did them.

    I've seen them for sale in Asia, but didn't fancy them for some reason - smaller bugs and probably more wings and antenna than actual meat.
    Last edited by steakbake; 16-01-2018 at 06:32 PM.

  8. #7
    I’d be willing to give it a go. Previously tried a couple of breads made from insect ‘flour’. Whilst they were different from my usual bread they were pleasant enough and I’d eat again.

    It seems to me that if we can get past what they are there’s actually a solution to hunger and malnutrition staring us in the face along with a way to cut down on the environmental impact traditional farming has.
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    Coaching Staff hibsbollah's Avatar
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    Rural South Korea. Was drinking in a pub with some friends, after a few rounds they bring over some bowls of nuts and some other beer snacks. Tried these random black things without really inspecting them. Grasshoppers in soy sauce. Salty.

  10. #9
    There was one programme where the guy picked his teeth with the beak once he had finished. Black slimy stuff round an almost formed chick? Boiled and served at the roadside! Yum indeed

    Saw our guide digging for beetles when we were jungle trekking beside Chang Mai. Thankfully wasn't our dinner, but it was intended as a gift for the hosts to eat!

    They have vendors cycling about on wee bikes with stoves and fryers, stopping outside bars and selling bags to the punters. Sadly wasn't brave enough!

  11. #10
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by overdrive View Post
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    When we were in Vietnam we went on a tour to the Cu Chi tunnels from the Vietnam War. However, the tour included a visit to a nearby cricket farm on the way back. We had the opportunity to sample crickets both on their own and as a filling in a spring roll. Both were delicious. Most people at least tried it though most only ate a couple. It was only me and an Aussie guy who devoured them. They were delicious, and deep fried were not too dissimilar to popcorn really.

    We then went on a moped food tour in Ho Chi Minh and sampled some interesting animal based products, e.g. other insects, frogs, etc. The most disturbing thing to Western tastes, however, was the local speciality of duck egg. Not that strange you might think as we consume them here. These duck eggs had been fertilised and duck ‘fetus’ allowed to begin to grow inside. Only two of us were brave enough to try it, me and interestingly another Aussie. Hands down it is the most disgusting thing I’ve ever consumed. It tasted vile and looked vile. You could clearly see the form of a baby duck. The remaining ‘yolk’ was veiny and apparently in some you even get the odd feather. I tapped out after eating barely half of it. The Aussie guy finished his but we were both boaking afterwards. The guides were devouring it.
    There’s a Spanish dish of pregnant rabbit with the feotuses cooked inside it and then speard out on the plate next to mother!!!

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
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    There’s a Spanish dish of pregnant rabbit with the feotuses cooked inside it and then speard out on the plate next to mother!!!
    Laurices. Tried it the traditional way in Seville, it tasted nice but the knowledge of what it is does have an impact. Some places now serve newborn (under 10 day rabbits) instead.

    It dates back to the 15th century when it was permitted by the Pope to be eaten on Fridays and during Lent when other meat was forbidden.
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  13. #12
    Private Members Prediction League Winner Hibrandenburg's Avatar
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    A few Germans I know screw up their faces once I tell them what haggis is.

  14. #13
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    Laurices. Tried it the traditional way in Seville, it tasted nice but the knowledge of what it is does have an impact. Some places now serve newborn (under 10 day rabbits) instead.

    It dates back to the 15th century when it was permitted by the Pope to be eaten on Fridays and during Lent when other meat was forbidden.
    Francois Mitterrand’s favourite and last meal was a song bird (the Ortolan) eaten whole:-

    Once it has been fattened on millet, the captured ortolan is drowned in armagnac, plucked, and stripped of its feet and a few other tiny parts.

    After roasting in a ramekin for eight minutes, it is brought to the table while its pale yellow fat still sizzles, for the diner to take whole into his mouth.

    It comes painfully hot, says one who has sampled the forbidden flesh - "but the first taste was delicious, salty and savoury, swiftly followed by the delicate, incomparable flavour of the fat.

    "By now it had cooled sufficiently to allow me to get the whole thing into my mouth. It was awkward, but not the struggle I had imagined. I was aware of fine bones but resisted the urge to crunch them immediately.

    "Still sucking fat, I was aware of the richer, gamier flavour of its innards. I had been dreading this but the flavour remained delicate. Crunching the bones was like munching sardines or hazelnuts. I chewed a long time. When I finally had to swallow, I regretted the end of a very sensual experience."

  15. #14
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    I believe Scottish people eat a meal of lungs, hearts and liver wrapped in a stomach!! Savages!!

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Hibrandenburg View Post
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    A few Germans I know screw up their faces once I tell them what haggis is.
    If the ingredients get brought up when I am eating it, it puts me off. I obviously know full well what it is, but try not to think about it really. Same with black pudding tbf

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
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    Francois Mitterrand’s favourite and last meal was a song bird (the Ortolan) eaten whole:-

    Once it has been fattened on millet, the captured ortolan is drowned in armagnac, plucked, and stripped of its feet and a few other tiny parts.

    After roasting in a ramekin for eight minutes, it is brought to the table while its pale yellow fat still sizzles, for the diner to take whole into his mouth.

    It comes painfully hot, says one who has sampled the forbidden flesh - "but the first taste was delicious, salty and savoury, swiftly followed by the delicate, incomparable flavour of the fat.

    "By now it had cooled sufficiently to allow me to get the whole thing into my mouth. It was awkward, but not the struggle I had imagined. I was aware of fine bones but resisted the urge to crunch them immediately.

    "Still sucking fat, I was aware of the richer, gamier flavour of its innards. I had been dreading this but the flavour remained delicate. Crunching the bones was like munching sardines or hazelnuts. I chewed a long time. When I finally had to swallow, I regretted the end of a very sensual experience."
    I think Ortolans may be illegal now. It used to be tradition to cover the head when eating them to hide your identity.
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    If you think about it though, prawns and other seafood are pretty rank - prawn is basically a big sea-insect to look at.

    I think its just getting over the initial mental barrier.

    I never have (deliberately) eaten an insect, but i totally would try it, and it seems like a very obvious potential solution to a food problem.

  19. #18
    @hibs.net private member overdrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    There was one programme where the guy picked his teeth with the beak once he had finished. Black slimy stuff round an almost formed chick? Boiled and served at the roadside! Yum indeed

    Saw our guide digging for beetles when we were jungle trekking beside Chang Mai. Thankfully wasn't our dinner, but it was intended as a gift for the hosts to eat!

    They have vendors cycling about on wee bikes with stoves and fryers, stopping outside bars and selling bags to the punters. Sadly wasn't brave enough!
    That’s the one. The black slimy stuff is where the worst of the flavour came from if my memory serves me right.

  20. #19
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
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    The talk of potential solutions to food problems - are there starving people anywhere turning their noses up at eating insects?

    If you're starving, you're starving and I think most members of the human race would be surprised at the lengths they would go to if they were genuinely starving.

    Does the Ebola virus not come from starving people eating infected bats?

  21. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartie View Post
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    The talk of potential solutions to food problems - are there starving people anywhere turning their noses up at eating insects?

    If you're starving, you're starving and I think most members of the human race would be surprised at the lengths they would go to if they were genuinely starving.

    Does the Ebola virus not come from starving people eating infected bats?
    Bush meat in West Africa is a pretty grey area. There's certainly evidence it is linked to hunger and protein being scarce bit it's also a cultural issue and traditional in a lot of communities.

    Eating bats is quite common, and generally safe, across lasrge parts of Asia and the Pacific islands.
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  22. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smartie View Post
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    The talk of potential solutions to food problems - are there starving people anywhere turning their noses up at eating insects?

    If you're starving, you're starving and I think most members of the human race would be surprised at the lengths they would go to if they were genuinely starving.

    Does the Ebola virus not come from starving people eating infected bats?
    Sorry i probably worded that wrong - i meant more the environmental problem of growing enough protein for oir ever growing population, rather than hunger as such.

    Did HIV/AIDS not pass into humans via eating (or ****ging..😚) infected monkeys, or is that an urban myth?

  23. #22
    Testimonial Due Just Jimmy's Avatar
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    that was on the news the other night. cricket bread and fake burgers.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

  24. #23
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    I worked on a project before moving to my new job that assessed the role of insect protein as a way of providing food security to regions where water and energy weren't readily available to produce 'normal' foods. There's plenty of food stuff I wouldn't go near (bull's testicles, sheep eyes etc) but insect protein as a concept is pretty good. We had a UK producer as part of our work and they mostly used the 'flour' approach, which is pulverised insects being used as a protein ingredient to pastas etc.

    A lot of folk will always turn their nose up at the thought of it, but then there are people that turn their noses up at fish, vegetables, fruit...

  25. #24
    @hibs.net private member wpj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    I think Ortolans may be illegal now. It used to be tradition to cover the head when eating them to hide your identity.
    Better to cover your own head I would think? 😎

  26. #25
    Coaching Staff -Jonesy-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    I think Ortolans may be illegal now. It used to be tradition to cover the head when eating them to hide your identity.
    It is indeed, it's also worth noting that tradition dictates the birds are captured and during fattening have their eyes pricked out so they think its night time and feed constantly.

    Food writer Anthony Bourdain ate one at an illicit dinner party in the US and wrote "With every bite, as the thin bones and layers of fat, meat, skin, and organs compact in on themselves, there are sublime dribbles of varied and wondrous ancient flavors: figs, Armagnac, dark flesh slightly infused with the salty taste of my own blood as my mouth is pricked by the sharp bones. As I swallow, I draw in the head and beak, which, until now, have been hanging from my lips, and blithely crush the skull."

    I'm a chef and a fairly adventurous one but I think along with the foetal duck egg, Sardinian "death cheese" (a wheel of pecorino full of living maggots) I would give the whole ortolan a miss.

  27. #26
    First Team Regular The Pointer's Avatar
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    When I saw the title of the thread I thought it was 'Yours is yum' the title of a rather unfortunate e-mail that did the rounds a number of years ago, involving a young lady who clicked forward rather than reply.

    Not for a family show such as this, but you may get my drift.

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