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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    I happen to agree with the OP, and don't find his remark to be racist. On the morning commute through Morningside, you could be forgiven for thinking you were in south-east England some mornings.
    And that is a problem because....?


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  3. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by SouthsideHarp_Bhoy View Post
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    And that is a problem because....?
    The reason many are her is due to affordability issues in the south-east. They are part of a similar problem in Edinburgh now. I have lived that part of the world most of my days, and I wonder if locals are being priced out in a similar way to Londeners. If that is the case then that is a problem imo.

  4. #63
    Coaching Staff Betty Boop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Jonesy- View Post
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    Every time I leave the house on a Saturday or Sunday morning it's like waking into an open sewer, kebabs and vomit everywhere.
    Most times I come home on a Friday or Saturday night there's always some **** taking a slash against someone's door and groups of "lads" strolling about screaming at the top of their lungs, wtf is that all about?
    Couldn't agree more.

  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lendo View Post
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    exactly that.

    Airbnb listings in Scotland increased by 184% from January 2016 to January 2017.

    There are New Town flats which have 5 beds in each of the 5 bedrooms. Imaging being a resident in that stairwell and having stag do's of 25 people turning up each weekend.
    That's a good point. It's totally unfair to have residential buildings operating like hotels in holiday resorts. I take it there is no regulation? A free for all.
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  6. #65
    First Team Breakthrough Lendo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibernia&Alba View Post
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    That's a good point. It's totally unfair to have residential buildings operating like hotels in holiday resorts. I take it there is no regulation? A free for all.
    As far as I am aware it is completely unregulated. You don’t need to apply to the council for a HMO license, as you would for longer term letting. I might be wrong though.
    Last edited by Lendo; 20-12-2017 at 12:44 PM.

  7. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibernia&Alba View Post
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    Air B&B. Is this where somebody buys a property to let out for short term stays to tourists? I didn't know it's such a big thing.
    Have to say this is news to me as well.

    Maybe they should be regulated like HMOs.

    Perhaps I won’t retire to Edinburgh after all.

  8. #67
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
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    Here's a wee pot boiler.....
    What about the Edinburgh folk (who, from a Fifer's perspective are 'southerners') who buy houses in places like Ainster forcing the house prices up beyond the means of the locals there?

    Personally, I don't like what's being done to the city especially the redevelopments in St Andrew's Sq. - it's an architectural holocaust. Also knocking down St James Centre to build something which ( from the plans)l looks equally as offensive.
    Last edited by snooky; 20-12-2017 at 01:15 PM.

  9. #68
    Coaching Staff -Jonesy-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lendo View Post
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    As far as I am aware it is completely unregulated. You don’t need to apply to the council for a HMO license, as you would for longer term letting. I might be wrong though.
    You're not wrong

  10. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
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    Here's a wee pot boiler.....
    What about the Edinburgh folk (who, from a Fifer's perspective are 'southerners') who buy houses in places like Ainster forcing the house prices up beyond the means of the locals there?

    Personally, I don't like what's being done to the city especially the redevelopments in St Andrew's Sq. - it's an architectural holocaust. Also knocking down St James Centre to build something which ( from the plans)l looks equally as offensive.
    Nothing can be as offensive as the St James centre! And at least it is that carbuncle that is being knocked down not part of Edinburghs heritage that was removed the first time around...

    It's a good point about Fife and the people moving there. It's always happened to some degree but it does seem ever more popular now.

  11. #70
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
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    I live deep in Leith and work at the West End, so used to get the 22 to work (which went past the old St James Centre).

    As they were knocking down the old centre, there were pictures of the dog turd they are constructing on the barriers fencing off the building site.

    It used to make my blood boil every morning just looking at it.

    I was worried I was turning into Prince Charles for a bit.


    On a serious note, I'm having to give some pretty serious consideration to my future and where it lies. I own my own business, and it is tough - the rent, loan repayments (to have secured the location we have) and wage bill are crippling - it is very hard to pay wages that will allow people to live in Edinburgh. Customers/ clients don't have the cash they used to, so it is hard to make ends meet. I have an interest-only mortgage, 2% above base, so the good news is that I get to live in my 2 bedroom flat for a mortgage payment of £380 pm.

    Sadly I don't see any way that I will ever really be able to afford another home on the profit my business will ever generate, so I'm going to have to have a re-think - we have a baby on the way in February and will probably not want to live for more than 3 years or so in our 2 bedroom flat.

    It does grate a bit that I knocked my pan in at school, went to Uni for 7 years, did postgraduate qualifications, bought my own business yet stand little to no chance of owning a home anywhere near the city of my birth, or indeed being able to afford rent to live there.


    I liked Edinburgh a lot more before I lived here (born here, stayed until I was 3, lived at various other towns in the east of Scotland until 13 years ago when I moved back) and it hasn't really been a move that has worked out for me. My brother moved away a few years ago but gets all dewy-eyed when he comes back. I think it's always different visiting places to when you actually live there.

  12. #71
    @hibs.net private member Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
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    Here's a wee pot boiler.....
    What about the Edinburgh folk (who, from a Fifer's perspective are 'southerners') who buy houses in places like Ainster forcing the house prices up beyond the means of the locals there?
    It depends on what the house purchase is for. If it’s a Southerner, or anyone really buying that place as a second home or an investment then I certainly don’t agree with it.

    I’m actually one of those who fled Edinburgh and bought in Fife but it’s my only house and it’s for me and my family to establish ourselves here. I know for a fact that some Fifers have a dim view of the area I live in because so many people from Edinburgh have come over with their equity, increased demand and pushed up prices. We’re all in the same boat though, as we’ve been forced out of Edinburgh due to family homes becoming so unaffordable but the depressing thing is that even Fife is becoming unaffordable for so many.

    People keep asking what can be done but it’s bloody obvious...mass council house building and getting away from the notion that a house is nothing more than something that earns you money.There might be short term pain for some but we’re one of the richest countries in the world and we shouldn’t have people living on the streets or in temporary accommodation.

  13. #72
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    There are homes in Edinburgh right now that are well within the reach of most people earning around the average wage in the city.

    These homes may not be in areas of the city that are more desirable but they do exist (Pilton , Southhouse ,Niddrie ect). I think everyone would love a house in Trinity or Cramond ect but to your "average" worker that is unattainable however other homes outwith the nicer parts do exist.
    Last edited by Since90+2; 20-12-2017 at 03:17 PM.

  14. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Since90+2 View Post
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    There are homes in Edinburgh right now that are well within the reach of most people earning around the average wage in the city.

    These homes may not be in areas of the city that are more desirable but they do exist (Pilton , Southhouse ,Niddrie ect). I think everyone would love a house in Trinity or Cramond ect but to your "average" worker that is unattainable however other homes outwith the nicer parts do exist.
    I suppose it depends how you define within reach. An asking price of £110-£150K is at first glance affordable.

    The issue for many 1st time buyers is getting a deposit. I chose to go to uni and live away from home so have paid rent since I was 18 years old (in Edinburgh and Aberdeen which are both notoriously expensive cities to rent in). That was a choice I made but my earnings were pretty much non existent until i graduated. I went straight into full time work but a degree is not a fast track to the big bucks for most people. I currently rent in an area that probably isn't described as 'desirable' (edge of Niddrie) and the rent and council tax on a decent enough 2 bedroom home takes up about 45% of my salary. Factor in running a car which is pretty much essential for me, putting food on the table, clothing and feeding a baby, putting a bit by for emergencies and still actually trying to do the things that make life worthwhile and there's not a lot of money left for saving for a deposit. It's also worth bearing in mind that the 'average wage' (about £27K) is far removed from the 'wage that the average person earns' (4 in 5 new jobs were in sectors averaging just over £16K a year in 2014).

    Rent is a huge burden for many and it's only going to get worse (average £650 for a 1 bedroom flat and £1130 for a 3 bedroom flat in Edinburgh). I'm not saying it can't be done and plenty manage but there is a reason home ownership figures are stagnating across the whole country and it's not because people don't want to own their own houses.
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  15. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by beensaidbefore View Post
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    The reason many are her is due to affordability issues in the south-east. They are part of a similar problem in Edinburgh now. I have lived that part of the world most of my days, and I wonder if locals are being priced out in a similar way to Londeners. If that is the case then that is a problem imo.
    Agree, the influx of southerners moving to Edinburgh is not just restricted to the likes of Morningside though . It's city wide these days.

  16. #75
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    Genuine question then...

    Do people here agree that uncontrolled immigration from the EU is also a problem and needs controlled, or is that a different issue?

  17. #76
    @hibs.net private member bingo70's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    I suppose it depends how you define within reach. An asking price of £110-£150K is at first glance affordable.

    The issue for many 1st time buyers is getting a deposit. I chose to go to uni and live away from home so have paid rent since I was 18 years old (in Edinburgh and Aberdeen which are both notoriously expensive cities to rent in). That was a choice I made but my earnings were pretty much non existent until i graduated. I went straight into full time work but a degree is not a fast track to the big bucks for most people. I currently rent in an area that probably isn't described as 'desirable' (edge of Niddrie) and the rent and council tax on a decent enough 2 bedroom home takes up about 45% of my salary. Factor in running a car which is pretty much essential for me, putting food on the table, clothing and feeding a baby, putting a bit by for emergencies and still actually trying to do the things that make life worthwhile and there's not a lot of money left for saving for a deposit. It's also worth bearing in mind that the 'average wage' (about £27K) is far removed from the 'wage that the average person earns' (4 in 5 new jobs were in sectors averaging just over £16K a year in 2014).

    Rent is a huge burden for many and it's only going to get worse (average £650 for a 1 bedroom flat and £1130 for a 3 bedroom flat in Edinburgh). I'm not saying it can't be done and plenty manage but there is a reason home ownership figures are stagnating across the whole country and it's not because people don't want to own their own houses.
    I know this isn't the point of this thread but i was in a very similar situation to yourself and the prospect of saving £20k (to include solicitors fees and other requirements when buying) on that lifestyle in the timescales you'd need to is simply impossible, by the time you'd saved that amount the amount required will probably be closer to £30k.

    If it wasn't for the governments shared equity scheme, LIFT, there's no way i would have been able to buy. They only require a 5% deposit and as it's shared equity it's 5% of a much smaller house.

    If you're ever looking to try and get on the property ladder i couldn't recommend it highly enough.

    Apologies for taking the thread of on a tangent but thought i'd mention that there is help for Edinburgers that are wanting to stay in the city.

    I agree with the general sentiment of the OP though.

  18. #77
    Coaching Staff -Jonesy-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthsideHarp_Bhoy View Post
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    Genuine question then...

    Do people here agree that uncontrolled immigration from the EU is also a problem and needs controlled, or is that a different issue?
    No, no and yes

  19. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by SouthsideHarp_Bhoy View Post
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    Genuine question then...

    Do people here agree that uncontrolled immigration from the EU is also a problem and needs controlled, or is that a different issue?
    I think that most likely played a large part for a number of brexit voters. I'm not really bothered where you come from, but if local people are being priced out and forced to relocate I see it as an issue.

    As has been mentioned above, there are probably loads of villages around Scotland where properties are owned by people from Edinburgh. Same issue imo.

  20. #79
    Must be tough to get on the ladder, we ended up moving out of Edinburgh 10 years ago but came back 2 years ago.

    We’ve been lucky to make some decent money on houses so we could work up the ladder I bought my 1st flat in 95 for 33k and sold it 5 years later for 91k whilst in East Lothian we chucked all extra money into the mortgage and also made good money on the house. Now we live in Murrayfield and love being back in the city always missed the buzz of the place and having everything on your doorstep it changed a lot in the few years we weren’t living here.

    It’s a great city to be in.

  21. #80
    Growing up in edinburgh in 70's-80's, in the depths of thatchers Britain with no hope of a decent job, with loads of closed places, I would much rather it the way it is now.

    There needs to be a program of house building for affordable rented homes, not just affordable properties being built as a token gesture every time a block of derelict land is sold of or brownfield land is sold. I read that the 'problem' of giving land to build affordable housing is the risk of devaluing the prices of peoples houses as demand is satisfied. I for one, as a modest property owner, have no problems with this - I consider myself lucky to have gotten on the property ladder and to want to pull the ladder up is not fair.

  22. #81
    @hibs.net private member Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthsideHarp_Bhoy View Post
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    Genuine question then...

    Do people here agree that uncontrolled immigration from the EU is also a problem and needs controlled, or is that a different issue?
    Uncontrolled immigration probably does contribute to rising house prices but people who look at controlling it are looking at things the wrong way round. It’s the unfair system that needs fixed and I it was, housing wouldn’t be a major issue.

  23. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by andybev1 View Post
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    Growing up in edinburgh in 70's-80's, in the depths of thatchers Britain with no hope of a decent job, with loads of closed places, I would much rather it the way it is now.

    There needs to be a program of house building for affordable rented homes, not just affordable properties being built as a token gesture every time a block of derelict land is sold of or brownfield land is sold. I read that the 'problem' of giving land to build affordable housing is the risk of devaluing the prices of peoples houses as demand is satisfied. I for one, as a modest property owner, have no problems with this - I consider myself lucky to have gotten on the property ladder and to want to pull the ladder up is not fair.
    I read recently that 70% of the cost of a new house is now accounted for by the cost of the land.

    Seems to me that the solution is relatively straight forward. End the crushing restriction on land available for housing and you end the ridiculous premium on land with planning permission for houses.

    Accept the fact that our successful cities need to grow and make the land available to do so. That of course means building on the green belts that currently throttle our Cities (Edinburgh being one). It would also have the benefit of relieving pressure on the ever dwindling green areas within the cities themselves.

    Oddly none of the political parties want to do that yet it is the quickest and simplest way of providing affordable homes. They would rather come up with daft polices on stamp duty, help to buy, more taxation etc etc rather than address the glaringly obvious.

    Public, private, housing association the method of building is beside the point if the land is either not available or only available at exorbitant prices.

    You are right though that the quid pro quo is that it may well drive down the value of existing stock, which would be far from popular with the vast majority of existing home owners.....

  24. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
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    I read recently that 70% of the cost of a new house is now accounted for by the cost of the land.

    That of course means building on the green belts that currently throttle our Cities (Edinburgh being one). It would also have the benefit of relieving pressure on the ever dwindling green areas within the cities themselves.

    You are right though that the quid pro quo is that it may well drive down the value of existing stock, which would be far from popular with the vast majority of existing home owners.....


    interesting choice of word, throttle.

    I don't disagree with greenfield being used if it was for mainly social housing, the kind sold off during the 80's onwards.
    Last edited by andybev1; 20-12-2017 at 06:14 PM.

  25. #84
    @hibs.net private member overdrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
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    Here's a wee pot boiler.....
    What about the Edinburgh folk (who, from a Fifer's perspective are 'southerners') who buy houses in places like Ainster forcing the house prices up beyond the means of the locals there?

    Personally, I don't like what's being done to the city especially the redevelopments in St Andrew's Sq. - it's an architectural holocaust. Also knocking down St James Centre to build something which ( from the plans)l looks equally as offensive.
    I’d wager that a good few older buildings that we now consider architectural masterpieces were considered a ‘carbuncle’ or ‘architectural holocaust’ when they were first built. A city needs diversity in its architecture and to keep developing a mix of architecture or it will lose the very thing that makes it interesting and functional.

    I think what they’ve done in St Andrew Square has improved it a lot (ignoring the underhand way Standard Life went about it) and I am very much looking forward to the new St James, particularly the Orange Peel. What is it that you find particularly offensive about it?

  26. #85
    Not sure how much bigger Edinburgh can really get only really viable green belt that could be used is out towards the airport/Gogar.

  27. #86
    I am not sure what is viable or not due to who owns it but the south beside liberton has loads of greenfield - guessing the farmers would have something to say about it though.

    They have also built loads around the wisp area with more land usable - no council housing schemes though.
    Last edited by andybev1; 20-12-2017 at 06:36 PM.

  28. #87
    Coaching Staff stu in nottingham's Avatar
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    I wouldn't say that Edinburgh has lost its soul, I think that will always be there. It feels a little different to the eighties though as a visitor. Maybe a typical annual event exemplifies that for me and that's of course Hogmanay. From the late 1970s I was coming back up each year at that time, gathering at the Tron with 30,000 other people and it felt magical, for all it's simplicity. The Street Party came along and at first it was great, if only for the better facilities etc. but it leaves me a little cold when compared to the old custom. It feels homoginised by comparison, although there is far more to do.

    On the other hand New Year's Day memories remind me that there appeared to be not more than two places open on the day in the city centre-ish - McDonalds and the Zoo! It was okay for me, I had family to go and visit but I used to observe visitors trooping around the city with nothing to do on a grey day with nowhere to go.

    I think these events highlight the way that things have changed for better and for worse too.

    Regarding house prices, it's always sad to see when people born and bred in a place can barely afford to live where they come from. I think this is very much a general issue though, albeit one that Edinburgh exemplifies due to its great attractions, business and industry. I know people here in England that can no longer live in the rural villages they were reared in due to them becoming 'fashionable' for people with money. The irony is that the tiny cramped cottages that were once inhabited by rural workers and village industry in the form of framework knitting machines who lived on a pittance, for example, now have a Mercedes and BMW in the drive. They're commutable, they have (depending on your point of view) a 'better' quality of life, are attractive and are now out of the reach of the people that come from them due to their appeal.

  29. #88
    @hibs.net private member overdrive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patch1875 View Post
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    Not sure how much bigger Edinburgh can really get only really viable green belt that could be used is out towards the airport/Gogar.
    I doubt there will be much green belt between Edinburgh and Penicuik soon.

  30. #89
    @hibs.net private member --------'s Avatar
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    House prices rising, locals not being able to afford them and having to move out of the city, other locals cashing in selling their properties at the inflated prices ....

    Sounds like the sort of thing that's been going on in the Highlands and Islands for years.

    Of course, there it's blamed on the 'white settlers' ....






    .... from the South.




    Izzat racist?

  31. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by Doddie View Post
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    House prices rising, locals not being able to afford them and having to move out of the city, other locals cashing in selling their properties at the inflated prices ....

    Sounds like the sort of thing that's been going on in the Highlands and Islands for years.

    Of course, there it's blamed on the 'white settlers' ....






    .... from the South.




    Izzat racist?
    I remember sitting in the Lochindaal Hotel on Islay a few years back and hearing the reaction from a couple of young locals when a visitor from Glasgow exclaimed that a house in the village was selling for ‘only £185 000’ . It wasn’t positive.......
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