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Thread: The Jazz Thread

  1. #1
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    The Jazz Thread

    For completeness and in respect to Mr Hendricks

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...r-dies-aged-96

    Love Miles and Coltrane. Of the newerr stuff Joannna Brackeen is good.


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    Coaching Staff hibsbollah's Avatar
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    I like Kind of Blue, by Miles Davis and Blue Train by John Coltrane. Sydney Bechet and Lester Young also. I don't know what's going on in instrumental jazz most of the time, and I have to be in the right mood. Ella or Nina singing is always accessible though, and Louis Armstrong of course.

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    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
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    For completeness and in respect to Mr Hendricks

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...r-dies-aged-96

    Love Miles and Coltrane. Of the newerr stuff Joannna Brackeen is good.
    I'm very fond of Bill Evans, who played with Miles Davis for a while, around the time of Kind of Blue before pursuing his career in his own right.

    Also Horace Silver. Silver played with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers who I also hold in high esteem. A number of big names started off with the Jazz Messengers.

    Coltrane is my favourite by a distance though, pound-for-pound my favourite album is probably In A Silent Way by Miles Davis.

    I've got a few more-contemporary jazz albums on the ECM label. Some of it is very good and very sophisticated, but some of it is painfully arty and pretentious oodling. A friend described a particular Norwegian artist, on ECM, as producing music that was '...pining for the fjords' and when you hear it you know exactly what he meant
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    @hibs.net private member Mr White's Avatar
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    Not much of a jazz fan but a couple of tracks I've always enjoyed since seeing him live a good few years ago are The 37th Chamber and In The Garden of Eden by Courtney Pine. Both on his Modern Day Jazz Stories album. What a sax player.

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    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr White View Post
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    Not much of a jazz fan but a couple of tracks I've always enjoyed since seeing him live a good few years ago are The 37th Chamber and In The Garden of Eden by Courtney Pine. Both on his Modern Day Jazz Stories album. What a sax player.


    Great clarinet player too.
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    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
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    I first became aware of Jon Hendricks through Georgie Fame recordings (notably the Sound Venture album).
    Great lyricist. He added his words to the great sax tunes, I believe.
    Jon was in a trio with Annie Ross (sister of comedian Jimmy Logan).

    Although I'm really big on jazz, I do love Hendrick's lyrics.

    Another great gone.
    Last edited by snooky; 29-11-2017 at 11:27 AM.

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    Coaching Staff lyonhibs's Avatar
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    Maybe someone can help me with this query that's been bugging me for a while.

    One of my abiding recurring childhood memories is of my old man listening to a jazz program on the radio (long before digital radio so must have been Radio 2 or 4 or something) presented by an American man, must have been an older guy, with the most incredibly deep, soft, gravelly voice and he always played splendidly old recordings from like the 30's and 40's which were probably of mixed audio quality but the little crackles and pops on the recording made them all more memorable.

    It played on the weekends, probably early/mid afternoon as linked to this memory is that we'd always listen to it after (I think it was after anyway) any one of my Dad's trips to McAlistar and Matheson music on Grindlay Street.

    Any ideas either a) what the program was and/or b) who the presenter was??

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    Coaching Staff Sylar's Avatar
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    It's a genre I'd like to get into a bit more.

    I always really like, what I call, 'Detective Jazz' - the type of slow, moody and instrumental jazz you might associate with the classic detective shows of yore. But I've never managed to find anyone that fits that bill, so would love some recommendations.

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    @hibs.net private member Dan Sarf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
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    I first became aware of Jon Hendricks through Georgie Fame recordings (notably the Sound Venture album).
    Great lyricist. He added his words to the great sax tunes, I believe.
    Jon was in a trio with Annie Ross (sister of comedian Jimmy Logan).

    Although I'm really big on jazz, I do love Hendrick's lyrics.

    Another great gone.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8LZ02r7yz8

    "Nice."

  11. #10
    @hibs.net private member Dan Sarf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyonhibs View Post
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    Maybe someone can help me with this query that's been bugging me for a while.

    One of my abiding recurring childhood memories is of my old man listening to a jazz program on the radio (long before digital radio so must have been Radio 2 or 4 or something) presented by an American man, must have been an older guy, with the most incredibly deep, soft, gravelly voice and he always played splendidly old recordings from like the 30's and 40's which were probably of mixed audio quality but the little crackles and pops on the recording made them all more memorable.

    It played on the weekends, probably early/mid afternoon as linked to this memory is that we'd always listen to it after (I think it was after anyway) any one of my Dad's trips to McAlistar and Matheson music on Grindlay Street.

    Any ideas either a) what the program was and/or b) who the presenter was??

    It could have been AFN - the American Forces Network. Played all the good stuff.

  12. #11
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lyonhibs View Post
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    Maybe someone can help me with this query that's been bugging me for a while.

    One of my abiding recurring childhood memories is of my old man listening to a jazz program on the radio (long before digital radio so must have been Radio 2 or 4 or something) presented by an American man, must have been an older guy, with the most incredibly deep, soft, gravelly voice and he always played splendidly old recordings from like the 30's and 40's which were probably of mixed audio quality but the little crackles and pops on the recording made them all more memorable.

    It played on the weekends, probably early/mid afternoon as linked to this memory is that we'd always listen to it after (I think it was after anyway) any one of my Dad's trips to McAlistar and Matheson music on Grindlay Street.

    Any ideas either a) what the program was and/or b) who the presenter was??
    From your description I would strongly suspect the man you're talking about was Willis Conover. He presented on the Voice of America radio station, which wasn't actually broadcast in the USA, just to foreign countries. As a consequence, he was practically unheard of at home but had celebrity status in the former Eastern Bloc countries.

    He broadcast for years so the programme titles may have changed but I'm sure one was called Jazz Hour.
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    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sylar View Post
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    It's a genre I'd like to get into a bit more.

    I always really like, what I call, 'Detective Jazz' - the type of slow, moody and instrumental jazz you might associate with the classic detective shows of yore. But I've never managed to find anyone that fits that bill, so would love some recommendations.
    I think your best bet would be actual soundtracks from the '40s and '50s of film noir - I am sure there are various collections to buy or download. I think that would fit what you're looking for better than any individual composer/musician.
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