hibs.net Messageboard

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 61 to 71 of 71
  1. #61
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10,079
    Quote Originally Posted by Prof. ****gy View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    It's topical to point out Shostakovich was a big football fan and wrote reports for the Soviet sports papers. He was quoted in an article in Time magazine in 1942 :-
    “The climax of joy is not when you’re through a new symphony, but when you are hoarse from shouting, with your hands stinging from clapping, your lips parched, and you sip your second glass of beer after you’ve fought for it with 90,000 other spectators to celebrate the victory of your favorite team.”

    His favourite was was then called Zenit Leningrad.

    I've become cautious of reading too much into the supposed political agenda of Shostakoch's music. The official interpretation of his tenth symphony is that is a epitaph following Stalin's death. It's not.
    For one thing, it was composed in 1951 when Stalin was very much alive (compare it with his 5th string quartet) and for another the music includes his musical initials - d, e flat, c and b - which always (that's ALWAYS!) indicates he's writing about personal matters.
    Good post. Peevemor started a thread that's slipped off the front page of this sub-forum, called 'Insights' - just those sorts of lnsights into various musicians' works. I referenced the DSCH motif there.

    I have Ian MacDonald's biography of him though I've yet to read it, it's on the list though. My understanding is that it tries to strike a balanced and nuanced account that reflects the complexity of living as an artist in those times but ultimately comes down on the side of him being a dissident who hid his satire of the authorities in the more bombastic elements of his works. The last movement of the fifty symphony springs to mind as an example but I kind of like the fact that no one can really be too sure.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars


  2. Log in to remove the advert

  3. #62
    @hibs.net private member Dalianwanda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Strandhill, Sligo
    Age
    47
    Posts
    2,221
    Blog Entries
    1
    Surpised no ones mention Philip Glass..'Opening' is such a gorgeous piece of music. Currently just playing his work on shuffle each morning without actually looking at what a lot of it is. Just allowing it to flow through me on my walks to work

  4. #63
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10,079
    Quote Originally Posted by Dalianwanda View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Surpised no ones mention Philip Glass..'Opening' is such a gorgeous piece of music. Currently just playing his work on shuffle each morning without actually looking at what a lot of it is. Just allowing it to flow through me on my walks to work
    I wondered when the thread turned to John Adams whether it would bring in the likes of Glass or Steve Reich.

    I used to listen to them a lot more in the past than I do now, maybe time to revisit them. I think my favourite Glass work was his music for ‘Candyman’.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

  5. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Caversham Green View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'd forgotten about that, and when I googled it it turned out to be a different aria from the one I was thinking of. It's from Mozarts 'The Marriage of Figaro - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzuM2XTnpSA

    Probably my favourite aria from my favourite opera is the very dark 'Va Tosca' from ....Tosca. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3lPxwct2sk
    The Te Deum at the end of act 1 in Tosca is incredibly powerful. I think I'm right in that there isn't another example of orchestra, choir and soloist all in unison and at full pelt too.

    I might be slightly biased in that I performed in it in my younger years..

  6. #65
    @hibs.net private member Prof. Shaggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    835
    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I love Wagner’s music but the stories are absolute rot. If you like Tolkein and Game of Thrones they might appeal. Tristan and Isolde is good as a tale, though.

    I went to see it last year at the ENO with the sets designed by Anish Kapoor and it was very good. Bit too radical for some who didn’t like the intepretive staging but if you can believe that the fair and beautiful Isolde and the young warrior Tristan are the size of hippos then you should be able to believe a triangular partition is a boat!
    Eh!! That's the daftest of the lot!

    The whole story hinges on Isolde's maid, or whatever, accidentally fetching the bottle of love potion out of her handbag instead of the deadly poison. Three and a half hours later the pair end up dead anyway.
    If the staff did as she was asked everyone would be saved a lot of bother and we'd all get out to the pub a bit quicker.

    On the Opera thing, my kids clubbed together and got me tickets for the Covent Garden last summer. (Big number birthday). La Traviata is always good - and probably the only Verdi opera I can get into.
    Thing is - the gents toilets at the Royal Opera House are f***ing huge. There are no urinals - only cubicles. No danger the patrons will enjoy the same splash back we know and love in the depths below the East Stand....

  7. #66
    Good to see this thread back on the front page.

    I was thinking about resurrecting it by posting some pieces that people might recognise but not know what they were called or who composed them. Since Sergey has mentioned the cello and Jacqueline Du Pre I'll start with the piece that she's best known for (and by far my favourite Elgar composition) - Elgar's Cello Concerto. It was written shortly after WW1 and to my mind it's so evocative of what the British mood must have been like at that time - deep melancholy mixed with deep pride and determination, while not being as maudlin as Nimrod or as blustery as the Pomp and Circumstance marches (Land of Hope and Glory etc.). To be fair to those two they do rather suffer from being overplayed like those mentioned in posts #5 and 6 and the rest of the Enigma Variations are something of a mixed bag.

    I vaguely remember the cello concerto being used as the theme to a TV series some years ago and it crops up in adverts and films from time to time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPhkZW_jwc0&t=132s

  8. #67
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10,079
    Quote Originally Posted by Caversham Green View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Good to see this thread back on the front page.

    I was thinking about resurrecting it by posting some pieces that people might recognise but not know what they were called or who composed them. Since Sergey has mentioned the cello and Jacqueline Du Pre I'll start with the piece that she's best known for (and by far my favourite Elgar composition) - Elgar's Cello Concerto. It was written shortly after WW1 and to my mind it's so evocative of what the British mood must have been like at that time - deep melancholy mixed with deep pride and determination, while not being as maudlin as Nimrod or as blustery as the Pomp and Circumstance marches (Land of Hope and Glory etc.). To be fair to those two they do rather suffer from being overplayed like those mentioned in posts #5 and 6 and the rest of the Enigma Variations are something of a mixed bag.

    I vaguely remember the cello concerto being used as the theme to a TV series some years ago and it crops up in adverts and films from time to time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPhkZW_jwc0&t=132s
    Good post.

    I'll throw in Mussorgsky's 'Pictures at an Exhibition'.

    Mussorgsky wrote it for piano and it's a classic of the pianist's repertoire but I've linked the orchestral version (only orchestrated by some French bloke called Maurice Ravel ).

    I first heard it as an orchestral piece as the theme tune for the Rik Mayall political comedy, "The New Statesman" some thirty years ago now.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

  9. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Mibbes Aye View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Good post.

    I'll throw in Mussorgsky's 'Pictures at an Exhibition'.

    Mussorgsky wrote it for piano and it's a classic of the pianist's repertoire but I've linked the orchestral version (only orchestrated by some French bloke called Maurice Ravel ).

    I first heard it as an orchestral piece as the theme tune for the Rik Mayall political comedy, "The New Statesman" some thirty years ago now.
    Emerson Lake and Palmer did a prog rock version back in the 70s too. They actually did a few classical remakes - Copeland's Hoedown and Fanfare for the Common Man and Greg Lake's sampling of Prokofiev mentioned earlier in the thread.

    Mussorgsky composed it as a tribute to an artist friend of his and I assume the individual sections relate to pictures by that artist (who I can't be bothered to Google). I wonder what 'The Hut on Hen's Legs' and the 'Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks' were like. IMO the orchestrated version is more 'accessible' (can't stand people using that word in that context) but the solo piano version is more intriguing - which I reckon is what Mussorgsky intended.

    Since I've mentioned Copeland I'll chuck in one of his pieces - Simple Gifts from Appalachian Spring. For some reason I've always really disliked Lord of the Dance which uses the same tune but I do rather like Copeland's version.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JI6RYZygevA

  10. #69
    @hibs.net private member Jim Herriot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cambridge
    Posts
    276
    I'd recommend

    Gustav Holst Planets Suite, interpreted on synths by Isao Tomita, with video added (by who?).
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ev-o...156E0E47CDAB6C

  11. #70
    Cross-reference to the film thread - this is the music the gang pretend to play in The Ladykillers - the minuet from Boccherini's String Quintet. Baroques not really my favourite style of music but this makes me smile.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSE15tLBdso

  12. #71
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    10,079
    Erik Satie's "Gnossiene No.1", here.

    About 45 seconds in you hear the recurring motif and I think people will recognise it from numerous films and TV programmes.

    The word 'Gnossiene' was invented by Satie and it is disputed as to what it actually means. Satie had an interest in Gnosticism and it may well have stemmed from that.

    Have to confess, I hadn't thought of this piece before for this thread, but I heard it for the first time in a few years in the car this morning on Radio 3 and it seemed to fit with the current theme of pieces that were familiar but maybe not identified by title or composer.
    There's only one thing better than a Hibs calendar and that's two Hibs calendars

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
hibs.net ©2012 All Rights Reserved