hibs.net Messageboard

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 36
  1. #1
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Down East
    Posts
    9,928
    Blog Entries
    1

    Powder Puff Rugby

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41386706

    What's next?
    Boxing with no punching?
    Horse racing with no jockeys?
    Formula 1 with a 20mph limit?
    High jump with a max of 3ft bar
    Cricket played with a tennis ball?
    Football wearing slippers?
    Horizontal abseiling?
    Darts with sucker tips?
    Scuba diving in paddling areas only?

    Why don't these 'experts' just STFU and let people live their own lives.

    Feel free to add your own safety-conscience sports.


  2. Log in to remove the advert

  3. #2
    Gentleman of Leisure Doddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    La Fuente de la Madre
    Age
    67
    Posts
    25,063
    Gamer IDs

    Gamertag: Eh? PSN ID: No comprendo, senor. Wii Code: What's a Wii?
    Actually, if the figures quoted are right, and rugby has 4 times the concussion rate of ice hockey and 8 times that of gridiron when played by children, they're very probably right.

    This isn't about adult players making the choice to play the sport in a particular way, but schools rugby and teachers telling kids they have to do it 'this' way whether they want to or not. If parents aren't happy with the way a sports club's run, they can pull their kid out of the club and voice their concerns to the governing body (or even the police). Much harder to do that with a school.

    And there are lots and lots of ways of combatting a 'sedentary lifestyle' habit and juvenile obesity without risking concussion, broken bones, and neck injuries. And it's not about statistics - it being 'only' 4 or 5 in 1,000 - if my kid's one of the 4 or 5 I want the law to give me a way of (a) finding out what happened, and (b) nailing the stupid sod who let it happen.
    Last edited by Doddie; 26-09-2017 at 12:06 PM.


    "Once one accepts that one has bear-hugged full-blown barking there is great comfort in the bright lights and noises of the wibble-wibble show ..."

  4. #3
    @hibs.net private member CapitalGreen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    3,122
    Quote Originally Posted by Doddie View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Actually, if the figures quoted are right, and rugby has 4 times the concussion rate of ice hockey and 8 times that of gridiron when played by children, they're very probably right.

    This isn't about adult players making the choice to play the sport in a particular way, but schools rugby and teachers telling kids they have to do it 'this' way whether they want to or not. If parents aren't happy with the way a sports club's run, they can pull their kid out of the club and voice their concerns to the governing body (or even the police). Much harder to do that with a school.

    And there are lots and lots of ways of combatting a 'sedentary lifestyle' habit and juvenile obesity without risking concussion, broken bones, and neck injuries. And it's not about statistics - it being 'only' 4 or 5 in 1,000 - if my kid's one of the 4 or 5 I want the law to give me a way of (a) finding out what happened, and (b) nailing the stupid sod who let it happen.
    Some very good points made, as you highlight the key point of this is not an outright ban on tackling but that "schools should not be able to enforce contact rugby". Surely parents (& children) should have the ability to withhold their child from a situation which puts them at an increased risk of concussion.

    Depressingly though I fear many will probably side with the "health and safety gone mad" response of the OP.

  5. #4
    Gentleman of Leisure Doddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    La Fuente de la Madre
    Age
    67
    Posts
    25,063
    Gamer IDs

    Gamertag: Eh? PSN ID: No comprendo, senor. Wii Code: What's a Wii?
    Quote Originally Posted by CapitalGreen View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Some very good points made, as you highlight the key point of this is not an outright ban on tackling but that "schools should not be able to enforce contact rugby". Surely parents (& children) should have the ability to withhold their child from a situation which puts them at an increased risk of concussion.

    Depressingly though I fear many will probably side with the "health and safety gone mad" response of the OP.

    I'm also a wee bit concerned about the OP's use of the term 'powder-puff' - in my youth (a long time ago, alas) that expression, used as an insult as he uses it, had very definite connotations.

    Most websites will tell you that it refers to ';effeminate' or 'weak' heterosexual males, but I've always understood it to be an anti-gay slur, in the same category as 'poof' or 'poofter' or 'shirt-lifter' or 'nancy'.

    Just saying.

    I would also say that sports coaches and PT teachers need to be well-controlled and regulated.

    There have been far too many cases of kids either injured by coaches/teachers demanding too much of them or ignoring basic safety issues, or abused at school or in clubs by paedophiles who gravitated into those professions because they gave them opportunities to indulge their proclivities.

    Lots of jokes about scoutmasters etc, but my PT teacher was a sadistic wee ******* who should never have been allowed near kids. And he wasn't the only one in that school ...


    "Once one accepts that one has bear-hugged full-blown barking there is great comfort in the bright lights and noises of the wibble-wibble show ..."

  6. #5
    @hibs.net private member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    7,916
    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41386706

    What's next?
    Boxing with no punching?
    Horse racing with no jockeys?
    Formula 1 with a 20mph limit?
    High jump with a max of 3ft bar
    Cricket played with a tennis ball?
    Football wearing slippers?
    Horizontal abseiling?
    Darts with sucker tips?
    Scuba diving in paddling areas only?

    Why don't these 'experts' just STFU and let people live their own lives.

    Feel free to add your own safety-conscience sports.
    A number of those sports do have junior rules though.

    Football is played small sided and often with ball over head height rules to help prevent injuries and promote skills

    Boxing has headguards and shorter rounds

    Horse racing...well in general horse riding for kids is controlled via types of horse and no or low jumps etc.

    Formula 1 is an elite version of a sport that uses karts and power limits for younger drivers

    Etc etc so the concept of evolving how rugby is taught or played for younger players to help prevent potentially life changing concussions is not totally ridiculous.

    Gymnastics is that one that gets me though...the physical requirements on young kids and the impact that has on their bodies that are still growing and forming seems huge. The anecdotal evidence I have seen is that it can have long and lasting impacts on kids and I'm surprised that it's not a sport that has attracted more of the type of interest that the OP refers to.

  7. #6
    Testimonial Due Future17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    "Galactidos!"
    Age
    33
    Posts
    4,957
    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-41386706

    What's next?
    Boxing with no punching?
    Horse racing with no jockeys?
    Formula 1 with a 20mph limit?
    High jump with a max of 3ft bar
    Cricket played with a tennis ball?
    Football wearing slippers?
    Horizontal abseiling?
    Darts with sucker tips?
    Scuba diving in paddling areas only?

    Why don't these 'experts' just STFU and let people live their own lives.

    Feel free to add your own safety-conscience sports.
    I'm guessing your post was, at least slightly, tongue-in-cheek; however, I've heard others complaining about this subject previously and I don't think they've bothered to think it through properly.

    I think it's something which needs proper consideration and discussion, for a whole variety of reasons, some complex and some perhaps more obvious. Doddie has started the ball rolling already (if you pardon the pun).

    Notwithstanding that consideration and to answer your rhetorical question, one reason these experts shouldn't STFU and let people live their own lives is that children shouldn't be subjected to the threat of serious physical harm (including brain injuries and their long-lasting effects) against their will.

  8. #7
    @hibs.net private member overdrive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Bellevue
    Age
    32
    Posts
    4,166
    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    A number of those sports do have junior rules though.

    Football is played small sided and often with ball over head height rules to help prevent injuries and promote skills

    Boxing has headguards and shorter rounds

    Horse racing...well in general horse riding for kids is controlled via types of horse and no or low jumps etc.

    Formula 1 is an elite version of a sport that uses karts and power limits for younger drivers

    Etc etc so the concept of evolving how rugby is taught or played for younger players to help prevent potentially life changing concussions is not totally ridiculous.

    Gymnastics is that one that gets me though...the physical requirements on young kids and the impact that has on their bodies that are still growing and forming seems huge. The anecdotal evidence I have seen is that it can have long and lasting impacts on kids and I'm surprised that it's not a sport that has attracted more of the type of interest that the OP refers to.
    I agree with your general principle but, interestingly, I think the head guard rule has been scrapped in boxing. I was at an event earlier in the year and they had a match between two young boys. One was wearing a headguard whilst the opponent wasn't. I can only assume it is optional for young competitors now. I think the current thinking is that headguards are probably more harmful than not wearing one.

  9. #8
    @hibs.net private member easty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Age
    33
    Posts
    7,971
    Gamer IDs

    PSN ID: hibee_easty
    Quote Originally Posted by Doddie View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm also a wee bit concerned about the OP's use of the term 'powder-puff' - in my youth (a long time ago, alas) that expression, used as an insult as he uses it, had very definite connotations.

    Most websites will tell you that it refers to ';effeminate' or 'weak' heterosexual males, but I've always understood it to be an anti-gay slur, in the same category as 'poof' or 'poofter' or 'shirt-lifter' or 'nancy'.

    Just saying.
    Doddie...come on...dinnae.

  10. #9
    When hibs went up to lift the Scottish cup, I was there!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Dunfermline
    Age
    33
    Posts
    11,993
    Gamer IDs

    Gamertag: Myjo5984 Wii Code: 3916 0145 9394 9493
    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    A number of those sports do have junior rules though.

    Football is played small sided and often with ball over head height rules to help prevent injuries and promote skills

    Boxing has headguards and shorter rounds

    Horse racing...well in general horse riding for kids is controlled via types of horse and no or low jumps etc.

    Formula 1 is an elite version of a sport that uses karts and power limits for younger drivers

    Etc etc so the concept of evolving how rugby is taught or played for younger players to help prevent potentially life changing concussions is not totally ridiculous.

    Gymnastics is that one that gets me though...the physical requirements on young kids and the impact that has on their bodies that are still growing and forming seems huge. The anecdotal evidence I have seen is that it can have long and lasting impacts on kids and I'm surprised that it's not a sport that has attracted more of the type of interest that the OP refers to.


    You wouldn't put 10 year olds on a full size football pitch and tell them to play 11-a-sides or in a F1 car or on a fully-grown racehorse and there is a very good reason for that. They aren't physically capable of doing these sports at that level and there is a genuine danger of them being significantly harmed by doing so.

    Dont see why Rugby should be any different, touch/flag rugby has all the benefits of learning the game, tactics, fitness & teamwork without the dangers that comes with full-contact tackling & rucking etc.




    #persevered

  11. #10
    Played flag football (American football) as a kid and it works great. I also played rugby for my school at the time and don't think it would work out as good though.

  12. #11
    First Team Breakthrough
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by Doddie View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm also a wee bit concerned about the OP's use of the term 'powder-puff' - in my youth (a long time ago, alas) that expression, used as an insult as he uses it, had very definite connotations.

    Most websites will tell you that it refers to ';effeminate' or 'weak' heterosexual males, but I've always understood it to be an anti-gay slur, in the same category as 'poof' or 'poofter' or 'shirt-lifter' or 'nancy'.

    Just saying.

    I would also say that sports coaches and PT teachers need to be well-controlled and regulated.

    There have been far too many cases of kids either injured by coaches/teachers demanding too much of them or ignoring basic safety issues, or abused at school or in clubs by paedophiles who gravitated into those professions because they gave them opportunities to indulge their proclivities.

    Lots of jokes about scoutmasters etc, but my PT teacher was a sadistic wee ******* who should never have been allowed near kids. And he wasn't the only one in that school ...
    Well said Doddie!

    I am constantly voicing my anger to the Manager of shops & supermarkets who continue to stock the clearly homophobic branded breakfast cereal 'Sugar-Puffs'. Many times I have told store managers to remove them from their shelves as everyone clearly knows what Sugar-Puff really means!

    Got to keep fighting the fight until no one can say anything!

  13. #12
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Down East
    Posts
    9,928
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Doddie View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I'm also a wee bit concerned about the OP's use of the term 'powder-puff' - in my youth (a long time ago, alas) that expression, used as an insult as he uses it, had very definite connotations.

    Most websites will tell you that it refers to ';effeminate' or 'weak' heterosexual males, but I've always understood it to be an anti-gay slur, in the same category as 'poof' or 'poofter' or 'shirt-lifter' or 'nancy'.

    Just saying.

    I would also say that sports coaches and PT teachers need to be well-controlled and regulated.

    There have been far too many cases of kids either injured by coaches/teachers demanding too much of them or ignoring basic safety issues, or abused at school or in clubs by paedophiles who gravitated into those professions because they gave them opportunities to indulge their proclivities.

    Lots of jokes about scoutmasters etc, but my PT teacher was a sadistic wee ******* who should never have been allowed near kids. And he wasn't the only one in that school ...
    Sorry, Doddie. Didn't mean there to any underlying misinterpretation. My original idea for the thread title was 'Cotton Wool Rugby'. In retrospect, I wish I had stuck with that.
    Last edited by snooky; 26-09-2017 at 04:36 PM.

  14. #13
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Down East
    Posts
    9,928
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    A number of those sports do have junior rules though.

    Football is played small sided and often with ball over head height rules to help prevent injuries and promote skills

    Boxing has headguards and shorter rounds

    Horse racing...well in general horse riding for kids is controlled via types of horse and no or low jumps etc.

    Formula 1 is an elite version of a sport that uses karts and power limits for younger drivers

    Etc etc so the concept of evolving how rugby is taught or played for younger players to help prevent potentially life changing concussions is not totally ridiculous.

    Gymnastics is that one that gets me though...the physical requirements on young kids and the impact that has on their bodies that are still growing and forming seems huge. The anecdotal evidence I have seen is that it can have long and lasting impacts on kids and I'm surprised that it's not a sport that has attracted more of the type of interest that the OP refers to.
    Good and valid points, RS . My examples were meant to be taken a little bit tongue-in-cheek however,
    I will hold my hand up to being a member of the "H&S Gone Mad" gang.

  15. #14
    @hibs.net private member easty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Age
    33
    Posts
    7,971
    Gamer IDs

    PSN ID: hibee_easty
    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Sorry, Doddie. Didn't mean there to any underlying misinterpretation. My original idea for the thread title was 'Cotton Wool Rugby'. In retrospect, I wish I had stuck with that.
    What you're doing now, is apologising for doing absolutely nothing wrong, which kind of gives some degree of validation to the nonsense point/objection Doddie made.

  16. #15
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Down East
    Posts
    9,928
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by easty View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    What you're doing now, is apologising for doing absolutely nothing wrong, which kind of gives some degree of validation to the nonsense point/objection Doddie made.
    Thanks for your support, easty.
    I didn't think I'd done anything wrong however, given that there seemed to be an element of ambiguity and/or misinterpretation by some poster(s), I thought I'd set the record straight.

  17. #16
    @hibs.net private member Hiber-nation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Musselburgh
    Age
    59
    Posts
    12,750
    Quote Originally Posted by easty View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    What you're doing now, is apologising for doing absolutely nothing wrong, which kind of gives some degree of validation to the nonsense point/objection Doddie made.


    I've never imagined the phrase "powder puff" to have any any of the connotations Doddie refers to. I think of it as when someone like Scott Allan tries to put in a tackle. Homphobic abuse....nope.

  18. #17
    Coaching Staff HUTCHYHIBBY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    EDINBURGH
    Age
    46
    Posts
    14,053
    Quote Originally Posted by easty View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Doddie...come on...dinnae.
    Quite right easty.

  19. #18
    @hibs.net private member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    7,916
    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Good and valid points, RS . My examples were meant to be taken a little bit tongue-in-cheek however,
    I will hold my hand up to being a member of the "H&S Gone Mad" gang.
    Ha ha well I'm normally in that camp as well so dunno what's went wrong on this one 🤣

  20. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by DH1875 View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Played flag football (American football) as a kid and it works great. I also played rugby for my school at the time and don't think it would work out as good though.
    when did you play flag fotball as it certainly was a contact sport when i played, its changed big time now though, i played from about 1995-1997ish

  21. #20
    Testimonial Due weecounty hibby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    The wee coonty of course
    Posts
    2,009
    I've played rugby for 35 years now and still do when Hibs are away from home. I've played three times in the last four weeks and only missed out to go to ER for Motherwell game. Tackling, rucking and scrummaging are skills that need to be taught early on. If not then when these kids start to play senior rugby then they will not have the technique or ability to carry out these skills and will be more prone to injury.
    I can honestly say that rugby is safer now than it has ever been. Laws have been changed at contact areas and scrummaging is now strictly controlled to ensure safer scrums. The concussion protocols are very strict and any coach or referee who ignores these is leaving themselves wide open to being sued if anything goes wrong. Coaches and officials need to undergo annual training to be signed off for coaching at all levels of the sport. I coach u16 and u14 rugby on Tuesday and Thursdays with matches on Sunday and the prime objective is safety in every session.
    Rugby is a tough sport and is what attracted me to it, everyone who plays is aware of that as well. There is an ongoing campaign by a few people who are trying very hard to stop rugby and if they succeed where will it stop. No boxing, horse racing/eventing, no heading in football(already being discussed!!), young gymnasts being stopped from high impact sessions etc etc. I have broken more bones than Evel Kneivel over the years but it never once put me off playing as it is just part of the game for me. I have also played with guys who have never been injured or missed games.
    Even in fee paying schools it is as far as I am aware not compulsory to play contact rugby and kids can opt out. There was a pretty high profile case of this at Merchiston a few years back

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by HomeTeam View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Well said Doddie!

    I am constantly voicing my anger to the Manager of shops & supermarkets who continue to stock the clearly homophobic branded breakfast cereal 'Sugar-Puffs'. Many times I have told store managers to remove them from their shelves as everyone clearly knows what Sugar-Puff really means!

    Got to keep fighting the fight until no one can say anything!
    Quote Originally Posted by snooky View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Sorry, Doddie. Didn't mean there to any underlying misinterpretation. My original idea for the thread title was 'Cotton Wool Rugby'. In retrospect, I wish I had stuck with that.

  23. #22
    Coaching Staff LancashireHibby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Leigh, Lancashire
    Age
    30
    Posts
    6,264
    I didn't think they did any tackling in rugby union anyway? 😉

    My son played rugby league for a couple of years at under 7's & 8's level (until computers turned his head) which is full contact but the technique for tackling no higger than the waist is drilled in to them to the extent that I could count on one hand how many high tackles occured in two years, never mind concussion incidents. This is admittedly helped that at a younger age players don't really run on to the ball which significantly reduces the power of the collision.

    The complications start to come when they see the prop players almost entirely tackling the chest and waist and naturally they want to emulate that and put in the back hits etc. Rules have been amended in that regard with shoulder charges being banned and the like, but it will take years to turn the trend.

    The issue in schools is that probably 50-75% of those playing rugby in the lesson either haven't ever been taught the basic techniques at a young enough age, or simply don't want to be there and as such aren't providing the appropriate opposite force to effectively 'take' the tackle. In my experience at high school school 15+ years ago we had a very split year group in as such as we had several players that went on to play pro/semi pro in the same lesson as kids who just didn't want to know. Thankfully our teachers split them in to separate groups, but that would certainly be where tag rugby would be a viable alternative.

  24. #23
    Coaching Staff One Day Soon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    In hope
    Age
    53
    Posts
    5,051
    Quote Originally Posted by weecounty hibby View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    I've played rugby for 35 years now and still do when Hibs are away from home. I've played three times in the last four weeks and only missed out to go to ER for Motherwell game. Tackling, rucking and scrummaging are skills that need to be taught early on. If not then when these kids start to play senior rugby then they will not have the technique or ability to carry out these skills and will be more prone to injury.
    I can honestly say that rugby is safer now than it has ever been. Laws have been changed at contact areas and scrummaging is now strictly controlled to ensure safer scrums. The concussion protocols are very strict and any coach or referee who ignores these is leaving themselves wide open to being sued if anything goes wrong. Coaches and officials need to undergo annual training to be signed off for coaching at all levels of the sport. I coach u16 and u14 rugby on Tuesday and Thursdays with matches on Sunday and the prime objective is safety in every session.
    Rugby is a tough sport and is what attracted me to it, everyone who plays is aware of that as well. There is an ongoing campaign by a few people who are trying very hard to stop rugby and if they succeed where will it stop. No boxing, horse racing/eventing, no heading in football(already being discussed!!), young gymnasts being stopped from high impact sessions etc etc. I have broken more bones than Evel Kneivel over the years but it never once put me off playing as it is just part of the game for me. I have also played with guys who have never been injured or missed games.
    Even in fee paying schools it is as far as I am aware not compulsory to play contact rugby and kids can opt out. There was a pretty high profile case of this at Merchiston a few years back

    This.

    Never been a fan of Pollock's work. Usually sensational and often wide of the mark in my view.

  25. #24
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Down East
    Posts
    9,928
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by One Day Soon View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    This.

    Never been a fan of Pollock's work. Usually sensational and often wide of the mark in my view.
    Are you suggesting we change the P to a B?

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by allant1981 View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    when did you play flag fotball as it certainly was a contact sport when i played, its changed big time now though, i played from about 1995-1997ish
    From about 1990 to 1995. Took more hits when we trained but we played flags when we played. Don't remember us being part of a league as such as we would play against the boys team of whoever the adult team were playing that day. Games only lasted about half an hour as we'd play before, after or even at half time sometimes. Was a great experience but thinking back it was probably a bit dodgy. We had boys of around 11 or 12 playing against some 16/17 year olds. Don't think its like that now but probably didn't have enough players back then to make up the different age groups.

  27. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by easty View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    What you're doing now, is apologising for doing absolutely nothing wrong, which kind of gives some degree of validation to the nonsense point/objection Doddie made.
    Exactly. Powder-puff has only ever meant soft/lacking conviction etc. Linking that to homosexuality for no reason is something I'd be more weary of.

  28. #27
    @hibs.net private member Keekaboo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Heading home...
    Posts
    17,917
    Quote Originally Posted by RyeSloan View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Ha ha well I'm normally in that camp as well so dunno what's went wrong on this one 🤣

    Please don't use that term, it has very obvious negative connotations!




  29. #28
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Down East
    Posts
    9,928
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Keekaboo View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Please don't use that term, it has very obvious negative connotations!

    Wasn't his in-tent methinks

  30. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by DH1875 View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    From about 1990 to 1995. Took more hits when we trained but we played flags when we played. Don't remember us being part of a league as such as we would play against the boys team of whoever the adult team were playing that day. Games only lasted about half an hour as we'd play before, after or even at half time sometimes. Was a great experience but thinking back it was probably a bit dodgy. We had boys of around 11 or 12 playing against some 16/17 year olds. Don't think its like that now but probably didn't have enough players back then to make up the different age groups.
    must have just changed as you stopped playing then as we played in a national league and then there was a scottish national team formed as well, still had the flags but there was definitely contact, granted not full blown tackles the same as the seniors but still contact

  31. #30
    @hibs.net private member McD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Livingston
    Age
    37
    Posts
    1,622
    Played rugby for years, in one of the positions and playing style most likely to come into tackle related injuries, and the worst I had to show for it was some cuts and bruises (and the odd stud mark). And I was a scrawny bean pole of a laddie to boot.

    i agree with the points made earlier, teaching proper technique at an early age significantly reduces the likelihood of injury, it also removes the fear of a contact situation so the child/youth will go into the situation with confidence and experience, whereas a youth tackling/about to be tackled who isnít sure of what to expect or how to do it properly will be more likely to get injured through half heartedly approaching the situation with trepidation.

    Teachers and coaches have a massive responsibility to do that teaching, and also to deal with any behaviour that could lead to injury.

    i understand the argument here, but Iíd say itís as likely a child could injure themselves on a bike, my nephew broke his arm a few weeks ago on his scooter, but I donít see anyone from a think tank/university saying we should ban bikes or scooters or walking on bumpy pavements, or any other activity that *could* lead to injury.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
hibs.net ©2012 All Rights Reserved