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View Poll Results: How Do/Did You react to Diana's Death?

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  • Devistated

    0 0%
  • Bit Upset

    5 9.26%
  • Non plussed

    27 50.00%
  • Repelled by the whole spectacle

    19 35.19%
  • Good riddance!!

    3 5.56%
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  1. #1
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Diana: In Memoriam

    20years on and the media are covering the anniversary of her death extensively.

    My experience of the events at the time was that the mood in the media wasn't reflected in the people. There was an interesting documentary at the time which vox popped the people turning up for the funeral who were mostly there to see an event rather than in grief.

    I'm a bit of a republican so maybe I'm seeing things through my own perspective but I felt a lot of what she did was an attempt at media image manipulation. So......... a poll!!!


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  3. #2
    @hibs.net private member lord bunberry's Avatar
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    I'm also a republican so I wasn't in the least bit caught up in the grief. It's never nice to hear of someone dying, but it didn't have any effect on me emotionally.

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  4. #3
    @hibs.net private member Speedy's Avatar
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    Too young to really understand the magnitude of the situation, but probably felt a bit upset at the time because I felt like I should be.

  5. #4
    Mostly nonplussed but I was somewhat hacked off that the Scotland game got moved as I was going to it and it was a hassle to get rearranged (I think it was at Pittodrie).

    I was also down in London during the week before the funeral and staying not far from Kensington Palace so I saw the vast mounds of dying flowers, discarded soft toys and truly awful poetry that was left there. That was utterly bizarre.

  6. #5
    Sad for her children to lose their mother and, regardless of my Republican views, I feel for them as young men who suffered such a traumatic loss.

    I was young at the time but looking back the whole public spectacle was utterly bizarre. Adults openly weeping and wailing in the street for a lady they didn't know beyond a media portrayal. It was totally OTT. I've unfortunately had to attend funerals of a couple of children and I've seen bereaved parents act with more composure.

    I think the media whipped up such a frenzy that some people felt almost compelled to behave in a certain way. It was, and to an extent still is, coordinated grief imo.
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  7. #6
    Testimonial Due Geo_1875's Avatar
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    Couldn't work out why (some) Scots were bothered by the death of the English ex-wife of the Prince of Wales with her Egyptian boyfriend in France. And the crocodile tears of the press was an outrage.

  8. #7
    I remember my gran waking me up to tell me the news. She seemed pretty upset at the time but all I can remember is thinking, WTF did you wake me up to tell me that for.

  9. #8
    Coaching Staff Hibbyradge's Avatar
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    I've no time for the monarchy, but I was quite shocked and saddened when I heard the news so I voted "a bit upset".

    It was a tragic waste of a life and I don't think there's ever been a higher profile young person to die in my lifetime. Amy Winehouse, maybe, but her death wasn't exactly a shock, was it.

    I think there was something about her which made people like her. Vulnerability, perhaps, or the suspicion (certain knowledge) that she'd been totally screwed over by her husband.

    No other "Royal" would galvanise the public's emotions the way that we saw when Diana died, although it was well OTT for me.
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  10. #9
    Coaching Staff heretoday's Avatar
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    The mass hysteria at the time was very odd and rather frightening.

    She should be left to rest in peace and her sons should keep their dignity instead of allowing the media to stage manage them.

  11. #10
    @hibs.net private member McD's Avatar
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    It was a watershed moment in how the media and public react to and interact with high profile deaths.

    it feels like there's a much bigger reaction to these situations since then than there was before.
    The press and media whip up a storm of grieving,
    the person in question is seen on many channels in many discussions,
    minutes silence/applause at many events,
    televised funeral,
    thousands lining the route of the hearse,
    the expectation of conforming to what the media deem to be the correct emotional response and the backlash on those who don't feel/act that way,
    the celebrity 'jumpers-on' who jostle to position themselves as the best person to talk about the deceased and explain their world view.

    And we've (society) become so good at it that it feels more and more rehearsed and familiar, a procession of steps that the public and media go through each and every time.

    I cant remember a high profile death that has engendered such a public response, since then it seems like society is determined to reach those extremes again and again.
    Last edited by McD; 31-08-2017 at 05:47 PM.

  12. #11
    Coaching Staff HUTCHYHIBBY's Avatar
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    I remember being in The Persevere the day of the funeral procession and some old boy telling us to shut up so that he could hear the commentary on the tele. He didnae get the response he was looking for. Not exactly normal pub tele viewing right enough! :-)

  13. #12

    Diana: In Memoriam

    I remember watching the TV in the week running up to the funeral (bizarrely I was in Paris on the day itself) and being amazed at the number of people who seemed upset by it.

    However, I very quickly realised that almost all of the people I saw upset (only on TV) were too young to have experienced the loss of someone close to them - a parent or a spouse.

    I can't help thinking that they will probably look back with a bit of embarrassment now as the chances are they now know what real loss feels like.

  14. #13
    @hibs.net private member oldbutdim's Avatar
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    I wondered if the hearse would have a "Princess On Board" sign on the back window.

  15. #14
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
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    I was saddened by what happened however the OTT mourning and the mediafest that followed was a bit showbiz and rather tasteless to me.
    It was somewhat ironic that she was known as Princess Di.

  16. #15
    Coaching Staff NAE NOOKIE's Avatar
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    First things first .... It is tragic on a human level for any kids to lose a parent at such a young age, been there done that got the T shirt, how can you not feel for any kid in that situation no matter who they are.

    Even though I'm a lifelong republican I admit that even I shed a tear as the hearse pulled away with folk in the crowd throwing flowers in front of it, but the truth is that was not real grief, it was the show of emotion you get from cinema audiences watching Bambi's mum getting killed or some such other tear jerking cinematic event, or in some cases the type of hair tearing abject show of misery you get from a teenage girl on hearing One Direction have split up.

    Since that time the almost canonisation of Diana has been quite something to behold ..... in the last couple of weeks I have heard her death described by TV reporters as 'catastrophic' and a 'national disaster' and even now 20 years later I see stuff on my Facebook page discussing her and how great a mother she was and 'how terrible Charles and that horse faced harlot were to her'

    The biggest joke is fervent royalists, almost to a person women in this case, raging about how Charles should step aside and allow William to be king when Lizzy dies ..... A) because he 'betrayed their idol ..... and B) because he simply isn't as young and good looking as Wills and not only that it will stop horse face ever being queen. 'Kate is nice, but I wish she would stop trying to be the next Diana' is one I liked ............ For them royalty is a popularity contest and their view on how it should work is a million miles removed from how the royals see it.

    The truth is sad though it was the death of Diana was no more an important social event than the passing of Elvis or Marilyn Monroe and IMO the weeks and weeks of endless interviews with her kids, friends and folk who changed her bed linen or served her in a shop one time added to the saturation media coverage leading up to its anniversary have been way over the top.

  17. #16
    Testimonial Due Just Jimmy's Avatar
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    Never met her. I was 11. I remember waking up to the news on the Sunday morning.

    Was then and still am completely non-plussed.

    Time to bin the royals and the whole concept that some is better because of what or who they are born into.

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  18. #17
    @hibs.net private member Steve-O's Avatar
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    I remember getting up, being told, being shocked, and then being annoyed that Super Sunday was cancelled as a result!

    And then after about a week of 'outpouring' on the news, I got a bit sick of it and cynical.

  19. #18
    @hibs.net private member easty's Avatar
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    I remember my mum waking up that morning and I said "guess who's died?".

    She said "Darren Jackson?"

    Pffft no even close.

    I don't remember actually seeing anyone upset about it. Nobody crying or talking about how much of a disaster it was. Only on tv.

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  20. #19
    Coaching Staff hibsbollah's Avatar
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    There was an hours worth of interviews on the radio yesterday in a 'do you remember how you felt when she died?' stylee. Almost everybody the BBC managed to find were deeply upset by the whole thing, including one woman who described how she cried and cried. 'How old were you?' said the interviewer. 'Two' said the woman.

    Which says it all really. When we're told to feel upset, most of us feel upset.

  21. #20
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
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    I'm a bit uncomfortable talking about it but I've always been horribly cynical about the whole affair.

    Young boys losing their mother and being thrust under the eyes of the world - you would have to be inhuman not to feel for the poor young things.

    But the outpouring of public grief? I didn't get it, I found it distasteful.

    And the most cynical part of me has always felt the members of the public who were most deeply affected were those who probably bought every tabloid and every magazine and scrutinised her every movement, every action and every event that happened during her relationships.

    They made her life hell, they drove the demand for paparazzi photographs, they ultimately killed her.

  22. #21
    @hibs.net private member PeeJay's Avatar
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    We were actually heading out of Munich that day for some mountain hiking, but this news effectively put the kibosh on that idea...

    I was shocked at the time, I recall being a bit tearful at seeing the emotional outpouring amongst the funeral procession. I was surprised at the openly shed tears, the massive amount of flowers and the generally overheightened sense of distraughtness. I'd been out of the county for some years at that moment and I didn't really recognise the UK I was seeing on the tv. Astonishingly, German tv coverage was full of Diana and many, many people were "upset" here too ... I understood that even less -

    I remember thinking at the time why did these people think it was ok to drive at high speed into a tunnel in an urban area while not wearing safety belts, just to escape some photographers?

    20 years down the road German tv is again covering this "event" in depth

    ... it was a sad waste of a life:


    .... Die spinnen, die Briten ....

  23. #22
    Coaching Staff HUTCHYHIBBY's Avatar
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    Not just one life.

  24. #23
    @hibs.net private member PeeJay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HUTCHYHIBBY View Post
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    Not just one life.
    Fair point but the OP was about Diane - that's what I was responding to ....
    .... Die spinnen, die Briten ....

  25. #24
    Too young to understand. But if it was now, I reckon I would be saddened to hear of a young mother (and seemingly a good egg) dying in such circumstances.

    The Royal connections are neither here nor there for me.

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartie View Post
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    I'm a bit uncomfortable talking about it but I've always been horribly cynical about the whole affair.

    Young boys losing their mother and being thrust under the eyes of the world - you would have to be inhuman not to feel for the poor young things.

    But the outpouring of public grief? I didn't get it, I found it distasteful.

    And the most cynical part of me has always felt the members of the public who were most deeply affected were those who probably bought every tabloid and every magazine and scrutinised her every movement, every action and every event that happened during her relationships.

    They made her life hell, they drove the demand for paparazzi photographs, they ultimately killed her.
    I thought their drunk driver killed them

  27. #26
    Gentleman of Leisure Doddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smartie View Post
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    I'm a bit uncomfortable talking about it but I've always been horribly cynical about the whole affair.

    Young boys losing their mother and being thrust under the eyes of the world - you would have to be inhuman not to feel for the poor young things.

    But the outpouring of public grief? I didn't get it, I found it distasteful.

    And the most cynical part of me has always felt the members of the public who were most deeply affected were those who probably bought every tabloid and every magazine and scrutinised her every movement, every action and every event that happened during her relationships.

    They made her life hell, they drove the demand for paparazzi photographs, they ultimately killed her.

    The lady was a very skilful manipulator of the media in her own right, IMO. I think she would have been utterly devastated if they had suddenly started ignoring her.

    Deep sympathy for the two boys caught in the spotlight? Obviously.

    But the public 'grief'? Distasteful in the extreme.

    We had the drunk driver, the paparazzi who pursued the car and carried on taking photos of the crash while the people in it were dying, the public emotion orchestrated and encouraged by media with money to make, the ghastly newspaper and TV reports that equated to instant canonisation by public acclaim? The mounds of flowers and wreaths and soft toys? It was so false and insincere. The media said "Grieve", so they grieved, publicly and distastefully and way OTT.

    I was glad when it was over and people shut up about it.


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  28. #27
    Coaching Staff Smartie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pollution View Post
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    I thought their drunk driver killed them
    Whilst being chased by aggressive paparazzi photographers wanting to get the lucrative shots of the Princess with her new man, the pictures that the hordes would have been happily gawping at had that car journey not ended in tragedy.

  29. #28
    @hibs.net private member Bishop Hibee's Avatar
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    The whole thing was completely OTT. Sad for the kids but the rest of it was a total circus. I worked in an office full of male engineers and not one of us could believe the faux grief and mass hysteria on the TV. I took my then 2 year old son to feed the ducks at Holyrood Park to get away from it all on the day itself. I passed Holyrood Palace and the number of people greetin' and placing flowers was unreal. I couldn't help wondering when the last time was they'd visited a relatives graveside to do the same.

    It'll be nothing compared to when Madge dies
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  30. #29
    Scottish Cup Victory - Witness 2016 Scouse Hibby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jimmy View Post
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    Never met her. I was 11. I remember waking up to the news on the Sunday morning.

    Was then and still am completely non-plussed.

    Time to bin the royals and the whole concept that some is better because of what or who they are born into.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    And how do propose that the royals are binned. Put them all in a coach and crash it in a French tunnel?
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    an advantage, then he should be."

  31. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Bishop Hibee View Post
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    The whole thing was completely OTT. Sad for the kids but the rest of it was a total circus. I worked in an office full of male engineers and not one of us could believe the faux grief and mass hysteria on the TV. I took my then 2 year old son to feed the ducks at Holyrood Park to get away from it all on the day itself. I passed Holyrood Palace and the number of people greetin' and placing flowers was unreal. I couldn't help wondering when the last time was they'd visited a relatives graveside to do the same.

    It'll be nothing compared to when Madge dies
    Madge?

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