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  1. #61
    Ireland's Greatest Import Mr White's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouse Hibee View Post
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    Is Highland Park not considered to be gentle. I thought it had a smokey taste,is that right?
    It's not the best one to try first imo. It's got a slight smokiness, and a definite taste of the sea. Dalwhinnie is worth a go I'd say. If you don't like a wee sip of that after its been mixed with a very small dash of water then whisky probably isn't for you. Again imo as everyone's different of course.


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  3. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouse Hibee View Post
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    Is Highland Park not considered to be gentle. I thought it had a smokey taste,is that right?
    It's not one I know. Sorry. here's what the bible says.

    http://www.scotchmaltwhisky.co.uk/highland-park.htm

  4. #63
    @hibs.net private member Mibbes Aye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouse Hibee View Post
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    Is Highland Park not considered to be gentle. I thought it had a smokey taste,is that right?
    Highland Park isn't a gentle introduction

    It's not as astringent as the full-on peaty malts but it's probably one you would progress to.

    As per Mr White's post, a good starting point is a Dalwhinnie, or a smooth Speyside like Aberlour, or one of the Central Belt ones like Auchentoshan or Glenkinchie. Very small sips and don't be afraid to try adding a few drops of water (literally no more) as it opens up the flavours.

    If you decide you like it then you can think about stepping it up with the coastal and Islay malts (or indeed go the other way, with some of the really rich Speysides for example)
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  5. #64
    @hibs.net private member TRC's Avatar
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    I'd add craggenmore to the starter list a great dram

  6. #65
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouse Hibee View Post
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    No it translates as not really knowing my whisky I tried one I thought might appeal.
    10 year old Aberlour is pretty quafable

  7. #66
    Tbh I've always found the idea that people need to start on a 'beginners' whisky a bit of a myth. I think people just like what they like.

    I followed the same path of trying some of the quite frankly bland Speysides thinking I would develop a taste. It was only when I tried the likes of Talisker and Ardbeg that I fell in love with whisky. The peatiness, smokiness and warmth appealed far more than anything I had tasted previously. From there I was able to begin to appreciate the various whiskies from Springbank (the distillery producing by far the best whisky in Scotland at the moment), the likes of Old Pultney, Highland Park and other whiskies with brine and smoke pouring from them. I also began to appreciate the richer Speysides as opposed to the 'easy' ones I'd been pushed towards.

    For someone trying to get into whisky I'd suggest buying a few miniatures from each of the regions and trying 2 or 3 at a time until you start to work out what you like. From a collection of say:

    Islands - Talisker and Highland Park
    Speyside - Glenfarclas and Cragganmore
    Highlands - Dalwhinnie and Clynelish
    Islay - Lagavulin and Ardbeg
    Campbletown - Springbank and Longrow (same distillery, very different whisky)
    Lowland - Glenkinchie and Bladnoch

    Most people will start to find out what they like. It takes time but the 'effort' is generally enjoyable.

    There used to be 3 or 4 of us from here met up and tried a few whiskies, if anyone fancied it again I'd be keen.

  8. #67
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    Tbh I've always found the idea that people need to start on a 'beginners' whisky a bit of a myth. I think people just like what they like.

    I followed the same path of trying some of the quite frankly bland Speysides thinking I would develop a taste. It was only when I tried the likes of Talisker and Ardbeg that I fell in love with whisky. The peatiness, smokiness and warmth appealed far more than anything I had tasted previously. From there I was able to begin to appreciate the various whiskies from Springbank (the distillery producing by far the best whisky in Scotland at the moment), the likes of Old Pultney, Highland Park and other whiskies with brine and smoke pouring from them. I also began to appreciate the richer Speysides as opposed to the 'easy' ones I'd been pushed towards.

    For someone trying to get into whisky I'd suggest buying a few miniatures from each of the regions and trying 2 or 3 at a time until you start to work out what you like. From a collection of say:

    Islands - Talisker and Highland Park
    Speyside - Glenfarclas and Cragganmore
    Highlands - Dalwhinnie and Clynelish
    Islay - Lagavulin and Ardbeg
    Campbletown - Springbank and Longrow (same distillery, very different whisky)
    Lowland - Glenkinchie and Bladnoch

    Most people will start to find out what they like. It takes time but the 'effort' is generally enjoyable.

    There used to be 3 or 4 of us from here met up and tried a few whiskies, if anyone fancied it again I'd be keen.

    Good list of whiskies. I would not disagree with any. I also like Speyburn and Allt a Bhaine in the Speyside categories.

    Old Pultney's nice in the coastal whiskies

    I've taken your advice and ordered a 25year old Bladnoch!!
    Last edited by Colr; 04-10-2016 at 08:37 AM.


  9. #69
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07z8644

    This starts next Tuesday for anyone interested. David Hayman is pretty good at these sort of shows, his tribute to Weirs Way last year was really enjoyable.
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  10. #70
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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  11. #71
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Just tried a scotch and green tea as is popular in China. It's actually pretty good!!

    Also, coconut water (how they drink it in Brazil).

    Japanese whisky is really good as a highball with ice cold soda.
    Last edited by Colr; 11-11-2016 at 11:46 AM.

  12. #72
    @hibs.net private member Bishop Hibee's Avatar
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    I wouldn't mix a malt whisky with anything other than water but have no problem mixing a blend with anything. Whisky and coke was big in Spain when I was at a wedding there a few years ago and whisky was pretty much always mixed with lemonade at family parties in the 70's and 80's.

    On topic, has anybody been in to the Queen St Malt Whisky Society premises since it was done up?
    "Washing one's hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.' - Paulo Freire

  13. #73
    @hibs.net private member Golden Fleece's Avatar
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    Had a pleasant evening with my brother at the Vaults on Thursday. I chose two whiskies from the list and my brother had a list of the distilleries. The first was a Glenlivet 9 year old 64.9% and the second a Tullibardine 16 year old 56.5% and I think I want a bottle of the Tullibardine.
    #Persevered
    Scotland can be a beacon, within these islands and beyond, for a socially just and sustainable society. Whilst there are many priorities which will require independence, there is also much that can and must be done now by the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Government.

  14. #74
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golden Fleece View Post
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    Had a pleasant evening with my brother at the Vaults on Thursday. I chose two whiskies from the list and my brother had a list of the distilleries. The first was a Glenlivet 9 year old 64.9% and the second a Tullibardine 16 year old 56.5% and I think I want a bottle of the Tullibardine.
    Is that the one which was matured in the Sauterne cask?

  15. #75
    @hibs.net private member Golden Fleece's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
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    Is that the one which was matured in the Sauterne cask?
    Not sure. But it was sublime. Nectar is the best way to describe it.
    #Persevered
    Scotland can be a beacon, within these islands and beyond, for a socially just and sustainable society. Whilst there are many priorities which will require independence, there is also much that can and must be done now by the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Government.

  16. #76
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golden Fleece View Post
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    Not sure. But it was sublime. Nectar is the best way to describe it.
    I've got a bottle of Tullibardine 28.3 "Pure Indulgence"

    It's very nice indeed.

  17. #77
    @hibs.net private member Golden Fleece's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
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    I've got a bottle of Tullibardine 28.3 "Pure Indulgence"

    It's very nice indeed.
    Seriously think I will get the bus to Blackford to get a tasting.
    #Persevered
    Scotland can be a beacon, within these islands and beyond, for a socially just and sustainable society. Whilst there are many priorities which will require independence, there is also much that can and must be done now by the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Government.

  18. #78
    Testimonial Due Colr's Avatar
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    I recommend American Rye whiskey with pepsi or even Dr Pepper. Knocks JD into a cocked Stetson.

  19. #79
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colr View Post
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    10 year old Aberlour is pretty quafable
    It's Aberlovely

  20. #80
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouse Hibee View Post
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    Is Highland Park not considered to be gentle. I thought it had a smokey taste,is that right?
    My late father's favourite tipple (mind you, he had 50% Orkney blood in him).
    Alas, too smokey for me. I'm a Speyside man. Each to his own, though.
    Slainte!

  21. #81
    @hibs.net private member danhibees1875's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    Tbh I've always found the idea that people need to start on a 'beginners' whisky a bit of a myth. I think people just like what they like.

    I followed the same path of trying some of the quite frankly bland Speysides thinking I would develop a taste. It was only when I tried the likes of Talisker and Ardbeg that I fell in love with whisky. The peatiness, smokiness and warmth appealed far more than anything I had tasted previously. From there I was able to begin to appreciate the various whiskies from Springbank (the distillery producing by far the best whisky in Scotland at the moment), the likes of Old Pultney, Highland Park and other whiskies with brine and smoke pouring from them. I also began to appreciate the richer Speysides as opposed to the 'easy' ones I'd been pushed towards.

    For someone trying to get into whisky I'd suggest buying a few miniatures from each of the regions and trying 2 or 3 at a time until you start to work out what you like. From a collection of say:

    Islands - Talisker and Highland Park
    Speyside - Glenfarclas and Cragganmore
    Highlands - Dalwhinnie and Clynelish
    Islay - Lagavulin and Ardbeg
    Campbletown - Springbank and Longrow (same distillery, very different whisky)
    Lowland - Glenkinchie and Bladnoch

    Most people will start to find out what they like. It takes time but the 'effort' is generally enjoyable.

    There used to be 3 or 4 of us from here met up and tried a few whiskies, if anyone fancied it again I'd be keen.
    I've made it a new year's resolution to get into whisky (I think I slightly missed the point of resolutions with this one - so a second to run a marathon was added), and it's interesting that you mention that myth of spayside for bigenners as that was the general advice I'd been getting.

    I like the idea with the miniatures though and think I'll go for that approach. Thanks for the list of recommendations for each area!

    I've done a couple distillery tours and found them very interesting, being able to really enjoy the tasting session at the end would be good.

    Thanks!

  22. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Scouse Hibee View Post
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    Jeez not being a whisky man at all I tried a small Highkand Park at my Dad's last week.........****** horrible.
    I would agree with you Scouse if that was the only whisky I tried. Really not one for the smokey/Peaty ones at all. However, I've recently learned there are a few that I REALLY like and like the more I drink them.

    Snooky mentioned Aberlour and Macallan's which are two very agreeable ones in my opinion.

    Glenlivet is my go to safe whisky just now - but I was recently introduced to a 12 year old Ben Riach (sherry cask) and it is possibly my favourite. Lovely it was.

    I would recommend trying any of the above and sip away (even if it's after a few pints when moving onto 'nip stage')

    Also don't be put-off if you don't love it the first few tastes. I don't think anyone likes whisky the first time they drink it!

  23. #83
    Tin-hat and ready to be shot-down/laughed at.

    But as far as your cheap/supermarket budget drinks goes - I can't half tolerate Grant's Whisky

    Genuinely.

    (this came from drinking it after a few beers at cheltenham without knowing what the whisky was... really enjoying it I thought I'd ask what it was, expecting some fancy whisky to take note of).. clueless bartender turned round the bottle and revealed it was 'Grant's'

    Turned the racing bender into a blender

  24. #84
    @hibs.net private member Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WeeRussell View Post
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    Tin-hat and ready to be shot-down/laughed at.

    But as far as your cheap/supermarket budget drinks goes - I can't half tolerate Grant's Whisky

    Genuinely.

    (this came from drinking it after a few beers at cheltenham without knowing what the whisky was... really enjoying it I thought I'd ask what it was, expecting some fancy whisky to take note of).. clueless bartender turned round the bottle and revealed it was 'Grant's'

    Turned the racing bender into a blender
    If Grant's does it for you then there's no need to justify yourself. I don't mind it either and I recommend the ale and sherry cask finish editions...very nice with a splash of water (none of this mixing nonsense)

  25. #85
    @hibs.net private member Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pretty Boy View Post
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    Tbh I've always found the idea that people need to start on a 'beginners' whisky a bit of a myth. I think people just like what they like.

    I followed the same path of trying some of the quite frankly bland Speysides thinking I would develop a taste. It was only when I tried the likes of Talisker and Ardbeg that I fell in love with whisky. The peatiness, smokiness and warmth appealed far more than anything I had tasted previously. From there I was able to begin to appreciate the various whiskies from Springbank (the distillery producing by far the best whisky in Scotland at the moment), the likes of Old Pultney, Highland Park and other whiskies with brine and smoke pouring from them. I also began to appreciate the richer Speysides as opposed to the 'easy' ones I'd been pushed towards.

    For someone trying to get into whisky I'd suggest buying a few miniatures from each of the regions and trying 2 or 3 at a time until you start to work out what you like. From a collection of say:

    Islands - Talisker and Highland Park
    Speyside - Glenfarclas and Cragganmore
    Highlands - Dalwhinnie and Clynelish
    Islay - Lagavulin and Ardbeg
    Campbletown - Springbank and Longrow (same distillery, very different whisky)
    Lowland - Glenkinchie and Bladnoch

    Most people will start to find out what they like. It takes time but the 'effort' is generally enjoyable.

    There used to be 3 or 4 of us from here met up and tried a few whiskies, if anyone fancied it again I'd be keen.
    Agree with this. Single tasting sessions that cover most of the spectrum can help you understand the contrasts.

    I'd leave something like Johnnie Walker double black until the end though. I've just sampled the bottle my dad bought me (his favourite dram) and flavour wise, it's big.

  26. #86
    @hibs.net private member TRC's Avatar
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    The snobbery that surrounds malts is the thing that does my nut in. When I first moved to Sweden I did whisky tasting nights in a Hotel and one month I did some blended whiskies, had tons of people telling me it wasn't proper whisky. The funny thing is ask any distiller in the world and they'll tell you that making a blend is a far more difficult process than making a malt. It's the nature of the beast if the blend doesn't taste how it has done for the last forty years, then the old boy down the pub who has drunk the same whisky for thirty years will taste it straight away, with a malt there is a little more leeway.

  27. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
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    If Grant's does it for you then there's no need to justify yourself. I don't mind it either and I recommend the ale and sherry cask finish editions...very nice with a splash of water (none of this mixing nonsense)
    As I said in previous post I really liked the sherry edition of Benriach I was drinking, so will look out for that!

    I've become a very much 'as it comes' man with the whisky though. Only ever used to put ice in it (Macallan's with a block of ice back when I was 'forced' to have a whisky!) but recently it's always been neat for me.

    Do appreciate it's 'meant' to change depending on what whisky you drink though.

    Agree on the no mixer part though (although lemonade and whisky was the first night I actually "liked" whisky.. drank that many that I enjoyed it by the end )

  28. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by TRC View Post
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    The snobbery that surrounds malts is the thing that does my nut in. When I first moved to Sweden I did whisky tasting nights in a Hotel and one month I did some blended whiskies, had tons of people telling me it wasn't proper whisky. The funny thing is ask any distiller in the world and they'll tell you that making a blend is a far more difficult process than making a malt. It's the nature of the beast if the blend doesn't taste how it has done for the last forty years, then the old boy down the pub who has drunk the same whisky for thirty years will taste it straight away, with a malt there is a little more leeway.
    All malt whisky, with the exception of single cask, is blended anyway.

    A distillery doesn't open a cask on the exact date it was filled 10, 15 or 20 years later. They take a range of casks and blend them to achieve a consistency of flavour. Single malt simply refers to the fact a whisky is made from malted barley at a single distillery and the age statement refers to the youngest whisky used.

    Re people getting sniffy about blends. Not something I understand really. There are many good blends out there and, increasingly in recent years, a lot of crap malts.
    I fell in love with football as I was later to fall in love with women,. Suddenly, uncritically giving no thought to the pain it could bring. - Nick Hornby

  29. #89
    Testimonial Due Hibee87's Avatar
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    I grew up drinking the usual bourbons jack d, southern comfort etc. I think i drank enough jack d over the years that I actually don't like it that much any more, and i really dont like coke at all!

    I found some of the better bourbons bullitt, monkey shoulder etc mixed with dr pepper to be a very nice drink.

    Any way, I do like malts and decided like someone else this year I was going to try getting into it more so the mrs got me a bottle of Ardmore legacy and I found it to be a nice smoth drink. The others I have tried tended to have a real stronger peaty taske like laphroig (sp?) and I enjoyed them far more.
    Luckily my mate works in a whiskey shop up ythe royal mile and does all the tours etc so im planning on meeting up with him to go for tasters. In my youth i thought whiskey tasted like whiskey and wasnt keen but now I do notice the difference and appreciate it more so with a bit of his help on which ones I like I hope to learn a bit more about what ones to go for and start to stock up my collection. My only problem is the grief I get for actually drinking it, she gets me a bottle then moans that ive drank it over a couple of weekends, go figure eh.

  30. #90
    @hibs.net private member snooky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hibee87 View Post
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    I grew up drinking the usual bourbons jack d, southern comfort etc. I think i drank enough jack d over the years that I actually don't like it that much any more, and i really dont like coke at all!

    I found some of the better bourbons bullitt, monkey shoulder etc mixed with dr pepper to be a very nice drink.

    Any way, I do like malts and decided like someone else this year I was going to try getting into it more so the mrs got me a bottle of Ardmore legacy and I found it to be a nice smoth drink. The others I have tried tended to have a real stronger peaty taske like laphroig (sp?) and I enjoyed them far more.
    Luckily my mate works in a whiskey shop up ythe royal mile and does all the tours etc so im planning on meeting up with him to go for tasters. In my youth i thought whiskey tasted like whiskey and wasnt keen but now I do notice the difference and appreciate it more so with a bit of his help on which ones I like I hope to learn a bit more about what ones to go for and start to stock up my collection. My only problem is the grief I get for actually drinking it, she gets me a bottle then moans that ive drank it over a couple of weekends, go figure eh.
    Oh dear, and you were doing so well too.

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