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johnbc70
09-06-2012, 04:47 PM
Was down at Leith Links today for the Gala Day, was a great day out and my daughter loved the pony rides and the bouncy castle. What really struck me though was the number of dogs that where there that looked like those pit bulls, staffies etc. I am no dog expert but the amount of dogs these days that look like that is really alarming. It also always seems to be a certain type of person that has these dogs, they almost seem to have them as some sort of 'look at me I am hard' symbol. Maybe time to bring back dog license's as a lot of these people seem to only have the dog as some sort of accessory to make them look hard.

blackpoolhibs
09-06-2012, 05:05 PM
Was down at Leith Links today for the Gala Day, was a great day out and my daughter loved the pony rides and the bouncy castle. What really struck me though was the number of dogs that where there that looked like those pit bulls, staffies etc. I am no dog expert but the amount of dogs these days that look like that is really alarming. It also always seems to be a certain type of person that has these dogs, they almost seem to have them as some sort of 'look at me I am hard' symbol. Maybe time to bring back dog license's as a lot of these people seem to only have the dog as some sort of accessory to make them look hard.

I see the same thing here in blackpool, as someone who's had a lot of dogs, i dont see the attraction of these type of dogs. I love labs, and my last one a black lab was probably the best friend i have ever had.

I personally cant take to these staffies or pitbull dogs, and as you say, the type of person that own them do seem the **** of the earth, although i do concede some wont be.

Jonnyboy
09-06-2012, 06:04 PM
Was down at Leith Links today for the Gala Day, was a great day out and my daughter loved the pony rides and the bouncy castle. What really struck me though was the number of dogs that where there that looked like those pit bulls, staffies etc. I am no dog expert but the amount of dogs these days that look like that is really alarming. It also always seems to be a certain type of person that has these dogs, they almost seem to have them as some sort of 'look at me I am hard' symbol. Maybe time to bring back dog license's as a lot of these people seem to only have the dog as some sort of accessory to make them look hard.

Nail on the head IMO John :agree:

easty
09-06-2012, 06:12 PM
I see the same thing here in blackpool, as someone who's had a lot of dogs, i dont see the attraction of these type of dogs. I love labs, and my last one a black lab was probably the best friend i have ever had.

I personally cant take to these staffies or pitbull dogs, and as you say, the type of person that own them do seem the **** of the earth, although i do concede some wont be.

I've got a Stafford cross. Me and my missus, a vet, got it as a pup from the sspca. Staffies are brilliant dogs. But then basically any dog has the potential to be a great pet. Dinnae blame the dogs for the ****er owners who think getting their dogs to bark at and bite folk is "training".

Jonnyboy
09-06-2012, 06:16 PM
I've got a Stafford cross. Me and my missus, a vet, got it as a pup from the sspca. Staffies are brilliant dogs. But then basically any dog has the potential to be a great pet. Dinnae blame the dogs for the ****er owners who think getting their dogs to bark at and bite folk is "training".

Fair point easty and I apologise for suggesting all such owners are neds.

I should know better as owner of two Dobermanns, a breed that also attracts bad press.

Basically, any dog will be aggressive if it's trained to be by its owner IMO

stoneyburn hibs
09-06-2012, 06:26 PM
I see the same thing here in blackpool, as someone who's had a lot of dogs, i dont see the attraction of these type of dogs. I love labs, and my last one a black lab was probably the best friend i have ever had.

I personally cant take to these staffies or pitbull dogs, and as you say, the type of person that own them do seem the **** of the earth, although i do concede some wont be.

Black lab is what i have , had him since he was a puppy and a bigger sook you will not find.

Staffies/pitbull's are sadly used as an accessory by the majority of there owners and most of these owners appear to have a want about them.

blackpoolhibs
09-06-2012, 06:27 PM
I've got a Stafford cross. Me and my missus, a vet, got it as a pup from the sspca. Staffies are brilliant dogs. But then basically any dog has the potential to be a great pet. Dinnae blame the dogs for the ****er owners who think getting their dogs to bark at and bite folk is "training".

I think you need to read my post again? :confused:

AFKA5814_Hibs
09-06-2012, 07:37 PM
Last year my mother in law looked after a Staffordshire Bull Terrier for 3 weeks when her friend went on holiday and I have to say it was one of the friendliest dogs i've seen.

Having 2 kids in the house I must admit to being a bit apprehensive at first when she brought the dog around but it got on brilliantly with the whole family. :aok:

Just a pity that so many neds have these dogs and probably cause of the way they treat them they turn out to be vicious animals.

HibeeSince85
09-06-2012, 07:42 PM
Last year my mother in law looked after a Staffordshire Bull Terrier for 3 weeks when her friend went on holiday and I have to say it was one of the friendliest dogs i've seen.

Having 2 kids in the house I must admit to being a bit apprehensive at first when she brought the dog around but it got on brilliantly with the whole family. :aok:

Just a pity that so many neds have these dogs and probably cause of the way they treat them they turn out to be vicious animals.

I think you've hit the nail firmly on the head there mate.

Anyone ever watched the dog whisperer?

Remember Daddy?

johnbc70
09-06-2012, 07:55 PM
I am not suggesting that everyone that has a staffie or a pit bull is a 'certain type' and I know some people own these dogs and treat them the way they should be treated but the last few years there seem to be more and more and they are pretty much all owned by neds from what I can see. Just think if you had to get some kind of license system it would put some people off just getting them as an accessory to look 'hard'. These type of dogs have it in their genes to attack so if you are in the wrong place at the wrong time then watch out, as many small children have found to their cost the last few years.

AFKA5814_Hibs
09-06-2012, 08:13 PM
There should be a license for certain breeds of dogs to ensure that only responsible/sensible folk have these dogs.

There was a recent story of the dog Big Daddy which went on the rampage in Leith, Banana flats I think. That dog was obscene, weighed about 15 stone and was owned by junkies. The dog was later destroyed, maybe they should have done the same to the owners.

VickMackie
09-06-2012, 08:15 PM
Don't trust them one bit. It only takes the one time for them to snap.

IMO they are inherently vicious.

Hainan Hibs
09-06-2012, 08:16 PM
I think you've hit the nail firmly on the head there mate.

Anyone ever watched the dog whisperer?

Remember Daddy?

What a dog:thumbsup:

I take a look now and again at the SSPCA website and the majority of dogs are staffordshire bull terriers. I think the behaviour that has given them their reputation is due to the type of owners they typically have.

While living in Aberdeen the flat above me was occupied by a right neddy couple who were the definition of **** of the earth. They had two staffie's who they never stopped screaming and shouting at, and the daily walk amounted to being let loose in the garden for a grand total of 20 seconds before being told "get the **** back in". Broke my heart:boo hoo:.

The dogs seemed good natured but were only young, you have to wonder what state they will be in after another few years of that.

Agree completely that it is a "look at how hard I am" symbol, usually made very often by skinny lanky neds.

DH1875
09-06-2012, 10:18 PM
I've got a staff :duck:.

Their reputation is totally unjust in my opinion. Train them right and they are second to none as a breed and are extremely family friendly. My dog is a cracker and if I don't say so myself, very intelligent. She is so loving and loves to be around people. She's never as much as growled at anyone let alone our 2 kids. They need a strong leader though or they will take the P and you HAVE to socialize them with other dogs.

Baw Baggio
09-06-2012, 10:19 PM
Was down at Leith Links today for the Gala Day, was a great day out and my daughter loved the pony rides and the bouncy castle. What really struck me though was the number of dogs that where there that looked like those pit bulls, staffies etc. I am no dog expert but the amount of dogs these days that look like that is really alarming. It also always seems to be a certain type of person that has these dogs, they almost seem to have them as some sort of 'look at me I am hard' symbol. Maybe time to bring back dog license's as a lot of these people seem to only have the dog as some sort of accessory to make them look hard.


I see the same thing here in blackpool, as someone who's had a lot of dogs, i dont see the attraction of these type of dogs. I love labs, and my last one a black lab was probably the best friend i have ever had.

I personally cant take to these staffies or pitbull dogs, and as you say, the type of person that own them do seem the **** of the earth, although i do concede some wont be.


Don't trust them one bit. It only takes the one time for them to snap.

IMO they are inherently vicious.


May I ask if any of you have had personal experience with Staffies or is your opinion based entirely on newspaper stories?



I am not suggesting that everyone that has a staffie or a pit bull is a 'certain type' and I know some people own these dogs and treat them the way they should be treated but the last few years there seem to be more and more and they are pretty much all owned by neds from what I can see. Just think if you had to get some kind of license system it would put some people off just getting them as an accessory to look 'hard'. These type of dogs have it in their genes to attack so if you are in the wrong place at the wrong time then watch out, as many small children have found to their cost the last few years.

And you've contradicted yourself.

I was at the gala day with my Staffie, close to the ponies you mentioned earlier. I have a degree in chemistry, I'm fully employed, I own my house and I'm married to an accountant.

My friend was with us at the gala, with her staffie. She's a qualified nurse, has bought her own house and is a skinny wee lassie.

We met one other staffie owner at the gala, some middle aged dutch guy there with his kids, really down to earth.

3 staffie owners, I wouldn't describe any of us as neds :dunno:


I see the same thing here in blackpool, as someone who's had a lot of dogs, i dont see the attraction of these type of dogs. I love labs, and my last one a black lab was probably the best friend i have ever had.


I've been around a few different breeds since I was a nipper - Lab, Retriever, Collies, red setter - without a doubt my staffie has been the best dog I've ever had. Very sociable, great wee personality, well behaved and great with kids.

http://www.the-kennel-club.org.uk/services/public/breed/display.aspx?id=3080


One of the most popular of all the terriers, the Staffordshire is renowned for his courage, which unfortunately can lead him into bad ways with other dogs owing to his tendency to ‘get his retaliation in first’. With the human race, however, he is kindness itself, and his genuine love of children is well known. He is descended from a cross between the Bulldog and a terrier, and thus combines the temperaments of the two breeds.

Hibernia&Alba
09-06-2012, 10:23 PM
Strange coincidence this thread should appear. Neighbour of ours had to have their Staffie destroyed just a couple of days ago when it killed another dog on the park. Up to that point it hadn't displayed any indication of aggression, it just snapped and had to be put down. I don't know how common such tragedies are, but it isn't unheard of. The only good thing is that another dog was killed rather than a child. It could have been even worse.

heretoday
09-06-2012, 10:44 PM
It's not the dogs. it's the owners. If the owner is an ignorant ned the dog will behave accordingly.

VickMackie
09-06-2012, 10:49 PM
I have both experiences, good and bad. The bad one is down to the owner.

I still think they are too dangerous to risk having around. They're too strong if they snap.

johnbc70
09-06-2012, 11:03 PM
May I ask if any of you have had personal experience with Staffies or is your opinion based entirely on newspaper stories?




And you've contradicted yourself.

I was at the gala day with my Staffie, close to the ponies you mentioned earlier. I have a degree in chemistry, I'm fully employed, I own my house and I'm married to an accountant.

My friend was with us at the gala, with her staffie. She's a qualified nurse, has bought her own house and is a skinny wee lassie.

We met one other staffie owner at the gala, some middle aged dutch guy there with his kids, really down to earth.

3 staffie owners, I wouldn't describe any of us as neds :dunno:



I've been around a few different breeds since I was a nipper - Lab, Retriever, Collies, red setter - without a doubt my staffie has been the best dog I've ever had. Very sociable, great wee personality, well behaved and great with kids.

http://www.the-kennel-club.org.uk/services/public/breed/display.aspx?id=3080

I did say that I am sure there are many owners who are not 'neds' and treat their dogs well. I am just saying, and I do not think many can deny, there is a rising trend for neds to own certain breeds of dog as some type of status symbol and people like you are I would now say in the minority that own these type of dogs.

Beefster
09-06-2012, 11:28 PM
I've got a staff :duck:.

Their reputation is totally unjust in my opinion. Train them right and they are second to none as a breed and are extremely family friendly. My dog is a cracker and if I don't say so myself, very intelligent. She is so loving and loves to be around people. She's never as much as growled at anyone let alone our 2 kids. They need a strong leader though or they will take the P and you HAVE to socialize them with other dogs.

I think that's part of the problem with Staffies - they have to be trained right and can be problematic if not. I have a Golden Retriever with a great temperament (which is just as well considering he has a 4 year old climbing over him constantly) but he'd have a great temperament and absolutely no aggression towards people, dogs or anything, whether I had trained him properly or not.

In my experience, you won't get that with most Staffies, unless they have been trained properly from an early age. We looked at getting one from a rescue home but knowing that most of them wouldn't have been trained properly from pup meant that we decided against it in the end. Too much of a risk with a kid running about the house.

Dashing Bob S
09-06-2012, 11:36 PM
There's two attractions with aggressive breeds of dog for those slack-jawed, drooling, under-educated weeds. The first, as has been said, is to make them look hard. The second, is that aggressive breeds paradoxically tend to be the most loyal to their masters. Those dogs are about the only living creatures on this planet who can unconditionally love the type of troll who is so drawn to them.

Yes, staffies, rotties, mastiffs etc are inherently aggressive breeds. But as has been said, a dog tends to mirror its owner. If they've been treated well, loved and respected, they are generally the sweetest animals. But yes, there is always the problem of mental illness or just old age crotchiness in any dog. In such case a poodle is a hassle, a pitbull, a potential disaster. You run that risk with any dog, but the risks are obviously greater with an aggressive breed.

Two basic rules:

1. Older dogs in this breed are not a good idea around small children.

2. One dog only. They are pack beasts. One staffie could be a great pet, two is asking for trouble.

The nicest dog I've ever met was a black lab/rotweiller cross. It had the best of both breeds. A big, smart, loving pet and faithful chum.

Rossco1875
10-06-2012, 06:22 PM
I have a staffie boxer cross who we got from the cat and dog home when he was just about a year old and he is the most well behaved and friendly dog I have had we did not even have to teech him much to be honest, In the two years we have had him I dont think he has even shown any sign of aggresion at all just a big sook.

I also know a lot of family and friends that have staffie's and all of them are really friendly well behaved dogs. It really depends on the owner and their upbringing as I have also seen people who have raised these dogs the wrong way and the diffrence in behaviour.

Matty_Jack04
10-06-2012, 07:06 PM
You get an extra £40 (I think it's 40) in your giro if u own a dog there's your ned + staffie connection

I agree with all the points regarding training and owners behaviour making up how they are though I still don't like them wouldn't have one myself but each to their own

VickMackie
10-06-2012, 07:20 PM
You get an extra £40 (I think it's 40) in your giro if u own a dog there's your ned + staffie connection

I agree with all the points regarding training and owners behaviour making up how they are though I still don't like them wouldn't have one myself but each to their own

Seriously? Never heard of that before.

yeezus.
10-06-2012, 11:16 PM
Was down at Leith Links today for the Gala Day, was a great day out and my daughter loved the pony rides and the bouncy castle. What really struck me though was the number of dogs that where there that looked like those pit bulls, staffies etc. I am no dog expert but the amount of dogs these days that look like that is really alarming. It also always seems to be a certain type of person that has these dogs, they almost seem to have them as some sort of 'look at me I am hard' symbol. Maybe time to bring back dog license's as a lot of these people seem to only have the dog as some sort of accessory to make them look hard.

It's a shame for the breed. We own a Staffie and have tattoo's ... but we aren't what you would consider "****". I think you are generalizing a bit as well.

yeezus.
10-06-2012, 11:18 PM
I have a staffie boxer cross who we got from the cat and dog home when he was just about a year old and he is the most well behaved and friendly dog I have had we did not even have to teech him much to be honest, In the two years we have had him I dont think he has even shown any sign of aggresion at all just a big sook.

I also know a lot of family and friends that have staffie's and all of them are really friendly well behaved dogs. It really depends on the owner and their upbringing as I have also seen people who have raised these dogs the wrong way and the diffrence in behaviour.

:thumbsup:too much snobbery and generalizing from people on here.

chinaman
11-06-2012, 06:11 AM
I am not suggesting that everyone that has a staffie or a pit bull is a 'certain type' and I know some people own these dogs and treat them the way they should be treated but the last few years there seem to be more and more and they are pretty much all owned by neds from what I can see. Just think if you had to get some kind of license system it would put some people off just getting them as an accessory to look 'hard'. These type of dogs have it in their genes to attack so if you are in the wrong place at the wrong time then watch out, as many small children have found to their cost the last few years.so your an expert eh? how many staffs or pitbulls you owned then to make such an expert analysis on these dogs that HAVE IT IN THERE GENES TO ATTACK CHILDREN . stop blowing out yer erchie and believing wot the sun and ****** spout . blame the white trash who own these great dogs for no other reason than they think it portrays them as something

VickMackie
11-06-2012, 07:55 AM
so your an expert eh? how many staffs or pitbulls you owned then to make such an expert analysis on these dogs that HAVE IT IN THERE GENES TO ATTACK CHILDREN . stop blowing out yer erchie and believing wot the sun and ****** spout . blame the white trash who own these great dogs for no other reason than they think it portrays them as something

So are you of the opinion that if neds all started buying King Charles' and treated them in the same manner as they do staffies etc they would have the same behaviour AND pose the same level of threat to kids and other people?

For me it's all about the potential danger.

StevesFamau5
11-06-2012, 08:03 AM
A dog is defined by the company it is with. The family it stands by and the teaching it is given. I would hazard a guess and say that most so called dangerous dogs like any other look up to the lack leader. If he/she is a knuckle dragging tax dodging never washing ****bag then the dog will see oubursts of svummy behaviour and only act based on visual perception. I've had a staffy cross pitbull as a pup and she was the dopiest sweetest wee gurl ever. Not an ounce of anger or violence in her in fact she was confused by a hamster. Its almost impossible to distinguish a breed as being violent out right. Its the set up the dog has that may define its behaviour. Example sled dogs and other wolf hybrids. Loyal strong and without fear. Bred for work adapted for anyone. The way i see it. Even the cutest little westie could be prone to outbursts of violence if brought up wrong. Dogs mans best friend :)

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

easty
11-06-2012, 08:26 AM
So are you of the opinion that if neds all started buying King Charles' and treated them in the same manner as they do staffies etc they would have the same behaviour AND pose the same level of threat to kids and other people?

For me it's all about the potential danger.

make sure to put a protective helmet on next time you cross the road. you never know when a dangerous driver is about. :rolleyes:

Judas Iscariot
11-06-2012, 08:31 AM
Some utter pish being spouted in here, too many Daily Record & Sun fanboys creaming over the "Devil Dog" write ups..

I own 2 Staffordshire Bull Terriers and they are the 2 friendliest dogs you'll ever meet, the breed themselves are well known for their love and affection towards humans especially children..

I'm guessing SBT's are not nicknamed the "Nanny Dog" due to their rabid hatred for kids!?

I've been around all different breeds of dog when growing up, Rottweiler, GSD, Staffies, Golden and Black labs, collies, mungrels etc and the only time I have been bitten was from a Golden Lab and a Collie!

Not any of the "Devil Dug" Rotties, Staffies or Alsatians that I spent far more time around than the collie/lab as we got rid due to them biting!

I don't class ALL Collies or ALL Golden Labs as evil dogs 'cos I was bit from them, each dog is different and every dog has the potential to bite or to go crazy, they are animals afterall, plenty humans do a whole lot worse than a simple dog but hey ho, lets tar one breed with the same brush!

Most people that have owned a Staff or been in close contact with one over a period of time will tell you just how loving, loyal, gentle, intelligent and generally placid these excellent family pets are!

Please dont be confused over a genuine Staffordshire Bull Terrier and some mungrel that has been crossed with a staffy and something else BIGGER at one time in it's gene pool to make it look "Scary", most of these "Neds" couldnt afford a proper Staff so buy these "staffie crosses" which get the "Pitbull" tags..

easty
11-06-2012, 08:36 AM
My girlfriend treats hundreds of dogs (maybe not quite that many) every week, she's never had any issue with a staffie. She works in Tranent, Prestonpans, Dunbar and North Berwick, so you'd have to assume she sees a fair few schemies.

In fact, the only dogs she'd say she's wary about are alsatians, as there have been a few times they've went a mental and went for her.

If you give 100 neds a staffie and 1 of them attacks someone or someones dog, then all staffies seem to get a bad name.

Here's my wee staffie cross, Cabbage, wouldnt hurt a fly. (birds are another matter though.....she doesnt like seagulls at the beach:greengrin)

8345

VickMackie
11-06-2012, 10:27 AM
Judas may have hot the nail on the head about all the cross breed mongrels.

Either way, people on this thread can spout pish about others that have concerns about their type of dog.

The bottom line is I don't trust them. How do I know if you've treated your dog well in its upbringing when my kid wants to clap it or it runs a jumps on her out of excitement.

Too many getting upset I think!

Pretty Boy
11-06-2012, 10:35 AM
I've got 2 dogs.

A boxer I've had for about 3 years and a rotweiller I recently got from the cat and dog home. Having heard the background of the rottie if he was a 'devil dog' I wouldn't have blamed him, previously owned by absolute ****.

What my rottie needed was a bit attention, love and discipline. He's now a big softy who would most likely lick you to death. Him and his boxer mate are now best pals, although he is still wary around other dogs.

Dogs look for leadership. If an owner encourages aggressive or destructive behaviour then the dog will duly oblige. That goes for all breeds not just staffies, rotties etc.

easty
11-06-2012, 10:44 AM
Judas may have hot the nail on the head about all the cross breed mongrels.

Either way, people on this thread can spout pish about others that have concerns about their type of dog.

The bottom line is I don't trust them. How do I know if you've treated your dog well in its upbringing when my kid wants to clap it or it runs a jumps on her out of excitement.

Too many getting upset I think!

I'd maybe say you should train your kids not to run up to dogs, that they dont know, to clap them. Because, how does my dog know if you've brought up your kid well.

It's far more often that I'll have kids running over to pet my dog than my dog running over and jumping on kids. She gets a fright and runs to hide behind me.

Judas Iscariot
11-06-2012, 10:52 AM
Staffy cross/pitbull..

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/images14/irishstaffordshirebullterrierbostonblue.jpg

Staffy..

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1a/Staffordshire_Bull_Terrier_600.jpg/220px-Staffordshire_Bull_Terrier_600.jpg


Pure bred staffy's are small dogs, should be no taller than 16", not these long legged crosses that people seem to think are SBT's...

Pretty Boy
11-06-2012, 11:08 AM
I'd maybe say you should train your kids not to run up to dogs, that they dont know, to clap them. Because, how does my dog know if you've brought up your kid well.

It's far more often that I'll have kids running over to pet my dog than my dog running over and jumping on kids. She gets a fright and runs to hide behind me.

Agree with this.

The number of kids who run up and wrap their arms around my dogs neck pr grab his cheeks is unbelievable. He doesn't really like it although he will tolerate it.

If he did react badly one time no doubt the same parents who let their child run up to a strange dog would brand him a monster.

VickMackie
11-06-2012, 11:09 AM
I'd maybe say you should train your kids not to run up to dogs, that they dont know, to clap them. Because, how does my dog know if you've brought up your kid well.

It's far more often that I'll have kids running over to pet my dog than my dog running over and jumping on kids. She gets a fright and runs to hide behind me.

I knew this argument would be brought up. My kids not going to bite a dog to shreds with love!

And I keep them away from larger dogs as much as I can.

Judas Iscariot
11-06-2012, 11:20 AM
I knew this argument would be brought up. My kids not going to bite a dog to shreds with love!

And I keep them away from larger dogs as much as I can.

Good, cause all the large dogs are the worst

Beefster
11-06-2012, 11:37 AM
If he did react badly one time no doubt the same parents who let their child run up to a strange dog would brand him a monster.

Perish the thought that a dog that attacks a kid with no provocation is branded a 'monster'.

If a dog runs up to me looking for a clap, is it okay for me to take a baseball bat and my size 10 boots to it?

VickMackie
11-06-2012, 11:38 AM
Good, cause all the large dogs are the worst

Not at all. Just my preference.

easty
11-06-2012, 11:52 AM
Perish the thought that a dog that attacks a kid with no provocation is branded a 'monster'.

If a dog runs up to me looking for a clap, is it okay for me to take a baseball bat and my size 10 boots to it?

Just because it seems like "no provocation" to you, doesnt mean that's how a dog would percieve it. Bairns running up, jumping about and screaming towards my dog occassionaly scares her. It wouldnt scare all dogs though, some could quite easily see that as a situation to defend themselves.

Pretty Boy
11-06-2012, 11:52 AM
Perish the thought that a dog that attacks a kid with no provocation is branded a 'monster'.

If a dog runs up to me looking for a clap, is it okay for me to take a baseball bat and my size 10 boots to it?

No provocation?

So running up to an animal throwing your arms around its neck and restrictings its head movement, trying to climb on its back or grabbing its.cheeks and shaking violently isn't provocation?

That's some of what my dogs, especially the boxer, puts up with when I take him to the park. They are both well behaved and take it well but parents don't know this when they allow their kids to run up to them.

Most dogs are pretty good with kids and will respond with good.nature to prodding and clapping etc but to allow a child to go up to a dog you don't know is madness.

Judas Iscariot
11-06-2012, 12:10 PM
I reckon there's a bigger call for all "Devil Bairns" to be kept on leads & muzzled..

RyeSloan
11-06-2012, 12:16 PM
No provocation?

So running up to an animal throwing your arms around its neck and restrictings its head movement, trying to climb on its back or grabbing its.cheeks and shaking violently isn't provocation?

That's some of what my dogs, especially the boxer, puts up with when I take him to the park. They are both well behaved and take it well but parents don't know this when they allow their kids to run up to them.

Most dogs are pretty good with kids and will respond with good.nature to prodding and clapping etc but to allow a child to go up to a dog you don't know is madness.


Seems somewhat bizarre that you accuse parents of 'letting this happen' but then suggest the dog that reacts by biting the child is blameless. There is also plenty incidents I have seen where the dogs are running free and approach the child/adult rather than the other way around.

I would suggest it is the dog owners responsibility to make sure that their animal is kept under control if around children to make sure no harm is done to the child unless you are suggesting it is the children should be kept on a leash at all times to stop them running up to a dog...

easty
11-06-2012, 12:28 PM
Seems somewhat bizarre that you accuse parents of 'letting this happen' but then suggest the dog that reacts by biting the child is blameless. There is also plenty incidents I have seen where the dogs are running free and approach the child/adult rather than the other way around.

I would suggest it is the dog owners responsibility to make sure that their animal is kept under control if around children to make sure no harm is done to the child unless you are suggesting it is the children should be kept on a leash at all times to stop them running up to a dog...

My dogs actually really good with children, probably because my cul-de-sac is always full of the neighbours bairns and they always want to pet her. However, I walk my dog in St Margarets Park and when I'm out on the field with the dog there are usually a number of kids in the playpark. If those kids decide to run out the park and towards me and my dog then it's absolutley up to the kids parents to keep them under control, rather than for me to take my dog to another part of the field.

I dont have any problem with random people wanting to pet my dog, but when it's kids who run over screaming, arms flailing and jumping about like mad it does become a problem. They frighten my dog.....and do my heid in.

Pretty Boy
11-06-2012, 12:30 PM
Seems somewhat bizarre that you accuse parents of 'letting this happen' but then suggest the dog that reacts by biting the child is blameless. There is also plenty incidents I have seen where the dogs are running free and approach the child/adult rather than the other way around.

I would suggest it is the dog owners responsibility to make sure that their animal is kept under control if around children to make sure no harm is done to the child unless you are suggesting it is the children should be kept on a leash at all times to stop them running up to a dog...

I'm suggesting its a 2 way thing.

A responsible dog owner will keep their dog either on a lead or to heel when in an area near kids. Equally parent should keep their children under control and not allow them to approach dogs they don't know without the owners permission.

The dog isn't blameless, of course not. A well trained dog will almost never resort to biting. But if a dog does feel threatened by a child then the parent isn't blameless either.

StevesFamau5
11-06-2012, 12:52 PM
Larger dogs???? Really the worst? Rubbish! As i tried to explain earlier a dog is defined by setting up-bringing and socialisation. Yes some breeds may LOOK more aggressive but the dog its self is not the worry. Large dogs may have the physical strength but the mentailty is drilled into them by the owner.

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

Judas Iscariot
11-06-2012, 12:58 PM
Larger dogs???? Really the worst? Rubbish! As i tried to explain earlier a dog is defined by setting up-bringing and socialisation. Yes some breeds may LOOK more aggressive but the dog its self is not the worry. Large dogs may have the physical strength but the mentailty is drilled into them by the owner.

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

Whoosh

yeezus.
11-06-2012, 01:17 PM
Larger dogs???? Really the worst? Rubbish! As i tried to explain earlier a dog is defined by setting up-bringing and socialisation. Yes some breeds may LOOK more aggressive but the dog its self is not the worry. Large dogs may have the physical strength but the mentailty is drilled into them by the owner.

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

:top marks

Future17
11-06-2012, 01:23 PM
I was at the gala day with my Staffie, close to the ponies you mentioned earlier. I have a degree in chemistry, I'm fully employed, I own my house and I'm married to an accountant.

My friend was with us at the gala, with her staffie. She's a qualified nurse, has bought her own house and is a skinny wee lassie.

We met one other staffie owner at the gala, some middle aged dutch guy there with his kids, really down to earth.

3 staffie owners, I wouldn't describe any of us as neds :dunno:

To be fair, your friend is skinny from due to her drug addiction, which led her to become your partner in crime - she steals the ingredients from the hospital, you cook it up with your chemistry knowledge in the house you share with your accountant wife who assists you in hiding the proceeds of your misdeeds from HMRC.

Recently, you and your accomplice friend have been able to buy your own houses after profits increased dramatically having accessed the Amsterdam market through your mysterious Dutch acquaintance who you arrange to meet at public gatherings to avoid suspicion.

I'm on to you...and your Staffies!!*




* The foregoing may not be completely accurate and may, in fact, be the product of sleep deprivation, an overactive imagination and an overdose of energy drink.

DH1875
11-06-2012, 04:59 PM
Some utter pish being spouted in here, too many Daily Record & Sun fanboys creaming over the "Devil Dog" write ups..

I own 2 Staffordshire Bull Terriers and they are the 2 friendliest dogs you'll ever meet, the breed themselves are well known for their love and affection towards humans especially children..

I'm guessing SBT's are not nicknamed the "Nanny Dog" due to their rabid hatred for kids!?

I've been around all different breeds of dog when growing up, Rottweiler, GSD, Staffies, Golden and Black labs, collies, mungrels etc and the only time I have been bitten was from a Golden Lab and a Collie!

Not any of the "Devil Dug" Rotties, Staffies or Alsatians that I spent far more time around than the collie/lab as we got rid due to them biting!

I don't class ALL Collies or ALL Golden Labs as evil dogs 'cos I was bit from them, each dog is different and every dog has the potential to bite or to go crazy, they are animals afterall, plenty humans do a whole lot worse than a simple dog but hey ho, lets tar one breed with the same brush!

Most people that have owned a Staff or been in close contact with one over a period of time will tell you just how loving, loyal, gentle, intelligent and generally placid these excellent family pets are!

Please dont be confused over a genuine Staffordshire Bull Terrier and some mungrel that has been crossed with a staffy and something else BIGGER at one time in it's gene pool to make it look "Scary", most of these "Neds" couldnt afford a proper Staff so buy these "staffie crosses" which get the "Pitbull" tags..


My neighbour has a collie and I don't even have to tell my kids to keep away from it. It's a horrible thing and the owners don't have a clue what there doing with it. It barks and growls at anything that moves and is a lot more dangerous than my dog. We were out the front a couple of weeks ago and all the kids in the street were out playing. One of them came over towards us and the dog started going nuts. My neighbour gets it under control and proceeds to tell the wee girl it's OK and not to be scared and to come over and clap him. The neighbor holds the dog by the collar and the wee girl goes over, claps the dog on the head and then BANG. Luckily the wee girl is fine and the guy had the dog by the collar or it would have been a bad one. This dog doesn't come from a bad home, my neighbors are a middle aged couple and the guy owns his own company. They just don't have a clue about dogs and treat the thing as if it was a human baby born into royalty.
Another neighbour had the most horrible little dog you've ever seen. No idea what kinda mongrel it was but looked kinda like a fox but without hair. Anyway all the kids are out in the street playing when all of a sudden there's shouting and screaming. Turns out one of the girls have left the front door open and this dog has just run out the door and jumped onto the back of another little girl and proceeded to bite her in the head, more than once. Again this dog came from a middle class family home and wasn't mistreated. The truth is, your more likely to get bit from a Jack Russell or Yorkie than a Staff. It's just that when they bite it causes more damage and therefore becomes news.
I love my little dog and wouldn't swap her for the world. My two kids adore her and her them but then, all 3 have been taught how to behave around each other.

gringojoe
11-06-2012, 05:12 PM
I've never had a problem with the so called devil dogs it's the yappy wee .... that need watching.

chinaman
11-06-2012, 05:13 PM
So are you of the opinion that if neds all started buying King Charles' and treated them in the same manner as they do staffies etc they would have the same behaviour AND pose the same level of threat to kids and other people?

For me it's all about the potential danger. i owned staffs and a pitbull i also owned a pyrenean mountain dog my sister owns a border terrier none of them ever showed any aggression to the human race ever, cos they were socialised properly and all dogs are potential threats to kids.

HibeeSince85
11-06-2012, 05:38 PM
Nice to see the thread has taken a turn for the worst. Polar opposite opinions over what is just a dug.

I don't own a staffie, never have. I would though, as I would own a rottie, an Alsatian etc if when I was looking I happened to fall in love with the animal.

Too many people generalising here, it's purely down to the upbringing of the dog.

I've got 2 mongrels, one is a whippet cross the other I have no idea:greengrin both fantastic animals who I've had for 11 & 8 years, brought up well and as such act that way, if I had 2 "devil dogs" I'd hazard a guess they would be the exact same.

speedy_gonzales
11-06-2012, 06:47 PM
I'm guessing SBT's are not nicknamed the "Nanny Dog" due to their rabid hatred for kids!?
They are nicknamed the 'Nanny' dog from victorian times. They are not by nature loving, they are extremely defensive. That trait was put to good use when placed in a pram to prevent street gangs kidnapping babies. Stick your hand in the pram, pull out a stump!
I think we can safely say the general consensus is it's the owners of all 'problem' dogs that are to blame. Dogs in general want to be part of the pack, then work up the ranks within the pack until they become top dog. For that reason the dog has to be kept at the bottom of the rank, kept to heel and in-line at all times.
However, we cannot ignore the obvious, all pure bred dogs have been bred for certain traits that man has employed over the years. SBT's were not bred for family pets, they were very much bred for dog fighting, it takes a strong owner to break a staffie and curtail it's fighting instincts.
Regardless, I can pretty much guarantee a higher percentage of smaller, terrier like dogs show aggression and nip(maybe even breaking the skin) than staffies do but they don't make the papers!!

Holmesdale Hibs
11-06-2012, 07:38 PM
Perish the thought that a dog that attacks a kid with no provocation is branded a 'monster'.

If a dog runs up to me looking for a clap, is it okay for me to take a baseball bat and my size 10 boots to it?

It would be absolutely fine with me.

Dogs shouldn't be running up to anyone looking for a clap. They should be on a leash in all public areas. I don't care if some of them are harmless, personally I'd rather not take the chance. And even of they are harmless, I don't want one of them anywhere near me.

The main problem, as has been mentioned already, is wee neds that use dogs as a status symbol and to look hard. These are the most dangerous types because they are like their owner - stupid, not trained or looked after properly and are looking around for someone to have a go at.

Responsible dog owners, which I guess are the majority (although like good cyclists you notice them less)... fair enough. If someone wants to have a dog and look after it properly then thats up to them. But responsible dog owners should remember that not everyone is a dog lover and, even if a dog is harmless, a lot of people would rather not have a dog jumping up at them or chasing their kids.

degenerated
11-06-2012, 07:59 PM
It would be absolutely fine with me.

Dogs shouldn't be running up to anyone looking for a clap. They should be on a leash in all public areas. I don't care if some of them are harmless, personally I'd rather not take the chance. And even of they are harmless, I don't want one of them anywhere near me.

The main problem, as has been mentioned already, is wee neds that use dogs as a status symbol and to look hard. These are the most dangerous types because they are like their owner - stupid, not trained or looked after properly and are looking around for someone to have a go at.

Responsible dog owners, which I guess are the majority (although like good cyclists you notice them less)... fair enough. If someone wants to have a dog and look after it properly then thats up to them. But responsible dog owners should remember that not everyone is a dog lover and, even if a dog is harmless, a lot of people would rather not have a dog jumping up at them or chasing their kids.

Couldn't agree more, I always keep my dog on his lead when people are around. He's incredibly friendly and sociable, and a big softy to boot. But a 16 month old bullmastiff that's 28" tall at the withers an can put his paws on my shoulders, I'm 5'11", careering around like an Exocet missile is more likely to put someone on their erse than anything else.

Bullmastiffs are another bread that have been largely misrepresented by media scare mongering over devil dugs. I've had a golden lab, a collie and a blue Rhone spaniel before and I can categorically state that this big playful chap is the best natured dog I've had, if not a bit boisterous sometimes. His snoring could perhaps be described as aggressive though.

easty
11-06-2012, 08:28 PM
Dogs in general want to be part of the pack, then work up the ranks within the pack until they become top dog.

you're confusing real dogs with, maybe, a cartoon film about dogs where they talk and stuff. otherwise you're just making stuff up.



But responsible dog owners should remember that not everyone is a dog lover and, even if a dog is harmless, a lot of people would rather not have a dog jumping up at them or chasing their kids.

true. but equally, a lot of dog owners don't want kids running over and chasing thier dogs when they're trying to walk them.


I'm 5'11",

short arse :greengrin

Holmesdale Hibs
11-06-2012, 08:35 PM
true. but equally, a lot of dog owners don't want kids running over and chasing thier dogs when they're trying to walk them.



Agree. I wouldn't allow my kids (if I had any) to go anywhere near someone else's dog. I didn't mean that to come out @rsey, just couldn't think of another way to put it. If all dog lovers/haters were like us the we'd be sorted. :wink:

degenerated
11-06-2012, 08:48 PM
I've never owned a pit bull and probably never will if I'm honest but I saw this a while back and thought it quite
interesting.
http://www.pitbullsontheweb.com/petbull/findpit.html

I must confess that prior to get my dog that I erroneously assumed that anything with bull in the name meant it was one of those devil dogs that are essentially a row of teeth and an @rsehole. After doing a bit of research I now realise I was wrong.

I seem to remember in my youth that it was Alsatians, doberman and Rottweilers that were demonised by the tabloid press. Now they are all quite acceptable breeds.

Found this top 10 quite surprising
http://10awesome.com/10-most-aggressive-dogs-in-the-world/

speedy_gonzales
11-06-2012, 10:27 PM
you're confusing real dogs with, maybe, a cartoon film about dogs where they talk and stuff. otherwise you're just making stuff up.

Really? Read point 3 regarding pack mentality (http://www.wikihow.com/Control-Your-Dog's-Behavior-by-Becoming-Pack-Leader)
In the last 10 years or so there have been a raft of pop culture doggy behaviour programs on the TV. The reason, in my opinion, is that folk have forgotten how to handle dogs. Dogs require something akin to an RSM, you can't be a 'pal' with a dog. If you start a training program with a pup, that control behaviour has to be carried out all the time with constant reinforcement. Although it may sound a bit harsh, it is very rewarding for both owner and pet when it works.
Some people choose not to be so 'strict' with their pet, that's fine. Those people will find it hard to introduce and reinforce recall commands, especially when a smaller dog or rabbit is making a bolt, and regardless whether it is a staffie, a terrier, or rottie, when they do lose their position and snap at some unsuspecting passer-by, it's not the dogs fault!

So, confusing real dogs with cartoons, nope, making stuff up, nope.

Beefster
11-06-2012, 11:27 PM
No provocation?

So running up to an animal throwing your arms around its neck and restrictings its head movement, trying to climb on its back or grabbing its.cheeks and shaking violently isn't provocation?

That's some of what my dogs, especially the boxer, puts up with when I take him to the park. They are both well behaved and take it well but parents don't know this when they allow their kids to run up to them.

Most dogs are pretty good with kids and will respond with good.nature to prodding and clapping etc but to allow a child to go up to a dog you don't know is madness.

I agree that kids shouldn't really be running up to dogs that they don't know but I think it's far more important that a dog doesn't attack a kid who does run up to it. Not all kids are old enough to realise that some dogs will happily try to kill them and not all kids can be supervised 100% of the time.

I manage to keep kids away from my dog, just by telling them. Not because he's agressive but because he's a big ball of hair and slobber that I happen to be still training to walk/sit etc when I want him to and so don't want him distracted with small folk clambering all over him.


It would be absolutely fine with me.

Dogs shouldn't be running up to anyone looking for a clap. They should be on a leash in all public areas. I don't care if some of them are harmless, personally I'd rather not take the chance. And even of they are harmless, I don't want one of them anywhere near me.

The main problem, as has been mentioned already, is wee neds that use dogs as a status symbol and to look hard. These are the most dangerous types because they are like their owner - stupid, not trained or looked after properly and are looking around for someone to have a go at.

Responsible dog owners, which I guess are the majority (although like good cyclists you notice them less)... fair enough. If someone wants to have a dog and look after it properly then thats up to them. But responsible dog owners should remember that not everyone is a dog lover and, even if a dog is harmless, a lot of people would rather not have a dog jumping up at them or chasing their kids.

Again, I agree in the main (except for the bit where it's fine for me to stomp a dog that hasn't attacked me). Life isn't perfect though and everything doesn't go to plan - kids will approach strange dogs and dogs will look for affection from strange people sometimes. I don't think either being attacked is justified tbh.

Big Frank
13-06-2012, 10:06 PM
Seems all the dog owners on this thread have very lovely dogs with the nicest of natures which wouldn't hurt a fly.:faf:

Anyhoo, imho all dogs should be leashed and muzzled at all times in public. This would be the best thing to happen in respects of dogs since you were all made to clean their **** up in the streets :aok: It really is a positive thing that the chances of my kids sliding in dog **** has been greatly reduced. I am thankful for this.:agree:

I also think that dog owners should be able to take their mutts to parks designated for them and their dogs. Here they should be allowed to remove their dogs muzzles.

People who don't have dogs, don't like dogs and want nothing to do with them can have their own dog free parks. Where their kids can play freely and no worry when a dog comes bounding up to them and hoping that this particular mutt isnae going to attack them because its one of the mutts who has been raised by a respectable sensible owner per stated on this thread.

One dog ripping a bairns face off anywhere is one too many. The breed of said dog is neither here nor there.

There should be stricter controls on the ownership of dogs in the UK.

Phil D. Rolls
14-06-2012, 06:03 PM
Reservoir Dogs are pretty dangerous.

--------
15-06-2012, 11:02 AM
I think you've hit the nail firmly on the head there mate.

Anyone ever watched the dog whisperer?

Remember Daddy?

Yup. And I remember the wee guy roller-blading behind a dozen assorted muscle-dogs including pit-bulls and rottweilers and having them under complete control.

I also remember the one time I saw him flummoxed by a dog's reaction to discipline. That dog was a Border Collie with a mind of his own. (Is there any other kind?)

IIRC the olny time I saw Cesar defeated was by an Akita owned by a couple of NY yuppies (not neds) who simply had no idea of how to handle such a powerful dog with the sort of instincts an Akita has. But then, one of my close neighbours has an Akita, and he's a big soft teddy-bear. (The Akita, not the neighbour.)



I think that's part of the problem with Staffies - they have to be trained right and can be problematic if not. I have a Golden Retriever with a great temperament (which is just as well considering he has a 4 year old climbing over him constantly) but he'd have a great temperament and absolutely no aggression towards people, dogs or anything, whether I had trained him properly or not.

In my experience, you won't get that with most Staffies, unless they have been trained properly from an early age. We looked at getting one from a rescue home but knowing that most of them wouldn't have been trained properly from pup meant that we decided against it in the end. Too much of a risk with a kid running about the house.

Beefster, ALL dogs have to be trained properly or they become a problem. I would imagine that you've set very definite parameters for your dog's behaviour; he knows that you're the boss and that he's the dog, not the alpha male.

But I've met Golden Retrievers who've really been out of control; not necessarily potentially savage, but very pushy and dominating, and they're big enough to do damage to children even without really being aggressive. They just barge over them.

I have a Border Collie bitch, Lucy, who had two toes cut off one of her hind feet when she was a puppy. She has every right to dislike human beings. In spite of that, she's an absolute sweetie with everyone - totally reliable with anyone from toddlers to great-grannies. The only danger you're in is of being pestered to death to play with her. But I still wouldn't leave her alone with a child. She's also a thief - I learned the hard way not to leave biscuits on the coffee-table, for example - but then, she's a collie, and that's what collies do if you give them the opportunity. We're having a Family Day at the Church next Saturday, and she'll be there, on the lead - first, because I want to know where she is all the time, and second, because if she gets loose she'll cadge hot dogs off all and sundry and end up chucking up on the carpet later in the evening. I know her nature, I behave towards her appropriately, and she (usually) behaves appropriately towards me.

The thing about Staffies and pit-bulls is that when they take a grip, their grip is so strong it's very difficult next to impossible to get them to release. Also, like a number of other terrier breeds, they come from stock that's probably been trained either to fight, or to go after other animals. Bull terriers were legally used for bull-baiting up till 1835 and illegally for years afterwards; they've been used as fighting dogs for centuries, and that HAS to be taken into account when they're being trained. Too many of them simply aren't trained.

To tell the truth, the sorts of dog I really don't like are the wee terriers - Jack Russells, Cairns, Foxies - and a Corgi can be a complete wee demon on legs when it takes it into its head. The only dog I've ever had to extricate from fights was a Corgi, and the other dogs were all much bigger than her, and she was always the aggressor.

A well-trained bullt-terrier, Staffy, even a pit-bull is OK, IMO, but personally, I would question whether I myself would be able to handle one now.

The Modfather
15-06-2012, 12:07 PM
Dogs, meh! Ship them all off to the isle of Dogs and be done with it.

How many fatalities have there been at the paws (see what I did there?) of cats...

'Mon the cats!:greengrin

Matty_Jack04
16-06-2012, 10:58 AM
Seriously? Never heard of that before.

A polish guy came to work with us (yes work and claiming a giro another fine example of the British benefit system) he was an agency guy he said to me that his mrs was away picking up a dog I said a bairn and a dog u must be minted he says naw you get more money if you have a dog

Im only taking what he says as the truth there's every chance he was talking p!sh but it does coincide with the amount of dogs tied up outside my local chemist on a Wednesday morning

--------
16-06-2012, 06:57 PM
Dogs, meh! Ship them all off to the isle of Dogs and be done with it.

How many fatalities have there been at the paws (see what I did there?) of cats...

'Mon the cats!:greengrin


I seem to recall some years ago an old lady suffering a stroke and lying helpless on the floor of her house.

She had three cats.

They ate her.

(Or bits of her.)

While she was still alive ....





And no, I didn't just make that up.

johnbc70
22-12-2012, 10:44 PM
Could have been much worse.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-20817157

Never hear of Labrador's randomly attacking kids do you.

Jonnyboy
22-12-2012, 11:06 PM
Could have been much worse.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-20817157

Never hear of Labrador's randomly attacking kids do you.

Sadly, you do

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2003849/Boy-3-left-horrific-facial-injuries-Labrador-savages-Poole-Harbour.html

johnbc70
23-12-2012, 12:03 AM
Sadly, you do

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2003849/Boy-3-left-horrific-facial-injuries-Labrador-savages-Poole-Harbour.html

Fair enough, goes to show you as I never thought that would be the case. I am still of the view dog licenses should be brought back (although they were 37p when withdrawn in 1984!) You need them in Ireland and Northern Ireland so why not here?

degenerated
23-12-2012, 10:25 AM
Fair enough, goes to show you as I never thought that would be the case. I am still of the view dog licenses should be brought back (although they were 37p when withdrawn in 1984!) You need them in Ireland and Northern Ireland so why not here?

Perhaps fit and proper person criteria would be more appropriate. Dogs, like people, are a product of their environment.

johnbc70
23-12-2012, 10:31 AM
Perhaps fit and proper person criteria would be more appropriate. Dogs, like people, are a product of their environment.

Agreed, but how would you define a fit and proper person to own a dog. Some people are clearly dog lovers and treat their dog they way it should be treated, while others as I said in my original post seem to keep them as some sort of status symbol.

hibsbollah
23-12-2012, 10:41 AM
It would take some political cajones to try to pass some tighter dog control legislation in this country. Taking on the dog loving lobby is probably quite daunting. As can be seen on this thread, every dog owner seems to think they and their dog are perfectly behaved, which evidently isnt the case.

Oh, and i was bitten on the cheek by my grans labrador when i was three and needed stitches, even soppy breeds can turn sometimes...

Beefster
23-12-2012, 11:15 AM
As can be seen on this thread, every dog owner seems to think they and their dog are perfectly behaved, which evidently isnt the case.

Ignoring the fact that even a human couldnt be expected to be perfectly behaved all the time, i don't really understand the justification for the comment. The majority of pet dogs are well-behaved, kept under control and owned responsibly so finding a sample of a dozen or so (ie the ones owned by posters on this thread) doesn't seem particularly difficult.

Either way, I can't see why any responsible owner would object to tighter controls on dog ownership.

hibsbollah
24-12-2012, 11:37 PM
Ignoring the fact that even a human couldnt be expected to be perfectly behaved all the time, i don't really understand the justification for the comment. The majority of pet dogs are well-behaved, kept under control and owned responsibly so finding a sample of a dozen or so (ie the ones owned by posters on this thread) doesn't seem particularly difficult.

Either way, I can't see why any responsible owner would object to tighter controls on dog ownership.

Im not sure what it is that you dont understand. It is self evidently the case that not all dog owners and their dogs are perfectly behaved. Perhaps you misunderstood my post as saying that those Owners on this thread are not perfectly behaved. I have no evidence of that one way or another.

Re-tighter controls, im sure lots of owners would object if it resulted in added inconvenience, cost, or perceived infringement of liberty. Your definition of what constitutes a responsible owner is the crucial factor. Almost every irresponsible dog owner probably thinks they are 'responsible'.

Jones28
25-12-2012, 09:52 PM
4 months ago we bought an Alsatian puppy, 8 weeks old at the time. Already we have ensure he knows that he is bottom of the pile in our house of 4, he respects everyone's authority because we are consistent and disciplined.

Now obviously it's too early to judge what kind of dog he will be, but basing it on the first 4 months he will be a lovely dog.

It's those first few months that will define a dog IMO, if you get that right and are consistant then you can raise almost any breed of dog to be calm and docile.

Cabbage East
27-12-2012, 05:08 PM
Could have been much worse.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-20817157

Never hear of Labrador's randomly attacking kids do you.

My ex girlfriend was attacked by a labrador so you're talking nonsense. And recently a baby was killed by a Jack Russell. You probably read The Sun.

heretoday
28-12-2012, 04:07 PM
Until all dog owners are "socialised" I'll continue to eye their companions with suspicion.