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steakbake
26-03-2010, 01:48 PM
Just got a *** "LOL" at the end of a work email someone has written to me. If it was in my gift, I'd have the woman's IT access withdrawn as a lesson. Might as well have gone the whole hog and pissed me off with a "whoop whoop".

I noticed that a couple of folk on facebook joined a group recently called "I LOLed at this picture...". Now it's a verb.

This, my friends, truly is the mark of civilization on its way to oblivion.

Don't even get me started on "fails" or "major fail".

Anyone else get pissed off at phrases like these?

Sylar
26-03-2010, 01:57 PM
Just got a *** "LOL" at the end of a work email someone has written to me. If it was in my gift, I'd have the woman's IT access withdrawn as a lesson. Might as well have gone the whole hog and pissed me off with a "whoop whoop".

I noticed that a couple of folk on facebook joined a group recently called "I LOLed at this picture...". Now it's a verb.

This, my friends, truly is the mark of civilization on its way to oblivion.

Don't even get me started on "fails" or "major fail".

Anyone else get pissed off at phrases like these?

You missed out epic fail (for the win!).

:wink:

txt spk does my friggin head in!

steakbake
26-03-2010, 02:01 PM
You missed out epic fail (for the win!).

:wink:

txt spk does my friggin head in!

"Epic" fail. I forgot about that one. My bad.

LOL! :agree:

lyonhibs
26-03-2010, 02:02 PM
Just got a *** "LOL" at the end of a work email someone has written to me. If it was in my gift, I'd have the woman's IT access withdrawn as a lesson. Might as well have gone the whole hog and pissed me off with a "whoop whoop".

I noticed that a couple of folk on facebook joined a group recently called "I LOLed at this picture...". Now it's a verb.

This, my friends, truly is the mark of civilization on its way to oblivion.

Don't even get me started on "fails" or "major fail".

Anyone else get pissed off at phrases like these?

Very much so.

FYI
IMO
ROFL
FWIW
etc etc etc

Grim grim grim.

I've got a mate who had a girlfriend (now ex - obviously :greengrin) who would send him texts that we would sit round for hours trying to decipher.

It seemed she was wantonly missing out nouns just for ****s and giggles.

As you say, the beginning of the end linguistically.

steve75
26-03-2010, 02:05 PM
'lol' doesnt bother me too much, its just an easy way to putting some sort of emotion into text, and makes sure poeple don't take what you're saying in the wrong way, as tone in text can be very hard to understand.

However I completly agree with fail, epic and ftw! does my nut it! another is the over use of awesome! I swear my little brother is from the states, him and his friends accents and word use is unbelievably american.

Twa Cairpets
26-03-2010, 02:29 PM
IMHO

My opinions are never humble.

Woody1985
26-03-2010, 02:44 PM
Saying 'My bad' is equally as bad as all those other mentioned.

I once wrote it on here and immediately thought WTF am I doing!

Hank Schrader
26-03-2010, 03:09 PM
Fail
Epic fail
Woop woop
Good times/Bad times

All of the above are very c**ty

Don-hibee
26-03-2010, 03:09 PM
One that will never annoy me is L T Y F :wink:

Danderhall Hibs
26-03-2010, 03:13 PM
My bad.


I hate that one.



FYI


TBF :wink: that's a legitimate one.

ArabHibee
26-03-2010, 03:15 PM
Just got a *** "LOL" at the end of a work email someone has written to me. If it was in my gift, I'd have the woman's IT access withdrawn as a lesson. Might as well have gone the whole hog and pissed me off with a "whoop whoop".

I noticed that a couple of folk on facebook joined a group recently called "I LOLed at this picture...". Now it's a verb.

This, my friends, truly is the mark of civilization on its way to oblivion.

Don't even get me started on "fails" or "major fail".

Anyone else get pissed off at phrases like these?

ROTFLMFAO! :greengrin

Don-hibee
26-03-2010, 03:18 PM
ROTFLMFAO! :greengrin


:tee hee:

steakbake
26-03-2010, 03:39 PM
I hate that one.

Yes, me as well. It's bad enough when you see it in text/email but when someone actually says it...

Hainan Hibs
26-03-2010, 03:42 PM
"Hey, we're going to (insert name) for pre-drinks"

Pre-drinks? Is it possible to come up with anymore of a twatty phrase?

Also on my current list of annoyances is the way people now put "much" at the end of a statement.

Example : I was quite late for class and someone had the audacity to say "late much?" .

Argh:grr:

steve75
26-03-2010, 03:47 PM
"Hey, we're going to (insert name) for pre-drinks"

Pre-drinks? Is it possible to come up with anymore of a twatty phrase?

Also on my current list of annoyances is the way people now put "much" at the end of a statement.

Example : I was quite late for class and someone had the audacity to say "late much?" .

Argh:grr:

annoyin-much? i hate this so much, does my tits in, devil spawn of the myspace generation!

MSK
26-03-2010, 04:39 PM
One that will never annoy me is L T Y F :wink:Annoys the **** out of me though !!! :rolleyes:

steakbake
26-03-2010, 04:44 PM
Annoys the **** out of me though !!! :rolleyes:

This.

---------- Post added at 06:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:44 PM ----------


This.

"This" annoys me as well.

Rory89
26-03-2010, 04:59 PM
LOLocaust.

The one that really gets on my chebs is for the banter, "hey do you wanna go to the cinema for the banter". Just die, die right now. This has even been shortened down to "for the bants", lord christ up in heaven. :grr:

The word "owned" is getting used too much now, ie "yas I just owned you on PES". If I had it my way anyone who says this would have their arse owned by satan for an eternity after they pass away.

P.S I too hate it when people reply to a post with just "this". What a pish contribution.

MSK
26-03-2010, 05:05 PM
This.

---------- Post added at 06:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:44 PM ----------



"This" annoys me as well.Thats quite new isnt it ..?...im pretty familiar with that particular word/expression being used on the main forum by a certain poster from the Burgh..:hmmm:

poolman
26-03-2010, 06:55 PM
Posted from my phone using (whatever it is)

So friggin what, who the **** cares where its posted from :grr:

Danderhall Hibs
26-03-2010, 06:55 PM
It irritates me when folk say "so" in what seems to be the wrong part of a sentence, e.g. "Thats so not right", "That's so what I would have done"

In fact, my bad:greengrin, it's not in the wrong part of the sentence, it's just not needed at all.

Pretty Boy
26-03-2010, 07:06 PM
The word 'like' being used excessively when describing what was said in a conversation.

Person A- So what happened?
Person B- Well he was like shut up so i was like who are you telling to shut up and he was like you and i was like no one talks to me like that.

thekaratekid
26-03-2010, 07:11 PM
http://funnyanimatedgifs.net/get_code/1946-lol-steamloller


:greengrin

Hainan Hibs
26-03-2010, 07:13 PM
Also when girls feel the need to add "ies" to words that don't need them.

"Going out with the girlies for drinkies tonight"

Just **** off. Please.

Beefster
26-03-2010, 07:18 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.

poolman
26-03-2010, 07:37 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.


:smug:

Pretty Boy
26-03-2010, 07:38 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.

:agree::agree::thumbsup::top marks:top marks

Storar
26-03-2010, 07:42 PM
Posted from my phone using (whatever it is)

So friggin what, who the **** cares where its posted from :grr:

think alot of phones do that automatically though

BEEJ
26-03-2010, 07:43 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.
Particularly from posters who feel the need to agree with their own statements by adding (:agree:) after each and every sentence or paragraph.

Then there's the deeply patronising use of (:cool2:), as if the observation just made is so patently obvious that you'd have to be deranged not to have already thought of it.

poolman
26-03-2010, 08:36 PM
think alot of phones do that automatically though


Ah, I sit at my qwerty corrected

I've still got a brick :greengrin

hibsdaft
26-03-2010, 08:52 PM
i use tbh because i am lazy. is that allowed?

ArabHibee
26-03-2010, 09:48 PM
i use tbh because i am lazy. is that allowed?

tbh, yes.

Steve-O
26-03-2010, 09:51 PM
The word 'like' being used excessively when describing what was said in a conversation.

Person A- So what happened?
Person B- Well he was like shut up so i was like who are you telling to shut up and he was like you and i was like no one talks to me like that.

I'm actually listening to one of my girlfriend's mates recounting a story in that very manner right now! It makes me want to go out to the living room and like rip her throat out. She'd be like not saying like very often after that, like.

Ed De Gramo
26-03-2010, 10:10 PM
have you all got sand in your vaginas?

LMAO :wink:

Pete
26-03-2010, 10:31 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.

I agree when you say "over-use" but the use of certain smilies, such as the winkey one is key sometimes.

You can use a blunt sentence to reply to a post and it cannot be interpeted properly unless the smiley is present. It's the next best thing to actually showing your facial expression in a face-to-face environment.

Hiber-nation
26-03-2010, 11:08 PM
Particularly from posters who feel the need to agree with their own statements by adding (:agree:) after each and every sentence or paragraph.

Then there's the deeply patronising use of (:cool2:), as if the observation just made is so patently obvious that you'd have to be deranged not to have already thought of it.

Definitely, these are far far more annoying than 10 zillion "lol"s.

sleeping giant
26-03-2010, 11:21 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.

pfffffft :asshole:

JE89
26-03-2010, 11:22 PM
"Hey, we're going to (insert name) for pre-drinks"

Pre-drinks? Is it possible to come up with anymore of a twatty phrase?



I often say pre-drinks or even more annoying no doubt, pre-skite :greengrin

Much easier than saying "where are we going for alcoholic beverages, before we go for a night out" no? :dunno:

ArabHibee
27-03-2010, 06:46 AM
I often say pre-drinks or even more annoying no doubt, pre-skite :greengrin

Much easier than saying "where are we going for alcoholic beverages, before we go for a night out" no? :dunno:

But isn't going for alcoholic beverages part of the night out?

GhostofBolivar
27-03-2010, 06:56 AM
I often say pre-drinks or even more annoying no doubt, pre-skite :greengrin

Much easier than saying "where are we going for alcoholic beverages, before we go for a night out" no? :dunno:

You aren't going for pre-drinks then, are you?

You're going for drinks.

JE89
27-03-2010, 12:50 PM
But isn't going for alcoholic beverages part of the night out?

Suppose it is. But I always consider the night out, as being in the club. Pre-drinks is simply preparing for ths. :dunno:


You aren't going for pre-drinks then, are you?

You're going for drinks.

Again, I suppose you are right. But it's before the actual night out, therefore 'pre'.

However I can understand why you folk have questioned this. Does seem pretty silly when I actually think about it. Will still say it however :greengrin

Hainan Hibs
27-03-2010, 02:40 PM
I often say pre-drinks or even more annoying no doubt, pre-skite :greengrin

Much easier than saying "where are we going for alcoholic beverages, before we go for a night out" no? :dunno:

I'd rather say something like "we're going to Tam's for drinks before going to a club" as I can keep my dignity and self-respect:greengrin

Rory89
27-03-2010, 02:56 PM
You aren't going for pre-drinks then, are you?

You're going for drinks.

I confess I actually say this.

The pre is referring to the night out, not the drinking of alcohol. When I think about it it sounds quite twattish, but it does still make sense, pre-night out drinks, as opposed to pre-drink drinks.

steakbake
27-03-2010, 02:59 PM
I confess I actually say this.

The pre is referring to the night out, not the drinking of alcohol. When I think about it it sounds quite twattish, but it does still make sense, pre-night out drinks, as opposed to pre-drink drinks.

But surely, even if you call it pre-drinks and it happens before the main event, it's still part of the night out? Pre-night out drinks would probably involve going out the night before for a warm up. Or much earlier in the day then meeting up later on?

Rory89
27-03-2010, 04:04 PM
But surely, even if you call it pre-drinks and it happens before the main event, it's still part of the night out? Pre-night out drinks would probably involve going out the night before for a warm up. Or much earlier in the day then meeting up later on?

This is heading down the long road of pedantry, but your point only stands if the "pre-drinks" are had somewhere else. Usually I talk of "pre-drinks" (although I won't anymore after hearing it back to myself) when people in my flat meet in the kitchen and have some bevvy before all heading out. It's not part of the "night out" because we haven't even left the kitchen yet.

Calvin
27-03-2010, 04:20 PM
The pre refers to the club. I say in meaning pre-club drinks, shortened down to pre-drinks.

I agree with everything else on this thread but I like pre-drinks!

ArabHibee
27-03-2010, 09:41 PM
Pre-drinks. What a load o' pish you youngsters jabber nowadays. A night out is a night out.

Next you'll be telling me there's a new word for 'parents'. :rolleyes:

JE89
27-03-2010, 11:52 PM
Pre-drinks. What a load o' pish you youngsters jabber nowadays. A night out is a night out.

Next you'll be telling me there's a new word for 'parents'. :rolleyes:

:greengrin :grr: I hate old people :greengrin

Rory89
28-03-2010, 12:43 AM
Pre-drinks. What a load o' pish you youngsters jabber nowadays. A night out is a night out.

Next you'll be telling me there's a new word for 'parents'. :rolleyes:

Cash machines.


Just joking my parents give me no money, some cash machines they are.

Steve-O
28-03-2010, 12:45 AM
Suppose it is. But I always consider the night out, as being in the club. Pre-drinks is simply preparing for ths. :dunno:



Again, I suppose you are right. But it's before the actual night out, therefore 'pre'.

However I can understand why you folk have questioned this. Does seem pretty silly when I actually think about it. Will still say it however :greengrin

You young 'uns are off your heid.

Drinks in the boozer before going to a club are as much a part of the night out as going to the club!

---------- Post added at 01:45 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:43 PM ----------


This is heading down the long road of pedantry, but your point only stands if the "pre-drinks" are had somewhere else. Usually I talk of "pre-drinks" (although I won't anymore after hearing it back to myself) when people in my flat meet in the kitchen and have some bevvy before all heading out. It's not part of the "night out" because we haven't even left the kitchen yet.

I can't fathom why it even needs a name?

I would just say "we will have a few drinks in the house before heading out" rather than "hey dudes, come to mine for pre-drinks before the club, it will be wicked, BOOYA!" :greengrin

Rory89
28-03-2010, 12:59 AM
You young 'uns are off your heid.

Drinks in the boozer before going to a club are as much a part of the night out as going to the club!

---------- Post added at 01:45 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:43 PM ----------



I can't fathom why it even needs a name?

I would just say "we will have a few drinks in the house before heading out" rather than "hey dudes, come to mine for pre-drinks before the club, it will be wicked, BOOYA!" :greengrin

Why should it be called a "nightclub"? It's clearly called a big indoor area with loud music, a dancefloor and a bar area where men and women put on their best clothes and dance whilst drinking overpriced alcohol, not a nightclub.

I said myself earlier in the thread it did occur to me that it's a bit gay sounding, but it makes sense despite the reasons people are giving why it doesn't.

Edit to add: Whilst we're ranting about young people (I'm 20 now so feel entitled to air my grumpy old ******* views), I don't mind Facebook and have a page, but it's amazing how often it pops up in conversation. Went back to Edinburgh and went for a night out with some old faces and Facebook was referred to 3 times in the first half an hour of my night out. It's things like "oh by the way I just loved your status". Really, you loved my status, do you know what a ridiculous ***** you sound saying that?

JE89
28-03-2010, 01:08 AM
You young 'uns are off your heid.

Drinks in the boozer before going to a club are as much a part of the night out as going to the club!



Yes, though I rarely drink in the pub as going to somebodys flat, or them coming to mine is a much cheaper option. For me the night out is going to pubs/clubs - not drinking in someones flat first - what I call 'pre-drinks'. Somebody may not go out but will still go to the pre-drinks for a bit of banter.

Rory89
28-03-2010, 01:11 AM
The one that really gets on my chebs is for the banter, "hey do you wanna go to the cinema for the banter".


Somebody may not go out but will still go to the pre-drinks for a bit of banter.

Get out. :grr:

JE89
28-03-2010, 01:28 AM
Get out. :grr:

:faf: I might just stop talking, will please the majority!

Steve-O
28-03-2010, 04:02 AM
Why should it be called a "nightclub"? It's clearly called a big indoor area with loud music, a dancefloor and a bar area where men and women put on their best clothes and dance whilst drinking overpriced alcohol, not a nightclub.

I said myself earlier in the thread it did occur to me that it's a bit gay sounding, but it makes sense despite the reasons people are giving why it doesn't.

Edit to add: Whilst we're ranting about young people (I'm 20 now so feel entitled to air my grumpy old ******* views), I don't mind Facebook and have a page, but it's amazing how often it pops up in conversation. Went back to Edinburgh and went for a night out with some old faces and Facebook was referred to 3 times in the first half an hour of my night out. It's things like "oh by the way I just loved your status". Really, you loved my status, do you know what a ridiculous ***** you sound saying that?

Because it's a club you go to at night.

Rory89
28-03-2010, 04:40 AM
Because it's a club you go to at night.

Yeah and a pre-drink is a drink you have pre-night out.

Oh and Jevitt, the problem is if you stop talking people won't here your bants.

Steve-O
28-03-2010, 05:14 AM
Yeah and a pre-drink is a drink you have pre-night out.

Oh and Jevitt, the problem is if you stop talking people won't here your bants.

Not just drinks before going out?

HibsMax
28-03-2010, 12:10 PM
I don't mind acronyms; language evolves and it doesn't necessarily mean the end of civilisation. What I don't like is text speak where people abbreviate words into letters or numbers. I understand why some people do it, it saves time writing "u r" versus "you are" but personally speaking, I'll take the extra few seconds to spell out a word.

LOL is not more offensive, to me, than :). I would feel kinda stupid writing "Laugh Out Loud" in response to something funny someone had written.

HibsMax
28-03-2010, 12:13 PM
Posted from my phone using (whatever it is)

So friggin what, who the **** cares where its posted from :grr:

I really don't think the people posting messages from the iPhone or Blackberry sit there and type that out, I think it's added on their behalf. Who cares? The manufacturers care. Of course they want as many people knowing about their product. This is just another form of advertising. Don't shoot the messenger. ;)

HibsMax
28-03-2010, 12:17 PM
All of the above pales into insignificance compared to the use/overuse of smilies on all internet forums. If you need to use a smilie to get your point across, you haven't made your point well enough.
I disagree with that. How are you supposed to detect when someone is being sarcastic rather than being a total dick? How do you know when someone isn't being serious? Without being able to see a person's facial expressions or hear the tone of their voice you're actually missing a lot of the context. I think smilies serve a very useful purpose....when used conservatively. ;)

HibsMax
28-03-2010, 12:20 PM
I've never heard of pre-drinks before. I've heard people talking about pre-dinner drinks which I think makes perfect sense.

I used to work with a guy years ago and he had a ton of funny sayings. One of my favourites went something like this:
Him : I hate TLAs
Me : What's a TLA?
Him : Three Letter Acronym

LOL

ArabHibee
28-03-2010, 01:16 PM
I hate people that don't know how to use MULTI-QUOTE on hibs.net!!! :grr:

Judas Iscariot
28-03-2010, 01:23 PM
Pre-drinks. What a load o' pish you youngsters jabber nowadays. A night out is a night out.

Next you'll be telling me there's a new word for 'parents'. :rolleyes:

:agree:

Folk that say **** like that are welts..

FACT

Rory89
28-03-2010, 04:43 PM
:agree:

Folk that say **** like that are welts..

FACT

Anybody who backs up their opinion "FACT" is not only not telling factual information, but their opinion is usually wrong as well.

JE89
28-03-2010, 05:08 PM
Anybody who backs up their opinion "FACT" is not only not telling factual information, but their opinion is usually wrong as well.

And are in FACT a 'welt' :greengrin

_hucks_
28-03-2010, 05:30 PM
For me it's the flagrant mis-use of the word 'random' . If you start chatting to someone you don't know, that is simply what you're doing, you are not chatting to a 'random'. If someone does something weird, they've not done something random, they have actively chosen to do something weird. People think **** like Russel Brand is funny because he says stuff that just doesn't make sense, saying things like 'oh he's just so random'. Bull**** is it random. It's playing up to the fact that people are daft enough to laugh at completely irrelevant things to say. It's used so much and it drives me absolutely f***ing crazy.

Rory89
28-03-2010, 05:33 PM
For me it's the flagrant mis-use of the word 'random' . If you start chatting to someone you don't know, that is simply what you're doing, you are not chatting to a 'random'. If someone does something weird, they've not done something random, they have actively chosen to do something weird. People think **** like Russel Brand is funny because he says stuff that just doesn't make sense, saying things like 'oh he's just so random'. Bull**** is it random. It's playing up to the fact that people are daft enough to laugh at completely irrelevant things to say. It's used so much and it drives me absolutely f***ing crazy.

YouTube - Random - Limmy's Show (Pilot) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGcwDpp6hc4)

P.S on the topic of acronym's like lol, omg and lmao, it doesn't bother me a huge amount when written down, although people actually saying it really gets on my chebs. People actually reply to what others say with "lol", not really laughing out loud then are you? The girls in my flat and the flat upstairs every now and again all watch the TV programme Gossip Girl, and when you see them later they're saying "OMG, I can't believe her, that's super uncool". They aren't even trying to be funny or anything, they genuinely don't seem to phooking notice.

hibsdaft
28-03-2010, 10:15 PM
"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt."

FACT.

goosano
28-03-2010, 11:22 PM
Simples

My blood pressure goes sky high whenever I hear/read the 'word'.

Woody1985
29-03-2010, 12:20 AM
Simples

My blood pressure goes sky high whenever I hear/read the 'word'.

I just want to say to the marketing area of CTM 'Look guys, it was funny as hell and really catchy to start with. However, you're just taken it too far and now it gets on every ***** tits, so **** off and send your meerkat to Uranus on his next ****ing journey'.

I've been on the verge of just blatantly blanking people for saying 'How's you' to me. I've never crossed the line yet and plucked up the courage to do it yet but I reckon I will one day if I'm in a bad mood.

rainman
29-03-2010, 08:07 AM
I just want to say to the marketing area of CTM 'Look guys, it was funny as hell and really catchy to start with. However, you're just taken it too far and now it gets on every ***** tits, so **** off and send your meerkat to Uranus on his next ****ing journey'.

I've been on the verge of just blatantly blanking people for saying 'How's you' to me. I've never crossed the line yet and plucked up the courage to do it yet but I reckon I will one day if I'm in a bad mood.

Funniest thing I've heard in a long time was my mate describing a bar fight he was involved in when he was interrupted by his missus calling him on the phone.

"So ah hud um by the throat an says tae um, dae that again and I'll rip your......"

"Hiya babe, hows you?"

:faf:

SlickShoes
29-03-2010, 08:32 AM
I must admit i use many of these phrases and playing online games alot and typing whilst playing shortening stuff really is quite handy!

Haters Gonna Hate (http://www.gifbin.com/bin/052009/1242032359_haters-gonna-hate.gif)

Ed De Gramo
29-03-2010, 04:09 PM
I just want to say to the marketing area of CTM 'Look guys, it was funny as hell and really catchy to start with. However, you're just taken it too far and now it gets on every ***** tits, so **** off and send your meerkat to Uranus on his next ****ing journey'.

I've been on the verge of just blatantly blanking people for saying 'How's you' to me. I've never crossed the line yet and plucked up the courage to do it yet but I reckon I will one day if I'm in a bad mood.

Turn over when the ads are on...

Simples :aok::cool2:

Hank Schrader
29-03-2010, 04:28 PM
Turn over when the ads are on...

Simples :aok::cool2:

Thats a pretty brainless answer Gramo. I'd get even more pissed off if I had to turn channels every ad break just to avoid the annoying ones and then switch back.

They should just make adverts less ******ing annoying.

hibsboy90
29-03-2010, 05:13 PM
"Hey, we're going to (insert name) for pre-drinks"

Pre-drinks? Is it possible to come up with anymore of a twatty phrase?

Also on my current list of annoyances is the way people now put "much" at the end of a statement.

Example : I was quite late for class and someone had the audacity to say "late much?" .

Argh:grr:


Drinking, prior to going out for the evening

= Prior to going out for the evening we will have some drinks

= Pre Drinks :greengrin

(This of course only applies if the so called 'pre drinks' happen at someone's house/flat before going properly 'out' e.g. bars before clubs)


Also when girls feel the need to add "ies" to words that don't need them.

"Going out with the girlies for drinkies tonight"

Just **** off. Please.

Meant to make it more feminine than - "We're going to get the MD2020 out, have a bottle of wine each and get pissed, fall about drunk all over the place"

Sounds less 'harsh', more girly, and therefore more socially acceptable.


I agree when you say "over-use" but the use of certain smilies, such as the winkey one is key sometimes.

You can use a blunt sentence to reply to a post and it cannot be interpeted properly unless the smiley is present. It's the next best hing to actually showing your facial expression in a face-to-face environment.

:agree:


I often say pre-drinks or even more annoying no doubt, pre-skite :greengrin

Much easier than saying "where are we going for alcoholic beverages, before we go for a night out" no? :dunno:

Also Skite???

Only heard it in Aberdeen with the rugby crowd, but becoming more common. Is it pronounced Skite (as in fight) or Skite (as in feet). Could you not just say out on the town, or out to get pished, or clubbing, or drinking, why Skite, where has it come from? It makes no sense.

My view on Skite is that it embodies the whole evening, including the beverages before which may take place at someones house (or 'pre drinks':wink:)


But isn't going for alcoholic beverages part of the night out?

You aren't going for pre-drinks then, are you?

You're going for drinks.

Not really, you can go to a friend's house for a few beers any night, but when doing so prior to a night on the town, the whole atmosphere is slightly different.


Yes, though I rarely drink in the pub as going to somebodys flat, or them coming to mine is a much cheaper option. For me the night out is going to pubs/clubs - not drinking in someones flat first - what I call 'pre-drinks'. Somebody may not go out but will still go to the pre-drinks for a bit of banter.

Much cheaper, pre loading as it's known as within the licensed trade.



Why should it be called a "nightclub"? It's clearly called a big indoor area with loud music, a dancefloor and a bar area where men and women put on their best clothes and dance whilst drinking overpriced alcohol, not a nightclub.

I said myself earlier in the thread it did occur to me that it's a bit gay sounding, but it makes sense despite the reasons people are giving why it doesn't.

Edit to add: Whilst we're ranting about young people (I'm 20 now so feel entitled to air my grumpy old ******* views), I don't mind Facebook and have a page, but it's amazing how often it pops up in conversation. Went back to Edinburgh and went for a night out with some old faces and Facebook was referred to 3 times in the first half an hour of my night out. It's things like "oh by the way I just loved your status". Really, you loved my status, do you know what a ridiculous ***** you sound saying that?

Nightclub - organised gathering of people, at night, with similar aim or purpose, to dance, drink, listen to loud music.

Finally, only seen it on here, but what on earth is '*****'?? Surely one is a '****' but what added emphasis does the 'o' at the end mean.


I hate people that don't know how to use MULTI-QUOTE on hibs.net!!! :grr:

Hope i've done ok here.

Rory89
29-03-2010, 05:46 PM
Nightclub - organised gathering of people, at night, with similar aim or purpose, to dance, drink, listen to loud music.

Finally, only seen it on here, but what on earth is '*****'?? Surely one is a '****' but what added emphasis does the 'o' at the end mean.


I wasn't really being serious about the nightclub thing, it was a tongue and cheek response to someone asking why it's called pre-drinks, even though it's completely self explanatory.

As for *****, I don't know it pretty much means the same thing I guess. I suppose ***** can also mean when you hit something with force, ie "I accidently *****'d my head off the wall". Really I think it's just because it somehow gets through the swear filter, has more effect than ****.

hibsboy90
29-03-2010, 05:56 PM
I wasn't really being serious about the nightclub thing, it was a tongue and cheek response to someone asking why it's called pre-drinks, even though it's completely self explanatory.

As for *****, I don't know it pretty much means the same thing I guess. I suppose ***** can also mean when you hit something with force, ie "I accidently *****'d my head off the wall". Really I think it's just because it somehow gets through the swear filter, has more effect than ****.
Guessed that, should've added a smilie, my definition was pedantic. :wink:

What's wrong with 'hit'?

lyonhibs
29-03-2010, 06:10 PM
Old folk that instead on not pluralising things - "I'll have 4 slice of ham please" - no, you old duffer, you can have 1 slice of ham or 4 slices of ham!!

Also, old people love to pronounce the number "three" as in "shree" for some reason, and they can't ALL have ill-fitting false teeth surely??

What else?? Folk who - despite being pretty intelligent - can't conjugate verbs. Worst example is a friend from down south who has got it into her head that the phrase "we was" is perfectly acceptable :bitchy:

And the already mentioned grotesque over-use of the word "like", especially by girls in recounting stories.

Also, in the same manner, auld wifies on the bus and their inability to use the verb "to say" in the past tense properly.

E.g.

"Aww hiya doll, I saw <insert pensioners name here> last week, and he says to me............so I says to him "Aye, well.............. so then he says to me................and then I says to him...................... so then she comes in the room and says to me......................." etc etc etc repeat ad infinitum.

Hibby D
29-03-2010, 06:27 PM
I disagree with that. How are you supposed to detect when someone is being sarcastic rather than being a total dick? How do you know when someone isn't being serious? Without being able to see a person's facial expressions or hear the tone of their voice you're actually missing a lot of the context. I think smilies serve a very useful purpose....when used conservatively. ;)

Totally agree HM - And thank God for your contribution to this thread. It's been like an episode of Grumpy Old Men without the humour :wink:

JE89
29-03-2010, 07:07 PM
Old folk that instead on not pluralising things - "I'll have 4 slice of ham please" - no, you old duffer, you can have 1 slice of ham or 4 slices of ham!!

Also, old people love to pronounce the number "three" as in "shree" for some reason, and they can't ALL have ill-fitting false teeth surely??

What else?? Folk who - despite being pretty intelligent - can't conjugate verbs. Worst example is a friend from down south who has got it into her head that the phrase "we was" is perfectly acceptable :bitchy:


:agree: People say I went to America three year ago. It's three years ago!

Also (not heard this since school) that instead of pronouncing H as 'H' they pronounce it 'haych'. Absolutely no need!

Houchy
29-03-2010, 07:57 PM
Posted from my phone using (whatever it is)

So friggin what, who the **** cares where its posted from :grr:

To be fair, it took me a wee while to figure out how to delete this "signature" from my iPhone.

On the subject, what are AFAIK, fail and epic fail?

Thanks in advance.

ArabHibee
29-03-2010, 08:34 PM
:agree: People say I went to America three year ago. It's three years ago!

Also (not heard this since school) that instead of pronouncing H as 'H' they pronounce it 'haych'. Absolutely no need!

That's an English thing. Like when they say 'drawring' instead of 'drawing'.
Weirdos.

lapsedhibee
29-03-2010, 10:48 PM
Also, in the same manner, auld wifies on the bus and their inability to use the verb "to say" in the past tense properly.

E.g.

"Aww hiya doll, I saw <insert pensioners name here> last week, and he says to me............so I says to him "Aye, well.............. so then he says to me................and then I says to him...................... so then she comes in the room and says to me......................." etc etc etc repeat ad infinitum.

Can't believe the conversation went on that long without one of them turning (round) to the other before speaking.

"I says to him and he turns (round) to me and says"

Mixu62
29-03-2010, 11:37 PM
That's an English thing. Like when they say 'drawring' instead of 'drawing'.
Weirdos.

I still don't know who Lauren Awda is. Used to hear it on the news all the time. Prime ministers were always very concerned about her, vowing to get tough on Lauren Awda. Poor lass!

There's plenty of annoying and just downright weird ones over here but "like" is universal. And.....dare I type it....."Holler" is creeping in too. Nooooooo!!

Del Boy
29-03-2010, 11:38 PM
what I really ******* detest is people who go away travelling and come out with the ****y phrase "I did the east coast" or "did you do Asia?"

:grr::grr::grr::grr:

Mixu62
29-03-2010, 11:44 PM
what I really ******* detest is people who go away travelling and come out with the ****y phrase "I did the east coast" or "did you do Asia?"

:grr::grr::grr::grr:

Like that girl Debbie who did Dallas you mean? She's probably the only one who can get away with that!:wink:

Del Boy
29-03-2010, 11:45 PM
Like that girl Debbie who did Dallas you mean? She's probably the only one who can get away with that!:wink:

:greengrin ha ha, yeah I'll let her off!

Steve-O
30-03-2010, 06:56 AM
Not a word or phrase, but let's not forget these cretins who say every sentence like it's a question?

It's, like, really annoying?

I just don't understand why people do it?

Hank Schrader
30-03-2010, 08:10 AM
Not a word or phrase, but let's not forget these cretins who say every sentence like it's a question?

It's, like, really annoying?

I just don't understand why people do it?

Australian Question Intonation is the term I believe.

--------
30-03-2010, 11:00 AM
So the guy I saw last weekend smashed out his skull, covered in puke, and pissing on the back bumper of a Jeep Cherokee (probably his own) was enjoying a wee session of "post-drinkies"? LOL. :rolleyes:

---------- Post added at 12:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:59 AM ----------




Australian Question Intonation is the term I believe?




Sorted that for you? :devil:

Diclonius
30-03-2010, 11:03 AM
Just got a *** "LOL" at the end of a work email someone has written to me. If it was in my gift, I'd have the woman's IT access withdrawn as a lesson. Might as well have gone the whole hog and pissed me off with a "whoop whoop".

I noticed that a couple of folk on facebook joined a group recently called "I LOLed at this picture...". Now it's a verb.

This, my friends, truly is the mark of civilization on its way to oblivion.

Don't even get me started on "fails" or "major fail".

Anyone else get pissed off at phrases like these?

No.. I'm 18.

Get over it, lol.

---------- Post added at 12:03 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:01 PM ----------


To be fair, it took me a wee while to figure out how to delete this "signature" from my iPhone.

On the subject, what are AFAIK, fail and epic fail?

Thanks in advance.

AKAIK - As far as I know.

A fail is self explanatory. An epic fail is a fail so truly bad that it becomes awesome. Think "so bad it's good."

Hope that clears things up for you. :wink:

Hank Schrader
30-03-2010, 12:07 PM
So the guy I saw last weekend smashed out his skull, covered in puke, and pissing on the back bumper of a Jeep Cherokee (probably his own) was enjoying a wee session of "post-drinkies"? LOL. :rolleyes:

---------- Post added at 12:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:59 AM ----------




Sorted that for you? :devil:

Aye, yer a funny man Doddie :greengrin

Caversham Green
30-03-2010, 12:22 PM
I have to say "verbing" still gets to me - e.g. "and how will that impact on profit?"

Likewise, the use "yourself" or "myself" when "you" or "me" would do.

And the new trend amongst football pundits to use the present tense when commenting on an incident - "If he connects with that it goes in"

Makes myself want to impact theirselves' teeth with my boot (if I do that it hurts).

--------
30-03-2010, 01:25 PM
Aye, yer a funny man Doddie :greengrin


You mean? :wink:

Hank Schrader
30-03-2010, 01:26 PM
At the last summer Olympics the constant debate over which of our athletes would "medal" at the games did my head in.

Also the inclusion of "AGE" at the end of a word to emphasise how good something is makes me weep. If someone hears a good song it is met with "TUNEAAAGGGEE"

**** off :bitchy:

lapsedhibee
30-03-2010, 08:42 PM
Australian Question Intonation is the term I believe.

I heard Stephen Fry use the expression Australian Questioning Intonation on the tellybox, but I didn't know it was a universally accepted term?

Ed De Gramo
30-03-2010, 09:12 PM
just had BBC on the phone....they want to do a new series of Grumpy Old Men....:wink:

Speedy
31-03-2010, 12:43 AM
Also when girls feel the need to add "ies" to words that don't need them.

"Going out with the girlies for drinkies tonight"

Just **** off. Please.

Fannies!

Danderhall Hibs
31-03-2010, 09:03 AM
This thread is wicked.

Wicked good - not wicked in the true sense of the meaning of the word.

JE89
31-03-2010, 09:22 AM
This thread is wicked.

Wicked good - not wicked in the true sense of the meaning of the word.

I bet a lot of folk will hate the use of that word :greengrin

Steve-O
31-03-2010, 09:51 AM
Australian Question Intonation is the term I believe.

Is it truly just an Aussie thing? Don't Americans do this too?

Hainan Hibs
31-03-2010, 10:03 AM
Fannies!

Exception to the rule:greengrin

Chuckie
31-03-2010, 10:04 AM
I like it when old ladies say buckin...

I was discussing my tattoos with a couple of younger guys a while back and one of them said about mine 'Wow, they are sick dude'... I didn't know whether to punch him or thank him...

Hank Schrader
31-03-2010, 11:30 AM
Is it truly just an Aussie thing? Don't Americans do this too?

You are correct. As Lapsed Hibee said above its not really an official term, perhaps something that Stephen Fry came up with but seems ingrained in both American and Australian speak. The thing is, when in company of Aussies, I sometime find myself talking like that too? :greengrin

Peevemor
31-03-2010, 11:32 AM
Is it truly just an Aussie thing? Don't Americans do this too?

I've always noticed it more with Aussies (Are you allowed to say Aussie on here? Is it racist?).

--------
31-03-2010, 01:03 PM
Is it truly just an Aussie thing? Don't Americans do this too?


It's an international teenage airhead thing? :devil:

Hank Schrader
31-03-2010, 01:43 PM
I've always noticed it more with Aussies.

Me too

Teo10
31-03-2010, 02:03 PM
Me too

This :agree:

rainman
01-04-2010, 01:38 AM
Australian Question Intonation is the term I believe.

Thought it was called an inflection.

I work in sales in Australia and caught myself doing it one day. I put a stop to that right away!

I could be here all day talking about Aussies.

A couple of favourites:

They stick an O at the end of everything. A smoke break is a smoko. An ambulance is an ambo. If your a bit of a scaff your derro. Every suburb is shortened with an O added. Bunno, Busso. Gets. On. My. Tits.

When they show movie trailers for adverts and they tell you when it's out, they don't say April the first, or The first of April. It's April One. What the f*** is that?

Steve-O
01-04-2010, 10:07 AM
Thought it was called an inflection.

I work in sales in Australia and caught myself doing it one day. I put a stop to that right away!

I could be here all day talking about Aussies.

A couple of favourites:

They stick an O at the end of everything. A smoke break is a smoko. An ambulance is an ambo. If your a bit of a scaff your derro. Every suburb is shortened with an O added. Bunno, Busso. Gets. On. My. Tits.

When they show movie trailers for adverts and they tell you when it's out, they don't say April the first, or The first of April. It's April One. What the f*** is that?

Coronation Street is called 'Coro' as well! :faf:

Hank Schrader
01-04-2010, 11:16 AM
just had BBC on the phone....they want to do a new series of Grumpy Old Men....:wink:

Really? I heard they had dropped that in favour of a new show based on folk described in this thread, to be titled "Irritating Young ****s" :wink::greengrin